Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 78

Thread: ON Magazine's article on oil?

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    939

    ON Magazine's article on oil?

    Did anyone else read that article about oil in the most recent BMW ON magazine.

    I am going to stick my neck out here. I have a college degree, and nearly a Master's degree, and have had a great deal of experience mechanically, much of it on motorcycles.

    However, after suffering through that article 2x, I still don't understand a word of it, and further, I couldn't find one thing that helped me as a BMW owner to gage what oil would be best to purchase for my BMW or any other engine.

    Can someone interpret?

  2. #2
    jeepinbanditrider
    Guest
    Buy oil. Preferbly the slick kind. In a weight that is recommended for your engine (in my case 10-40 works just fine) pour into engine. Have a great day of riding. Change on a semi-regular basis.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    635
    What I recall from reading that article was the statement that "Oil is better than no oil and clean oil is better than dirty oil."

    As long as it meets the manufacturer's specs, buy what brand you like and change at recommended mileage intervals, or once or twice a year if you don't ride that many miles. Ride on, don't worry, be happy.

  4. #4
    X-Troller hexst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Tierra Verde, Florida
    Posts
    281
    I thought it was ironic to see that article after reading the Amsoil ad that the will financially contribute to the MOA for members buying their product.
    Knick
    F800GS
    Vespa ET4

  5. #5
    Rally Rat
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    170
    Definitely a confusing article.

    Pretty charts and pictures though.

    Obviously a "Conclusions" or "Recommendations" paragraph would have been helpful in summarizing all that data. Too bad.

  6. #6
    jeepinbanditrider
    Guest
    You should be able to draw your own conclusions based on the article and the Charts. If I was going to be forced to choose one oil in that article out of the rest of them with the info provided, I'd choose the Mobil 1 or Rotella T based on avaliabilty, price and how performed in the testing.

    But honestly any of those oils listed are going to work and work well for the life of your engine. Think about the last time you heard of an oil related failure on a maintained vehicle

  7. #7
    Registered User lbarbee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Garner, NC
    Posts
    268

    ON Magazine's article on oil?

    Used my advanced technical degree to determine that the article implied: oil is good.
    Lynn
    2008 BMW R1200RT (most fun you can legally have)
    2002 BMW R1150RT
    2008 Kawasaki Versys

  8. #8
    BMW Rider
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    750
    Quote Originally Posted by lbarbee View Post
    Used my advanced technical degree to determine that the article implied: oil is good.
    I am definitely not the sharpest knife in the drawer and I too concluded "oil is good". I guess that's a good thing!

  9. #9
    Registered User lbarbee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Garner, NC
    Posts
    268

    ON Magazine's article on oil?

    Seriously, I took it that the author was trying to say that there was no need to rant about oil. The tests show that in any non-commercial, non-racing application you will never know the difference.
    I took it as an oil thread killer. If you have a passion for a particular oil, buy that one. If you are money conscious buy the one on sale. If you perceive higher performance due to higher price, then by all means buy the highest price. But please buy the proper weight, change at manufacturers intervals, and ride on.
    Lynn
    2008 BMW R1200RT (most fun you can legally have)
    2002 BMW R1150RT
    2008 Kawasaki Versys

  10. #10
    Registered User lbarbee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Garner, NC
    Posts
    268

    ON Magazine's article on oil?

    I am willing to bet lunch, that there is not a single person on this site who has had a verified engine oil related mechanical failure while following manufacturers recommendations. I do find the oil rants a fascinating read into human psychology.

    Never put an odd number of coins in a slot machine, and press the button on even pulls, pull the handle on odd pulls. The machines in the middle of a row pay better, and play during the bottom of the hour. Old quarters before states were imprinted win more often.
    Lynn
    2008 BMW R1200RT (most fun you can legally have)
    2002 BMW R1150RT
    2008 Kawasaki Versys

  11. #11
    Registered User chewbacca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    144
    Quote Originally Posted by lbarbee View Post
    I am willing to bet lunch, that there is not a single person on this site who has had a verified engine oil related mechanical failure while following manufacturers recommendations. I do find the oil rants a fascinating read into human psychology.

    Never put an odd number of coins in a slot machine, and press the button on even pulls, pull the handle on odd pulls. The machines in the middle of a row pay better, and play during the bottom of the hour. Old quarters before states were imprinted win more often.
    I have a chemistry degree so I can understand a lot of the BS in oil threads just a bit better than the average guy. I am also a veteran of a zillion oil thread war on the COG, FJR, Triumph, and STN forums. What I've gotten out of them is there is absolutely no, nada, zilch scientific evidence to show that if you run close to the viscosity and API rating recommended by the manufacturer, that one oil is any better than another. I have also come to the absolute same conclusion as lbarbee on mechanical failures. The overwhelming number of motorcycles crash or are sold multiple times before any major engine failure. That is "overwhelming majority" not onesie twosies. Two things the author stayed away from was synthetic versus dyno and the real reason there are MC specific oils. A very smart thing to do, because it usually goes nowhere. Consumer Reports ran a test on taxi cabs which has disappeared from the planet, but lots of oil warriors have read it and know that it exists, actually measured wear by tearing apart engines and measuring components. Conclusion was that dyno or synthetic really did not show any difference. Why MC specific oil? Primarily because most, not all, MC's run their transmission and crank from the same oil, wet clutches too. Bottom line is if you have an air cooled R1200GS you can almost run vegetable oil (just a joke ), but there is no need to be finicky. That is why I don't care for the new tea kettle. The transmission will cause oil shearing breaking down the multi-viscosity oils much faster than where you have a separate transmission. Even though tests show that synthetics handle shearing better, you still don't see any tests that measure the impact of that. MC oils also deal with wet clutch slippage too. If API badge says energy conserving or you have an ILSAK starburst, don't use it because those oils "can" cause the clutch to slip. Best bet is to find an oil that makes you happy and go ride.
    Old But Not Dead
    Semper Fi

  12. #12
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    4,287
    Quote Originally Posted by CHEWBACCA View Post
    Consumer Reports ran a test on taxi cabs which has disappeared from the planet...
    Here ya go:

    http://www.xs11.com/xs11-info/xs11-i...july-1996.html

    Over the years, I've read the CU test a number of times, and don't find it particularly helpful, since the tested taxi engines were running almost constantly, at full operating temperature.


    Kurt: thanks for all your work on the article: you're a brave man.

    What I took away from your article was that (from Table 3) only five oils tested match, or come close to, having the levels of zinc and phosphorous recommended by LNengineering, and I have a lot of respect for these guys.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    635
    Over the years, I've read the CU test a number of times, and don't find it particularly helpful, since the tested taxi engines were running almost constantly, at full operating temperature


    I think that constant running at full operating temperature (not sure exactly what that temperature is, did you mean maximum temperature?) is a good test of any oil.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    939

    Taxi's?

    Quote Originally Posted by ClassicVW View Post
    Over the years, I've read the CU test a number of times, and don't find it particularly helpful, since the tested taxi engines were running almost constantly, at full operating temperature


    I think that constant running at full operating temperature (not sure exactly what that temperature is, did you mean maximum temperature?) is a good test of any oil.
    Not really. While it may lend some information on longevity, it can't take into account starting over and over in the normal life of an oil change, and also the variation that may occur due to outside temperatures. If an engine is already warmed up it normally will run at the same running temp due to the water thermostat, with the only exception that I am sure there is a "tolerance" on the thermostat that allows a small temp variation.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,198
    Quote Originally Posted by ClassicVW View Post
    Over the years, I've read the CU test a number of times, and don't find it particularly helpful, since the tested taxi engines were running almost constantly, at full operating temperature


    I think that constant running at full operating temperature (not sure exactly what that temperature is, did you mean maximum temperature?) is a good test of any oil.
    BMWCCA's Roundel magazine published a mfg's test that was about the new(at the time) Mobil-1 syn oil that just happened to use an E-30(1980's BMW car) as the test car. The car went for like a million plus miles? & it was done on a dyno type treadwheel situation so no cold starts or road vibration, cannot remember much else as pretty long ago. I recall being impressed with both the car & the oil as few components failed in the time it ran 24/7. The tests was also indicative of how hwy miles are much kinder to vehicles than TAXI cabs ,as an e.g., since that just came up as a poor test of oil. Stop & go driving is a tough situation for any vehicle in many ways. Sitting in traffic with poor airflow is a temperature factor, huh?
    There are some reasons why we keep track of # of cold starts in aviation engines.
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •