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Thread: Camp Stove for Bike

  1. #1
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    Camp Stove for Bike

    Many of you camp when you go riding. What camp stove and cookset do you use when traveling on your bike? Why did you pick that model over any other?

    I just have to ask. Thanks.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  2. #2
    Registered User john1691's Avatar
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    My kids got me a Walmart "Black Granite" non-stick cook set for Christmas a bunch of years back when I got back into camping. It was cheap and packs small. Not as light as some of the backpack stuff, but has been durable and the non-stick coating is still in good condition. I don't cook much while camping, so it has mostly been used to boil water for oatmeal and coffee, though I have done eggs/sausage a couple times. The lid/fry pan is small, so if doing pancakes, it takes a while, but for hotdogs or a burger it is perfect. Not sure what brand my stove is, as it was a garage sale find for $2. It screws onto the small LP gas canisters. Again, not as small or light as other options, but fuel is easy to find anywhere (K-mart, Walmart, any campground, etc.) and I ride a K1200GT with the 49 liter trunk, so tiny and feather lite isn't always needed. If my wife camped with me, or I had to carry everything myself (back packing), I'd get different gear. For motorcycle camping, this works well.

    The temptation is to get the smallest/lightest/newest thing out there. I have buddies with 2,3,4 stoves, tents, whatever. I still look at tents even though I have 4 in my garage. Each one has helped me learn what I want/don't want in a tent. The reality is I camp 3-4 times a year, so do I really need the "perfect" tent, or can I be content with what I have? Look at how often you will use it, what conditions will you use it in, and how many are you going to be cooking for. The Walmart purchase might be right for you, or maybe something from Campmor or REI might better suite your needs. Just depends on you.
    john1691
    2006 KTM 950 Super Moto

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    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    I used a Coleman Dual Fuel (gasoline or Coleman fuel) stove for over 20 years. It finally had a valve break. I recently found another one like it - new condition - so bought it. I use gasoline straight out of my auxiliary fuel tank most of the time. No fuel to haul, special canisters to find, or any of those complications. It cooks fine too.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  4. #4
    Touring Jarhead jeepinbanditrider's Avatar
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    I use a small one burner pocket rocket type stove that I bought from Amazon for 8 dollars. it's made in China but works amazingly well. with settings from "simmer" to "Saturn V"

    The hot spot on it is kinda small so I don't use a large pan. I usually try to use one of those ceramic lined coffee cup type things you can buy at wal mart back in the camping section for cheap.
    2007 F800ST
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    1978 GS1000E

  5. #5
    MearthA rdalland's Avatar
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    Jetboil works for me.



    My cooler is a little bigger now...

    ride what you've got; enjoy the road you're on!

    Reid - Stone Ridge, NY - MOA #69187 - Turbo Fluffy Motoclub - IBA #50182

  6. #6
    Registered User rkoreis's Avatar
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    Rather than replying with what I carry, I'd like to know how you intend to use a camp stove. what works for my purpose might not work for yours.

  7. #7
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    rkoreis,

    What works for you might also work for me. I have never camped with a motorcycle before. Your opinion is important. That is the reason for asking why you picked one stove or cook set over another. On top of that, I figure I can learn from others.

    I don't plan to cook a 4 course meal, if that is what you are asking. Of course there is always back packing food.
    I have used that in the past. Beyond that, maybe, instant oatmeal or bacon & eggs in the morning. Hot dogs or burgers or maybe soups or stews for the other times.
    I only have to cook for one. My cat refuses to go for a ride, and my wife has no interest in motorcycles.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  8. #8
    BeemerBoy terham's Avatar
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    I use an MSR whisperlite stove and an MSR Alpine cook set because this is what I already had for backpacking. I generally use it to heat water for coffee, freeze-dried dinners or to make pasta dishes or soups. I don't carry a fry pan for more "exotic" meals, but use it for breakfast and dinners. I like it because it's compact and lightweight, will burn any kind of fuel - though I always carry white gas, each component is small and can fit in nooks and crannies in the saddlebags, is rugged and heats water pretty quickly. The main thing I don't like about it is it takes time to cool down so you can't pack it too soon after cooking breakfast. I generally eat first and let the stove cool while I pack and it gets packed last. My cookset is two nested pots and a top. I cook in one and eat in the other and can pack smaller items (coffee cup, utensils, lighter etc) in the pots.

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    Terence
    R75/5 R100RS K100RS R1100S

  9. #9
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Liquid Fuel Stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by ARGENT BRICK View Post
    What camp stove and cookset do you use when traveling on your bike? Why did you pick that model over any other?
    I was a backpacker before taking up motorcycling and that's where my stoves come from. My first stove was the family Optimus 8R
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    Purchased in the mid '70s and still working. This stove hooked me on liquid fuel stoves.

    When I started hiking on my own, I purchased an MSR Whisperlite
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    Much lighter than the 8R, but difficult to simmer. This is only a drawback to those who want to cook rather than just boil.

    I picked up at a yard sale, as a backup, a vintage Svea 123
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    Most recently, I acquired an MSR Dragonfly, similar to the Whisperlite, but able to simmer and designed to burn several fuels rather than just "White" Gas.

    The biggest advantage of liquid fuel stoves to MC campers is that they can burn pump gasoline. Some recommend using it only occasionally, due to additives, and some are designed for it. They do need to be pre-heated before cooking, so there is a learning curve v.s. liquified gas stoves (butane, propane, etc.).

    I have no experience with alcohol or solid fuel stoves. I have seen Sterno used, but am told it is very difficult to boil water in quantity.
    Justin in Somerville, MA
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    76 R75/6, 78 P200E, 63 VBB
    Lots of bicycles

  10. #10
    Registered User dwyandell's Avatar
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    I'm still using the MSR Model 9 stove that I bought new in '73. It has always worked fine, including some fuels that were not recommended, and boils faster than my son's new MSR Dragonfly. The Dragonfly is a nice stove but clogs more easily and is harder to maintain. I still have the original MSR (Sigg) fuel bottle that came with it although I've replaced the cap and/or gasket a few times. The instructions were in the bag with it; they're clean because this might be the first time I've ever opened them up.

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    If you look closely you'll see I have two more spare O-rings for the coupling of the fuel pipe to the pump, the main point of failure/leaking on this rig (they're on the J-hook at the neck of the fuel pipe). I've replaced two already, so . ..maybe another 40 years to go.
    Dave in Vermont
    '84 R80ST
    '81 R100 hack

  11. #11
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwyandell View Post
    I'm still using the MSR Model 9 stove that I bought new in '73. It has always worked fine, including some fuels that were not recommended, and boils faster than my son's new MSR Dragonfly. The Dragonfly is a nice stove but clogs more easily and is harder to maintain. I still have the original MSR (Sigg) fuel bottle that came with it although I've replaced the cap and/or gasket a few times. The instructions were in the bag with it; they're clean because this might be the first time I've ever opened them up.

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    If you look closely you'll see I have two more spare O-rings for the coupling of the fuel pipe to the pump, the main point of failure/leaking on this rig (they're on the J-hook at the neck of the fuel pipe). I've replaced two already, so . ..maybe another 40 years to go.
    That looks like the old XGK stove! I would like to know what the difference is between the two. I have an old XGK but, I don't care for it because of pot stability. Adding spare O-rings on the J-hook is a good idea. Does your Model 9 stove sound like a jet engine?

    I can't wait to read what others are using.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  12. #12
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    I use a Trangia Alcohol burner. I've two burners, one in the full trangia kit and another with a clickstand for those times I need a second burner.




    Burner close-up



    Breakfast



    Dinner (two burners, no waiting)



    Clickstand with wind shield on the right



    Prior to the Trangia stove I was using a Coleman Exponent Xtreme stove. It initially required the use of Coleman Powermax gas canisters which were not common. They eventually went extinct. I understand you can purchase an adapter that allows the use of other gas canisters. Before the Xtreme stove I was using a Coleman Peak 1 Apex multi fuel. I stopped using it the day a pot of boiling water slid off the burner and very nearly wound up in my lap.

  13. #13
    MOA #148075, BMWRO Shaun09's Avatar
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    Camp Stove for Bike

    In over 40 years of backpacking and 25 years of motorcycling, I've only ever boiled water for freeze-dried food, oatmeal, tea, or cocoa. As such, my pots are pretty much pristine. The freeze-dried food isn't necessarily boring either with what is available these days (or if you make your own).

    Ever since I got one of the original Jetboil systems, I haven't touched my older MSR DragonFly or MSR WhisperLite stoves. The Jetboil, delivers 2 cups of boiling water in 2 minutes without having to worry about preheating fuel or leaking fuel seals found with the older MSR products.

    As mentioned earlier, the MSR stoves can produce a flame like a space shuttle launch, but also take a while to cool off. I'm a big fan of the MSR range of products, yet find the Jetboil stove to be very convenient for short backpacking trips or motorcycling.

    Cheers!
    Chris

    2009 BMW R1200RT (Shaun), 2004 MINI Cooper S (Gromit), 2006 BMW X3 (Wallace)

  14. #14
    Ozzie Flyer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaun09 View Post
    In over 40 years of backpacking and 25 years of motorcycling, I've only ever boiled water for freeze-dried food, oatmeal, tea, or cocoa. As such, my pots are pretty much pristine. The freeze-dried food isn't necessarily boring either with what is available these days (or if you make your own).

    Ever since I got one of the original Jetboil systems, I haven't touched my older MSR DragonFly or MSR WhisperLite stoves. The Jetboil, delivers 2 cups of boiling water in 2 minutes without having to worry about preheating fuel or leaking fuel seals found with the older MSR products.

    As mentioned earlier, the MSR stoves can produce a flame like a space shuttle launch, but also take a while to cool off. I'm a big fan of the MSR range of products, yet find the Jetboil stove to be very convenient for short backpacking trips or motorcycling.

    Cheers!
    +1
    Jetboil rocks. Does all i need.
    Best regards
    Paul
    regards
    Paul
    Ozzie Flyer
    BE KIND TO HUMANS... THEY BITE

  15. #15
    Registered User dwyandell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARGENT BRICK View Post
    That looks like the old XGK stove! I would like to know what the difference is between the two. I have an old XGK but, I don't care for it because of pot stability. Adding spare O-rings on the J-hook is a good idea. Does your Model 9 stove sound like a jet engine?

    I can't wait to read what others are using.

    The MSR model 9 was their first, I think, probably designed by Larry Penberthy who founded MSR and introduced around '72 when MSR got started.

    Yes the pot tips over very easily - - the folding struts that form the pot stand are way too small and were made larger on later models.
    And yes it is incredibly loud, sounds like a space shuttle launch. . . .wakes up the whole campground but puts out a TON of heat. Surprisingly it doesnt use much fuel, about the same as my son's new dragonfly. It simmers very poorly (note the can top, which is used under an aluminum pot to spread the heat for 'low' cooking). But it boils fast and, like an AK47, is simple by design and entirely field-serviceable. I carry a little loop of steel guitar string in the bag for cleaning.

    I suspect mine has lasted for 40 years because other campers tend not to borrow it, like a bike nobody else can start. Since it looks and sounds homebuilt they think it will explode, or else they've seen me tip over a big pot of something boiling.

    In answer to your original question, the kind of stove you may want really DOES depend on what kind of cooking you'll do. When traveling on a motorcycle (or backpacking, or cycling), I take the minimum and the MSR works perfectly for that purpose--I bring one aluminum pot that the stove fits inside, a lid, potgrips, a mug, bowl, small hunting knife, and spoon. If you're creative you can make a pretty nice meal with a very small stove as long as it produces enough heat. Alcohol stoves can be the size of a mug, but they take forever to boil anything.

    I would not choose my MSR for family camping, a big tuck-in breakfast with a large cast iron skillet, etc. It produces plenty of heat but is an awful cooking platform. My advice is to go to a restaurant for the big meals, but cook very simply in camp. . . .when the weather turns bad, you are half frozen and just want to hit the sack, it is nice to be able to make a hot drink or boil up some noodles (or oatmeal, etc). The newer MSR stoves are ok for bigger pots, since the cooking platform is more stable.

    If I have a little extra space, I'll add a small cast iron skillet (in a simple cloth bag, since it will get sooty in the fire) and spatula, which opens up the possibilities for campfire cooking (don't use your aluminum cooking gear in the campfire!). A SMALL skillet will still work on most camp stoves. Pack light and be creative.
    Dave in Vermont
    '84 R80ST
    '81 R100 hack

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