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Thread: Camp Stove for Bike

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  1. #1
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    Camp Stove for Bike

    Many of you camp when you go riding. What camp stove and cookset do you use when traveling on your bike? Why did you pick that model over any other?

    I just have to ask. Thanks.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  2. #2
    Rally Rat
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    My kids got me a Walmart "Black Granite" non-stick cook set for Christmas a bunch of years back when I got back into camping. It was cheap and packs small. Not as light as some of the backpack stuff, but has been durable and the non-stick coating is still in good condition. I don't cook much while camping, so it has mostly been used to boil water for oatmeal and coffee, though I have done eggs/sausage a couple times. The lid/fry pan is small, so if doing pancakes, it takes a while, but for hotdogs or a burger it is perfect. Not sure what brand my stove is, as it was a garage sale find for $2. It screws onto the small LP gas canisters. Again, not as small or light as other options, but fuel is easy to find anywhere (K-mart, Walmart, any campground, etc.) and I ride a K1200GT with the 49 liter trunk, so tiny and feather lite isn't always needed. If my wife camped with me, or I had to carry everything myself (back packing), I'd get different gear. For motorcycle camping, this works well.

    The temptation is to get the smallest/lightest/newest thing out there. I have buddies with 2,3,4 stoves, tents, whatever. I still look at tents even though I have 4 in my garage. Each one has helped me learn what I want/don't want in a tent. The reality is I camp 3-4 times a year, so do I really need the "perfect" tent, or can I be content with what I have? Look at how often you will use it, what conditions will you use it in, and how many are you going to be cooking for. The Walmart purchase might be right for you, or maybe something from Campmor or REI might better suite your needs. Just depends on you.

  3. #3
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    I used a Coleman Dual Fuel (gasoline or Coleman fuel) stove for over 20 years. It finally had a valve break. I recently found another one like it - new condition - so bought it. I use gasoline straight out of my auxiliary fuel tank most of the time. No fuel to haul, special canisters to find, or any of those complications. It cooks fine too.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  4. #4
    MearthA rdalland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    special canisters to find
    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    In some locations fuel cannisters can be hard if not impossible to buy.
    They are not that hard to find in my experience. I've spent more time trying to find a gas station than I have finding fuel for my jetboil stove...
    ride what you've got; enjoy the road you're on!

    Reid - Stone Ridge, NY - MOA #69187 - Turbo Fluffy Motoclub - IBA #50182

  5. #5
    Wilderness Photographer cchoc's Avatar
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    Another vote for Jetboil.
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    Charlie...
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  6. #6
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    HERE'S an oldie!

    I just got a "Pocket Stove" sold at Aerostitch for 16$. Now how can you get any better/simpler? Its a fuel tab type stove and very primatively designed. Much like the old and still around Sterno fold up stoves, but! This thing boils 16oz of water in 2 minutes and 32oz in less than 5, all by tablet fuel source. Now, I have others and carry my JetBoil still, but this tiny efficient, almost unreal small and easy to carry anywhere on the bike is my second and maybe even my first choice. German made and so very minimalist kinda packing unit. Each tablet burns way hot for about 12 minutes and savable if not used up. This is by FAR the easiest cooker I have ever found and now joins my fleet of stoves. Randy

  7. #7
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cchoc View Post
    Another vote for Jetboil.
    The Jetboil seems to be very popular. I need to take a closer look at it.

    A friend of mine has the Jetboil and his only complaint is the that the heat is rather concentrated in a small area of the pot. Says it's great if you are mainly heating up water but not worth a flip for real cooking. I find this odd, considering all of the different pots and stuff available for the
    Jetboil system. Maybe you guys can pass some wisdom on to a newbie like myself.

    My friend decided to pick up a MSR Reactor for himself and pass the Jet Boil on to his wife. Anyone use a Reactor?
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  8. #8
    jeepinbanditrider
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    I use a small one burner pocket rocket type stove that I bought from Amazon for 8 dollars. it's made in China but works amazingly well. with settings from "simmer" to "Saturn V"

    The hot spot on it is kinda small so I don't use a large pan. I usually try to use one of those ceramic lined coffee cup type things you can buy at wal mart back in the camping section for cheap.

  9. #9
    MearthA rdalland's Avatar
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    Jetboil works for me.



    My cooler is a little bigger now...

    ride what you've got; enjoy the road you're on!

    Reid - Stone Ridge, NY - MOA #69187 - Turbo Fluffy Motoclub - IBA #50182

  10. #10
    Registered User rkoreis's Avatar
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    Rather than replying with what I carry, I'd like to know how you intend to use a camp stove. what works for my purpose might not work for yours.

  11. #11
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    rkoreis,

    What works for you might also work for me. I have never camped with a motorcycle before. Your opinion is important. That is the reason for asking why you picked one stove or cook set over another. On top of that, I figure I can learn from others.

    I don't plan to cook a 4 course meal, if that is what you are asking. Of course there is always back packing food.
    I have used that in the past. Beyond that, maybe, instant oatmeal or bacon & eggs in the morning. Hot dogs or burgers or maybe soups or stews for the other times.
    I only have to cook for one. My cat refuses to go for a ride, and my wife has no interest in motorcycles.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  12. #12
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Liquid Fuel Stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by ARGENT BRICK View Post
    What camp stove and cookset do you use when traveling on your bike? Why did you pick that model over any other?
    I was a backpacker before taking up motorcycling and that's where my stoves come from. My first stove was the family Optimus 8R
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    Purchased in the mid '70s and still working. This stove hooked me on liquid fuel stoves.

    When I started hiking on my own, I purchased an MSR Whisperlite
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    Much lighter than the 8R, but difficult to simmer. This is only a drawback to those who want to cook rather than just boil.

    I picked up at a yard sale, as a backup, a vintage Svea 123
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    Most recently, I acquired an MSR Dragonfly, similar to the Whisperlite, but able to simmer and designed to burn several fuels rather than just "White" Gas.

    The biggest advantage of liquid fuel stoves to MC campers is that they can burn pump gasoline. Some recommend using it only occasionally, due to additives, and some are designed for it. They do need to be pre-heated before cooking, so there is a learning curve v.s. liquified gas stoves (butane, propane, etc.).

    I have no experience with alcohol or solid fuel stoves. I have seen Sterno used, but am told it is very difficult to boil water in quantity.
    Justin in Somerville, MA
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  13. #13
    Registered User dwyandell's Avatar
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    I'm still using the MSR Model 9 stove that I bought new in '73. It has always worked fine, including some fuels that were not recommended, and boils faster than my son's new MSR Dragonfly. The Dragonfly is a nice stove but clogs more easily and is harder to maintain. I still have the original MSR (Sigg) fuel bottle that came with it although I've replaced the cap and/or gasket a few times. The instructions were in the bag with it; they're clean because this might be the first time I've ever opened them up.

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    If you look closely you'll see I have two more spare O-rings for the coupling of the fuel pipe to the pump, the main point of failure/leaking on this rig (they're on the J-hook at the neck of the fuel pipe). I've replaced two already, so . ..maybe another 40 years to go.
    Dave in Vermont
    '84 R80ST
    '81 R100 hack

  14. #14
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwyandell View Post
    I'm still using the MSR Model 9 stove that I bought new in '73. It has always worked fine, including some fuels that were not recommended, and boils faster than my son's new MSR Dragonfly. The Dragonfly is a nice stove but clogs more easily and is harder to maintain. I still have the original MSR (Sigg) fuel bottle that came with it although I've replaced the cap and/or gasket a few times. The instructions were in the bag with it; they're clean because this might be the first time I've ever opened them up.

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    If you look closely you'll see I have two more spare O-rings for the coupling of the fuel pipe to the pump, the main point of failure/leaking on this rig (they're on the J-hook at the neck of the fuel pipe). I've replaced two already, so . ..maybe another 40 years to go.
    That looks like the old XGK stove! I would like to know what the difference is between the two. I have an old XGK but, I don't care for it because of pot stability. Adding spare O-rings on the J-hook is a good idea. Does your Model 9 stove sound like a jet engine?

    I can't wait to read what others are using.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  15. #15
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    I use a Trangia Alcohol burner. I've two burners, one in the full trangia kit and another with a clickstand for those times I need a second burner.




    Burner close-up



    Breakfast



    Dinner (two burners, no waiting)



    Clickstand with wind shield on the right



    Prior to the Trangia stove I was using a Coleman Exponent Xtreme stove. It initially required the use of Coleman Powermax gas canisters which were not common. They eventually went extinct. I understand you can purchase an adapter that allows the use of other gas canisters. Before the Xtreme stove I was using a Coleman Peak 1 Apex multi fuel. I stopped using it the day a pot of boiling water slid off the burner and very nearly wound up in my lap.

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