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Thread: Gearbox Ground Thread Stripped

  1. #16
    Rally Rat
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    Stripped threads

    A Heli-Coil will do the trick. (6x1.0) And it takes away less metal than the other insert. You'll have to cut off a couple of coils as there isn't a lot of depth to the threads. Stuff a greasy rag in there to capture the shavings. Although you can do the installation with the tranny in the bike, you might want to look at as a chance to do the input shaft spline lube.
    Boxerbruce

  2. #17
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Wanderer View Post
    Explorer for example uses iespell or something like that. Worst browser ever though.
    I didn't know this...I thought it was part of VBulletin. I have a spell check feature on my posts but it wants to download iespell when I click it...decided not to. Thanks...
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #18
    Registered User PAS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Wanderer View Post
    Spell check is embedded in your browser nowadays.
    If you are using Firefox click on Tools, Options, Advanced and in the Browsing box check the "Check my spelling as I type" option. Incorrect spelling will be underlined with a red squiggly line as you go indicating an error you need to fix. VBulletin has no spell checker per se but instead relies on your browsers capabilities to do this.

    Explorer for example uses iespell or something like that. Worst browser ever though.
    My Firefox already has the "Check my spelling as I type" checked. OK I just found out. When a squiggly line appears, I have to right click on it then choose the correct spelling from the list of words. I would have never figured it out.
    Thanks guys!!

  4. #19
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAS View Post
    My Firefox already has the "Check my spelling as I type" checked. OK I just found out. When a squiggly line appears, I have to right click on it then choose the correct spelling from the list of words. I would have never figured it out.
    Thanks guys!!
    Pro Noblem!

    I forgot about the right click thing. That kicks it up a notch.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  5. #20
    Registered User Manitou_Commando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1074 View Post
    A Heli-Coil will do the trick. (6x1.0) And it takes away less metal than the other insert. You'll have to cut off a couple of coils as there isn't a lot of depth to the threads. Stuff a greasy rag in there to capture the shavings. Although you can do the installation with the tranny in the bike, you might want to look at as a chance to do the input shaft spline lube.

    Thanks. I'll give that a try. If it can't be done insitu then I'll pull it.

    Ironically, I just had the gearbox rebuilt and installed it. Twice. I am getting good at it.

    As far as spell check is concerned, the right click feature is extant on IE, Chrome, and the Brand X browser mentioned below.
    Rick

    It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so. A. Lincoln

  6. #21
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    This thread insert idea has been rehashed a bunch here & there but I don't know the location of that screw w/o looking as for amt of metal and opening to work but I'll throw this out- there are many brands of inserts & many have different "models" that offer various metals,lengths and wall thicknesses and that's in addition to the fact that there various installation methods & tools needed. Some also offer threads not available in others. Some you have to buy several , others only a few. My point here(comes from experience) is to not limit your search to helicoil brand. Once you know every aspect of the situation then look for what works best for that.
    I often use a brand/model called "Thinsert" and there are suppliers that will sell a couple. They are thinwall but strong. It's possible to install some types/brands w/o buying special tools needed for insertion or special taps that are weird sizes & pricey. Look around a lot before you pick one. The Chinese are selling insert kits on ebay too. Fastenal is all USA over but charges a bunch for shipping small stuff that comes in on their own truck! & it comes to them, not my house. Ebay is a good place to wander around the insert types .
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

  7. #22
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Is "Thinsert" the same as a Timesert? When I google thinserts in get dental inserts. ???

    I've seen timeserts used twice now and have been impressed. I think they work best when there's lots of meat to drill into though and not sure how thick the rear transmission cover is. This would be a factor of course. Whole bunch of good videos on how they work here: http://www.timesert.com/html/install.html#A

    They are not as cheap as helicoils; about $63 on ebay for the tools and five 6mm inserts. http://www.ebay.com/itm/TIME-SERT-NE...item43b1244897 Amazon sells these also at similar prices.

    I like the idea of replacing aluminum threads with solid steel ones in places where the aluminum threads have failed anyway.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  8. #23
    Arctic Art
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    Alter ground

    I didn't like to undo that bolt and remove the ground strap every time I went in to the front cover.So,I cut a slot in the lug at the battery and I loosen the bolt at the battery and slip off the cable leaving the trans bolt alone.

  9. #24
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    Google "Keensert thread insert" The insert I've used last several times is the one that has a slot similar to a gland nut on top and if the treads are loos you can screw it in with a fat tip screwdriver or if room you simply place a cap screw with a stopper nut and wrench it in. They come with a dollop of red Locktite on them. It's always a matter of each situation and which insert fits that scenario. Most machine shops already own the taps,etc., for helicoils but to avoid that expense I like inserts that use "normal tap sizes" , which I already own. Fastenal sells several choices but you have to pay them to deliver it to their store on their truck which is a rip to me as they are coming anyway! I think I had to buy 5 where I got mine last time. Look on ebay at the metric insert kits -maybe those will work?
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

  10. #25
    Registered User Manitou_Commando's Avatar
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    At the moment I am still evaluating various options for thread repair. I am appreciative of the input from the community, as well. My single trepidation is that I would rather not pull the gearbox as it requires a great deal of other dis-sembly. The clearance is minimal between the front of the swingarm and the rear of the gearbox where the screw resides.

    Some thread inserts that are intended for use in wood attracted me though I am all too aware that a correct repair will give me the best long term result. The ultimate removal of the gearbox seems inevitable, but i's 25 degrees today, so i am not in a hurry.
    Rick

    It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so. A. Lincoln

  11. #26
    Rally Rat
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    Pulling the transmission

    There isn't all that much to pulling the transmission back. If you pull the swingarm pivot pins, and drop the brake pedal assembly, you can pull the swingarm back far enough to easily remove the tranny. I use a tie down strap to hold the wheel/swingarm assembly back , wrapped around the rear fender.
    Boxerbruce

  12. #27
    Registered User PAS's Avatar
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    No fun wrenching when its below freezing. Especially when its not an emergency.

  13. #28
    Registered User Manitou_Commando's Avatar
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    OK, all done.

    First I disconnected the ground (HA)! I removed the swingarm pivots to allow me ability to remove the shock.
    Second, I rigged a NEW 1/4" bit into a flexible shaft. This was needed for the additional required to reach the hole. The bit went in under the frame gussett at the swingarm pivot.

    Straight shot! Took all of 10 seconds to run a bit into the hole. I had shoved a rolled up towel into the speedo drive to prevent swage from entering. I then used my aluminum magnet to remove the shavings. The aluminum magnet consists of a tiny screwdriver with a bit of oil on it. Clean as a whistle.

    Then ran a M6 X 1.0 die over the bolt to make sure it was clean.

    Then I inserted the OEM Brand thread insert (AutoZone) into the hole. Then I put the whole deal back together. Total time, exclusive of shopping <1HR.
    Don't ask me how much I spent!!!!!

    Thanks.

    Rick
    Rick

    It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so. A. Lincoln

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