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Thread: First Aide Kit

  1. #1
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    First Aide Kit

    I'm looking to purchase a ready-made first aide kit to carry on my RT. What advice can you share?

  2. #2
    Geoxman KJ6OCL's Avatar
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    Sorry, no advice at this time. I've been thinking about the same issue, so I'm interested in the solutions other riders have.

    Lkarl KJ6OCL / 2000, R1200C

  3. #3
    na1g
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    Aerostich has an assortment of first aid kits. Prices run from $18 to $60 for the "Survival Kit". Check the lists of contents and add what you feel you need. I have a kit from Aerostich that they no longer show and it has proven useful for a few events. I always add a small quantity of personal medications and some extra Band-aids (can never have too many). It's important to replace the contents of a kit periodically as the stuff gets out-of-date.

    pete

  4. #4
    got, got, got no time... rguy's Avatar
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    I bought a basic First Aid kit at a local store, took it home, opened it up and analyzed the contents. I then added things that I thought would be good additions for basic emergency trauma treatment. More gauze, gauze pads, lots more tape. More band aids of course - large and small. It already had scissors, small splints, etc. A small tube of petroleum jelly and antibiotic ointment are good additions if not already there. Spend a couple of minutes staring at your medicine cabinet.... it will spur you imagination. Think about how you would treat different types of wounds, abrasions, etc. I don't think I have anything to treat a burn... I may have to add another small tube of sumthin. Topical spray antihistamine is good, tablets too. Some of these things I already carry in my normal travel kit.
    Neal - '09 R1200GS / '81 R65
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    Be the person that your dog thinks you are.

  5. #5
    Ohio RT
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    First Aide Kits

    Try adventuremedicalkits dot com. I carry their Ultralight/watertight kit. (The small one) and I add a few things to it like additional band aids etc. they are available on ebay, amazon etc as well... I keep essentials like sunscreen and advil in the tank bag.

    Quote Originally Posted by DVEINEDER View Post
    I'm looking to purchase a ready-made first aide kit to carry on my RT. What advice can you share?

  6. #6
    otherwise
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    BMW kit as a recipe

    I read the contents of the BMW kit and put together my own from that.
    Most of the things were already in the house (and paid for). My daughter
    made a pouch that I put them in. I review what's in it each year to see if
    I still think it works and so I remember what's there.

  7. #7
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    http://www.wunderlichamerica.com/mot...e/1724624.html

    http://www.touratech-usa.com/Store/1918/First-Aid

    Your BMW dealer could have one or more of these in stock ... mine does.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  8. #8
    jeepinbanditrider
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    Do you have any medical training?

    I carry my own pieced together medical kit on the bike but also have an Adventure Medical Trauma Kit.

    I suggest if you don't have any training to get some first. Don't get too caught up on fancy stuff and the hemostatic agents. They are useful but nothing beats a good roll of gauze.

    Mine rides in one pocket of my tankbag and includes the following

    1x medical shears
    1x Kerlix Gauze
    1x Israeli bandage
    1x Quick Clot Gauze
    1x Sharpie
    1x Tourniquet
    Then various little things like chapstick, Motrin, Imodium tabs and Benedryl. Doesn't take up a lot of space and will allow you to save someones life by buying them enough time for the pros to show up.

  9. #9
    Rally Rat
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    I bought a cheap first aid kit at Harbor Freight, mostly because it was a soft ziper close type of bag, fits in the side bag nicely. I added better quality items as needed, add bandaides and change out the ointments each spring, as it is in the pannier all the time and I would imagine extreme temps change the healing properties of some items.

    I had first aid in Boy Scouts, again when I worked in a Psych Hospital, again when on the company safety commitee, and every year our local club has a winter Tech/Safety Day that we have a local EMT come in and give an hour talk on accident scene management and basic first aid. I'm no medic, but hopefully I know enough to not cause further damage. I tend to use the kit more when just working in the garage at home because it is close and handy. I hate having to explain to the wife why I am bleeding on the floor as I look for the house first aid kit.......

  10. #10
    John
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    This is always a tuff question to answer depending upon the amount of space one wants to dedicate to a First Aide kit? Also part of the equation is your medical expertise and what you feel comfortable treating? I had a long carreer in the Fire Service with a lot of training and a fair amount of experience. Most people have not had a basic First Aide class.

    A small premade kit is a good start. Then I throw away what I feel is useless and add what I think is important. Everyone that has responded to this thread has some great ideas. Downs idea of a first aide kit is pretty close to my own. With his list of over the counter meds, I also have aspirin. It can help with a cardiac related issue when help is not immediately available. I also have a few large bleed pads. I hate seeing blood. So I have the big pads to help stop the big bleed and make it so I cant see it! A roll of self adhearing athletic tape has many great bandaging uses.

    If you build your own kit, soft or hard sided fishing tackle boxes can work great for holding and organizing the contents of your kit. They are fairly inexpensive and offer a lot of options.

    I am glad someone asked the question? Better yet was all the great kits people have put together or purchased. How many times have you cut your finger and just wanted a band aid? Nice to know that a few folks might have one available!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DVEINEDER View Post
    I'm looking to purchase a ready-made first aide kit to carry on my RT. What advice can you share?
    Thanks for the great advice. I believe I need to retrain on my first aide skills. Then I'll buy a kit and revise it to my skills level.

  12. #12
    Curmudgeon At Large Bobmws's Avatar
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    Years ago someone told me they carried Anbesol (sp), the numbing agent to toothaches, to treat roadrash. Knock wood, I've never used it for that, but it has come in handy for a toothache on the road.
    Bob Weis
    '04 K12RS - Hannigan Hack
    www.earplugco.com

  13. #13
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    first aide kits

    Aerostich has a few pretty good basic kits but you should always add to a kit depending on what kind of riding you are doing. (neosporin, insect sting stuff, lots of band aides for blusters, cuts, etc. good pair of tweezers for splinters, etc., - good start on items. I had a really good kit for my charter boat but I had to downsize for the bike. I feel a first aid class is really important. Maybe your club or just a group of interested riders could ask an EMT to help out by doing a little seminar. Most of these individuals would be happy to accommodate.

  14. #14
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    For me the easiest way was to get the same medical kit I have on my boat. I got it from westmarine.com they have several sizes. What I do like about them is they have a simple to read first aid card with each packet.
    Janda
    2011 R1200R

  15. #15
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    As for training ...

    ... I can put a band-aid on myself but if I'm more seriously injured I'd think someone else would be taking care of me. My contribution will be to tell them how to find my first aid kit. In the old days, Airheads had decals showing the location, i.e. an arrow to the button for raising the seat. I'm considering something of the sort on my RT's "glovebox."

    FWIW one thing I carry in addition to the red kit from Wunderlich is an Epi-pen, as I once had a bit of a reaction when I was stung when a bee got into my jacket. Dr. said it could be worse next time. I have to admit I'll have to read the directions when/if it happens.

    I do little to no solo riding, but not so sure I'll "inventory" the medical skills in any group I happen to go riding with. Wife/girlfriend seems a better bet, especially if she rides her own bike.

    Over all I'd think it all fairly academic, but it sure can't hurt to have some sort of kit along.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

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