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Thread: 2007 RT Final Drive Bearing Replacement

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  1. #1
    R1200RT jankoman's Avatar
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    2007 RT Final Drive Bearing Replacement

    After reading some of the increasing number of posts on the Final Drive (FD) issues, I decided to check mine. I disconnected the brake caliper and sure enough, there was some play and while spinning the rear wheel, there was clearly a bearing going bad in there. The bike has 16,000 miles on it and when I purchased it in Sept. 2011 with only 1600 miles on it, I had always felt (literally) as though the bearing was not good. I could feel the roughness in my feet, especially when braking. So I decided to change the FD bearing. I decided to go with an aftermarket bearing and thanks to Nick Plenzick, I called HermeyÔÇÖs in PA and ordered a new NSK 6013VVC3 and a new shaft seal (33 11 7 679 864). I had changed the FD oil at 12K so removing the FD required the additional step of removing the ISA Screw and Pivot Pin. This proved to be more difficult than I had planned. Make sure you have a good T55 Torx bit and either a 22MM or 15/16 six-point short socket. Once I got the screw out, the threads on mine were covered with red thread-locker!

    I used the BMW RepROM for reference throughout this process (33 10 050 & 33 12 560).

    Here is the FD mounted to a 4x4 with lag screws: Primitive but it works! Only need to remove wheel flange at this point. I did not have a T40 Torx bit long enough to remove the brake rotor. I had ordered one but found that it really doesnÔÇÖt need to come off unless you already have the long Torx bit. I ordered a 6ÔÇØ Impact T40. The rotor can be removed once the flange is pulled off the wheel axle, and a long bit is not needed. (I did remove the rotor when I was re-installing the flange near the end of this process.)

    Note the tool I had made to pull the flange off the wheel axle. ItÔÇÖs the same as BMWÔÇÖs tool number 33 2 506. ItÔÇÖs sitting on top of the wheel axle.

    DSC_0277.jpg
    "To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex." MK

  2. #2
    R1200RT jankoman's Avatar
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    Below is another ÔÇ£toolÔÇØ I needed to make: 3/8ÔÇØ metal plate. Again, itÔÇÖs not pretty, but it worked great. I bought five ÔÇ£lugÔÇØ bolts at Lowes (M10-1.25x75). The hole in the middle is .750ÔÇØ.

    DSC_0280.jpg
    "To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex." MK

  3. #3
    R1200RT jankoman's Avatar
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    Here is the plate bolted to flange with 5/8ÔÇØ nuts as spacers. The 8ÔÇØ gear puller is mounted on top, grabbing the plate. I heated flange with Benzo-matic torch: took about 12 minutes to get to a temperature where the flange began to move. Once it started moving, it came right off. Now having the proper T40 bit, I would have removed the caliper prior to this step.

    DSC_0281.jpg
    "To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex." MK

  4. #4
    R1200RT jankoman's Avatar
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    Here is the housing after the wheel flange is removed. At this point I removed the ten T40 bolts holding the bearing housing to the FD housing. It took a little, careful prying, but the two halves split apart. I laid the shims and bolts out so that everything would go back together the same way. Keep an eye out for the large o-ring on the bearing housing. I think if I were to do this again, I would order a replacement o-ring when ordering bearing and oil seal.

    DSC_0283.jpg
    "To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex." MK

  5. #5
    R1200RT jankoman's Avatar
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    At this point, the wheel axle needs to be pressed out of the bearing. I was a little reluctant to apply pressure to the bearing housing using three-jaw gear puller. So I sprayed some penetrating oil where the wheel axle passes through the inner race of the bearing and let it sit for 24 hours. I choose meaty parts of the bearing housing to attach the jaws to, applied pressure, and tapped the gear puller screw and it eventually popped. (Sorry, no picture.) It startled me, I thought something broke but it was the wheel axle starting to move. A press would be a better way to go, but I did not have one available. Needless to say, the wheel axle came out of bearing without any damage to the housing.

    Picture of wheel axle / crown wheel after pressed out of FD bearing.

    DSC_0291.jpg
    "To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex." MK

  6. #6
    R1200RT jankoman's Avatar
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    Picture of bearing housing.

    DSC_0292.jpg
    "To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex." MK

  7. #7
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jankoman View Post
    Here is the plate bolted to flange with 5/8ÔÇØ nuts as spacers. The 8ÔÇØ gear puller is mounted on top, grabbing the plate. I heated flange with Benzo-matic torch: took about 12 minutes to get to a temperature where the flange began to move. Once it started moving, it came right off. Now having the proper T40 bit, I would have removed the caliper prior to this step.

    DSC_0281.jpg
    Another method that can be used to pull the flange is to use a harmonic balancer puller attached to a slide hammer. Mine came as part of a cheap ($12) slide hammer kit. It attached to the flange using three of the wheel lug screws. As you noted it doesn't take much to pull the flange once it is heated. A few gentle taps with the slide hammer did the trick.


  8. #8
    R1200RT jankoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    Another method that can be used to pull the flange is to use a harmonic balancer puller attached to a slide hammer. Mine came as part of a cheap ($12) slide hammer kit. It attached to the flange using three of the wheel lug screws. As you noted it doesn't take much to pull the flange once it is heated. A few gentle taps with the slide hammer did the trick.

    Agreed! I was expecting to have to apply alot of force to slide flange off. However, the heat was key. After about 10 minutes I could start to hear the flange expanding then off she slid a couple of minutes later. Sliding it back on went even smoother: I had wrapped the flange in foil and put in oven at 200 degrees for about a 1/2 hour, she dropped right back on!
    "To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex." MK

  9. #9
    Rocky Bow BMW Riders #197 bogthebasher's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Impressive write-up and pictures. Takes some (much) of the mystery out of the 'hidden' parts of the drive train. Even if I never do this repair on one of our RTs it is good to know what the mechanic is doing should there be any issue with the repair, cost, or parts required. Information like this is very helpful. Thanks.
    Ken
    [2008 R1200RT (Biarritz Blue) - Mine]
    [2007 R1200RT (Sand Biege) - Hers]

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