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Thread: '73 R60/5 Blocking Crankshaft Technique

  1. #1
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    '73 R60/5 Blocking Crankshaft Technique

    Hi Gang,

    I was able to get my bike into the porch - now able to do some work during the MN winter!

    Planning to pull the transmission and do a spline lube, as no baseline as when this was last done. While I'm doing that, I want to pull the clutch and check to see if it's still in spec. In the June 2010 issue of ON magazine, Matthew Parkhouse writes about this subject: on removing the clutch he says "with the earlier style, you're fighting a compressed spring. Remove every other bolt and place some sort of compression set up in their place." In the picture, he's showing a steel bar with a couple faucet handles on it used to compress the clutch plate.
    Is this what I'm going to need to do and if so, do I need to make a tool like that or where can I find one?

    Since I'll be pulling the clutch, I want to check the main seal and replace it if it's not in top shape. I'll also replace the oil pump "O" ring, then re-torque of the oil pump cover.

    In case the main seal is bad - I read 2 ways t block the crankshaft - Matthew Parkhouse writes "I blocked the crank by replacing the alternatior bolt with a different bolt that stood proud about 1/2 inch. Then I replaced the front cover and bolted it down. This eliminated any possibility that the crankshaft would move forward when the flywheel came off."
    Oak uses a different technique: "the way to do it is take a piece of wood like a strong 2x2 @3 feet long. Remove the front engine cover. Rest the wood at the FRONT of the alternator rotor. Then securely lash the wood to each cylinder using about 6 bungee cords around each cylinder and wood. With the wood pressing agains the alternator rotor the crankshaft cannot move forward."

    Interested in your experience in doing this service and how you did it. If anyone has the tool used to R&R main seal available for loan or sale, let me know - I won't know if I need it until I get the flywheel pulled. This may be several weeks off.

    Interested to also know what bolts I should replace - ie. driveshaft & bolts that hold the clutch plate.

    Thanks much!
    Ken Tuvman
    Excelsior, MN
    K75s, R65LS, R60/5

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    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Ken -

    I don't specifically recall Matt's picture, but I suspect the steel bar is used to keep the crankshaft from turning while you wrench off the clutch pack bolts. I found a simple bar to hook onto one of the transmission mount bolts and the other end goes into one of the empty clutch bolts.

    To relieve the spring pressure on the clutch, you need 3 long (~70mm) bolts of the same pitch along with a nut and washer. You remove every other clutch pack both and then run these long bolts in to the holes. Run the nuts and washers down to finger tight against the clutch pack. Then remove the other three original clutch bolts. Now with an open end wrench, back off the nuts evenly on the three long bolts. Eventually, the spring pressure will be relieve and you can the take everything apart.

    Snowbum also shows a tool to block the crank. Cycleworks and Northwood Tools also sell such a tool.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #3
    advrider.com
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    Kurts reply is accurate for the clutch removal.

    To block the crankshaft, I use a style more like Parkhouses.. I use a piece of wood duct-taped to the end of the rotor, sandwiched under the front cover. Oaks method just seems too bulky.

  4. #4
    Registered User melville's Avatar
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    I was able to remove clutch on my /6 with 45mm bolts. YMMV. Check the thread on the clutch bolts--mine were M8 X 1, a finer thread than standard M8.

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    Ken,
    I see you live in Excelsior. We have a good bunch of Airheads here in the area. Our Airmarshall Curt lives near 101 and 7. We are planning a tech day in May. I ride a 1875 R60/6 and a 1984 R80RT. You can get the bolts you need to remove the clutch plates at Ace Hardware. I use a bolt similar to the tool Northwoods sells to block the crank. You could use a 2x4 and strap it to the frame pulling back against the crank.
    Let me know if you are interested meeting up with the local Airhead group and I can give you some contact information.
    Steve

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    Rally Rat
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    I wrote up a thread about some work I did on my /6, showing pictures etc. Take a look at this, it may help...

    Re: blocking the crank: I found it easiest to "shim" with a piece of wood taped to the front of the alternator, then re-install the front cover so that it snugs up directly to the "shim".... Northwoods has a simple nylon bolt that you put into the alternator rotor which does the same thing. The key is to use the cover as the "strength" to keep the crank from sliding forward. This lets you put some serious pressure on the crank-end in order to prise out the old seal... pics in the thread above... just look through. Then do it!


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    i've used discarded bicycle inner tubes. folded and duct taped to block the crank. with the compression of the rubber, i could just wad up a bunch, and not worry about precision measurements)
    it does not matter what you use to block it and keep it from moving forward, but you really want to be sure that the crank can't slip forward.
    i have a bar made from angle iron for locking the flywheel in position. again, exact structure doesn't matter as much as just gettng something that locks it in place against your turning forces.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

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    I did this a few months back to my R60/5. With the right tools and some patients its a pretty straight forward process.

    I purchased the tools from North Woods Airheads, and was very happy with everything with one small caveat: I had to grind down the flywheel holder to get it to fit into place. Not sure why, but once I took a little material off the angled edges it worked like a charm.

    Here are the tools I used:
    Crankshaft Blocking Bolt: this is just a little plastic bolt that goes into the front rotor under the motor generator cover removed. once in place you put the generator cover back on to hold it in place.

    Clutch Back out bolts: these are long bolts that you replace three of the six clutch bolts with, then back them off each slowly to ease the pressure off the clutch spring. You do the reverse to get the clutch back on

    Clutch Alignment tool: this simply keep the clutch centered when you re-attach the clutch, very hand but could probably do the job without it.

    Swing arm tool: this is just a large socket that has been ground down to easily fit into the swing arm bolts.

    Rear main seal installer: this was expensive, but made the job of installing the master seal REALLY easy.

    I also picked up the torque wrench adapter for the driveshaft bolts, which can be kind of hard to get a grip on with a standard box wrench.

    Like I said the process was pretty easy, remove everything down to the clutch, remove three of the clutch bolts, insert the longer bolts in place, tighten down the nuts, remove the other three clutch bolts, then slowly back out the nuts on the longer bolts, and your clutch is free.

    When reassembling everything you will definitely want to replace the clutch bolts (updated version), drive shaft bolts (with the newer version), and probably the driveshaft boot while you are in there.

    here is a link to my thread: http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...5-back-to-life

    I probably have some more pictures of the clutch process as well that I did not post, will dig for them.

  9. #9
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHANDELAND View Post
    Ken,
    I see you live in Excelsior. We have a good bunch of Airheads here in the area. Our Airmarshall Curt lives near 101 and 7. We are planning a tech day in May. I ride a 1875 R60/6 and a 1984 R80RT. You can get the bolts you need to remove the clutch plates at Ace Hardware. I use a bolt similar to the tool Northwoods sells to block the crank. You could use a 2x4 and strap it to the frame pulling back against the crank.
    Let me know if you are interested meeting up with the local Airhead group and I can give you some contact information.
    Steve
    Funny how the universe works! I spoke with Curt last night on the phone and he told me about the tech day in May - looking forward to it! - he'll be loaning me the tool to install the new main seal. And based on Kurt's suggestion (moderator of this group), I ordered some tools this morning from Jeff at Northwoods in WI - the little plastic blocking bolt to block the crank, a flat bar to hold the flywheel, and the (3) bolts that I could have bought at Ace hardware but was feeling lazy when it was minus 30 degrees outside! I also ordered a new rear main seal and the "O" ring.

    I almost flipped when I called the local dealer to order the new bolts for the flywheel and oil pump cover (Northwoods doesn't sell them) Would you believe BMW is charging $6 EACH for these bolts? (I need 5 bolts) Hucky's sells them for less but when I factored in freight and the 10% MOA discount the dealer gives me, it's somewhat of a wash. I know it's good to get BMW OEM parts but come on, $6 for a little bolt?

    I plan to take pictures and document the work I do. I've read a nice document from Jeff's Northwoods website and I know to set engine at OT (top dead center) and I've got a paint marker to make sure the flywheel goes on the same way it comes off.

    Will report back once I get the job completed. And thanks, guys for all you great suggestions above!
    Ken Tuvman
    Excelsior, MN
    K75s, R65LS, R60/5

  10. #10
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpeckham136133 View Post
    I wrote up a thread about some work I did on my /6, showing pictures etc. Take a look at this, it may help...

    Re: blocking the crank: I found it easiest to "shim" with a piece of wood taped to the front of the alternator, then re-install the front cover so that it snugs up directly to the "shim".... Northwoods has a simple nylon bolt that you put into the alternator rotor which does the same thing. The key is to use the cover as the "strength" to keep the crank from sliding forward. This lets you put some serious pressure on the crank-end in order to prise out the old seal... pics in the thread above... just look through. Then do it!

    Your thread is awesome! Thanks so much!
    Ken Tuvman
    Excelsior, MN
    K75s, R65LS, R60/5

  11. #11
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    Finding TDC via the alternator bolt

    In the past, I've adjusted the valves by rotating the rear tire with the spark plugs removed.

    In this event, I'll be turning the alternator bolt - do I turn this in a clockwise direction?

    Thanks,
    Ken Tuvman
    Excelsior, MN
    K75s, R65LS, R60/5

  12. #12
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Ken -

    I can never remember but I think it turns CW when viewed from the front. Here's what I did...I removed the front cover (after disconnecting the battery ground) and using a combination of turning the rear wheel (really bumping the rear wheel while sitting at the side of the bike) you can see the direction the alternator will move. Then I took a sharpie and put an arrow on the front side of the rotor as to the direction that it turns. Never have to think about it again.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  13. #13
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    Great suggestion Kurt
    Ken Tuvman
    Excelsior, MN
    K75s, R65LS, R60/5

  14. #14
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    While I've got the flywheel off, I want to repaint the marks on the flywheel - went to O'Reilly's and they don't have a white paint pen.

    White out is easy but probably not permanent. What do you guys use for paint?
    Ken Tuvman
    Excelsior, MN
    K75s, R65LS, R60/5

  15. #15
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    a white paint pen. shake, rattle and dab. worked great for driveshaft alignment marks. try somewhere other than O'R's.

    Testor's (remember their paint from the days of making model cars?), Enamel Paint Marker is the brand name of what i've been using.
    Last edited by bikerfish1100; 01-25-2013 at 01:07 AM.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

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