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Thread: Oil head valve adjustment question

  1. #1
    Registered User jpm1074's Avatar
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    Oil head valve adjustment question

    Going to do a valve adjustment on my R1150GS and don't have a lot of experience with boxer motors. Purchased feeler gauges from wunderlich watched several videos on youtube on the subject and still have a couple of questions. When you find the "OT" mark on the flywheel via the inspection hole, are both cylinders at top dead center? Do you adjust the valves on both cylinders at that time?

    Thanks in advance for input.

  2. #2
    Lucky motorradmike's Avatar
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    Both are at TDC but only one side can be adjusted.

    You need to read up on this.
    I'll try to find a link for you, there are many.


    Edit: I can't find the one I'm looking for. If you look around here for a while you'll find a wealth of information.

    Tip:
    - You don't need to find TDC by removing the inspection plug, you can instead look at the arrows on the cam drive sprockets.
    Last edited by MotorradMike; 01-20-2013 at 03:30 PM.
    Mike Marr
    1978 Yamaha XS750 (Needs rings), 1996 BMW R1100RS, 2004 Honda CRF230F

  3. #3
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    we got your valve adjustment thread right here!

    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  4. #4
    Registered User jpm1074's Avatar
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    Thanks For the quick response! Watched a ton of videos on YouTube and most only show adjustments on one cylinder and don't mention the other cylinder. I also purchased a service manual for my particular bike and the instructions are vague at best. Can you elaborate on the cam gear markings a little more?

    Thanks, J.P.

  5. #5
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    1. Set timing mark to OT
    2. Remove both valve covers.
    3. Identify the side (left or right) where you can feel slight play in intake AND exhaust valve rockers. Verify by observing that on the other side all valves/rockers have no gap.
    4. Adjust the valves on the side where you observed the play/looseness/gap.

    THEN
    5. Rotate the engine clockwise from the front exactly ONE full revolution until the OT mark again appears centered in the window.
    6. Verify that the valves on the side you just did are tight, and on the side you are about to do are loose.
    7. Adjust the valves on the second side.
    8. Reinstall valve covers.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  6. #6
    Geoxman KJ6OCL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    1. Set timing mark to OT
    2. Remove both valve covers.
    3. Identify the side (left or right) where you can feel slight play in intake AND exhaust valve rockers. Verify by observing that on the other side all valves/rockers have no gap.
    4. Adjust the valves on the side where you observed the play/looseness/gap.

    THEN
    5. Rotate the engine clockwise from the front exactly ONE full revolution until the OT mark again appears centered in the window.
    6. Verify that the valves on the side you just did are tight, and on the side you are about to do are loose.
    7. Adjust the valves on the second side.
    8. Reinstall valve covers.

    +1 for Paul

    Lkarl KJ6OCL / 2000, R1200C

  7. #7
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    cam diagram is on page 2 of this thread:
    http://forums.pelicanparts.com/bmw-r...-valves-2.html

    and i will do something I never do, and disagree with Paul G.
    Pull valve covers first (they have to come off anyway, so why ont), and use the cam gear. i have not bothered pulling the timing hole plug in over 10 years, and set my valves at least 1x/yr.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  8. #8
    Lucky motorradmike's Avatar
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    I would never disagree with Paul, but I will heartily agree with you bikerfish!
    Cam arrows are the best way to avoid accidently pushing that inspection hole plug into the engine.
    Not a big deal if you do, but ...
    Mike Marr
    1978 Yamaha XS750 (Needs rings), 1996 BMW R1100RS, 2004 Honda CRF230F

  9. #9
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotorradMike View Post
    I would never disagree with Paul, but I will heartily agree with you bikerfish!
    Cam arrows are the best way to avoid accidently pushing that inspection hole plug into the engine.
    Not a big deal if you do, but ...
    Yes - that works.

    As for the timing hole plug. I use plugs from Airheads. Fit tight, won't push through. And explaining OT centered in the hole is a lot easier than trying to explain over the Internet the marks and arrows on the cam sprockets that are often stamped a few degrees off anyway.

    For the old timers, I could have explained how to find TDC using a wood pencil through the spark plug hole too - but for somebody doing this the first time, OT centered in the hole is the least error prone method.

    Flame suit on.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  10. #10
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    No flame earned, Paul. That was a thoroughly reaonable explanation for using the hole, at least for a first time effort.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  11. #11
    Registered User Olsensan's Avatar
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    Hey JTM, the fun doesn't end with the valve adjustment. It is a good idea to synch your throttle bodies afterward. Also, pay close attention to using the two feeler gauges, if the valves are off and the synch is off a bit, you will notice it when the bike is running. The 1150RT has an issue with that called surging. I have found that when the valves are done just right, she runs very smoothly. If not, well that means another valve adjustment. Don't let this get you stressed, it is you learning and finding that sweet spot.

    Here is a video for doing the valve adjust. Utube has a good library of videos available.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8jxG1CH8tc

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndMgHakBkKg This is part 1....... (2 parts Includes initial 600 mile cyl head torquing)

  12. #12
    Registered User m_stock10506's Avatar
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    tn_IMG_0343.JPG

    The sprocket is harder to see when it is installed, but not that difficult. You're looking for the arrow, pointed outward - horizontal.

    If you grab hold of the exhaust rockers with your fingers, one side of the engine will not move or flex at all, on the other side you should hear or feel a little click and you should see the oil on the adjuster get squeezed or pulled a tiny bit. The side that clicks is the side that you adjust both intake and exhaust. Once done, rotate the engine so the arrow on the other side is pointing out. Now that side should have a click/movement and the side you just finished should feel solid and unmovable.
    Michael Stock, Trinity, NC
    R1100RT, R100, R60/6

  13. #13
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by m_stock10506 View Post
    tn_IMG_0343.JPG

    The sprocket is harder to see when it is installed, but not that difficult. You're looking for the arrow, pointed outward - horizontal.

    If you grab hold of the exhaust rockers with your fingers, one side of the engine will not move or flex at all, on the other side you should hear or feel a little click and you should see the oil on the adjuster get squeezed or pulled a tiny bit. The side that clicks is the side that you adjust both intake and exhaust. Once done, rotate the engine so the arrow on the other side is pointing out. Now that side should have a click/movement and the side you just finished should feel solid and unmovable.
    I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one who gets confused about these TDC sprocket posts so I'll toss in a bit more info.
    It is helpful to note that m_stock10506 is holding the right side cam chain sprocket and the photo is taken from the rear of engine. (At least I think he is!) [ATTACH]37163 Note the alignment notch is facing down and also that most people will be looking at the other side of the sprocket from inside the valve cover area and not from the rear. You have to remove the plastic cover to see from the rear.
    Also important to note that the arrows are horizontal when the LEFT side cylinder is at TDC but the alignment notch is facing UP.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  14. #14
    Just me rad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Wanderer View Post
    I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one who gets confused about these TDC sprocket posts so I'll toss in a bit more info.
    It is helpful to note that m_stock10506 is holding the right side cam chain sprocket and the photo is taken from the rear of engine. (At least I think he is!) [ATTACH]37163 Note the alignment notch is facing down and also that most people will be looking at the other side of the sprocket from inside the valve cover area and not from the rear. You have to remove the plastic cover to see from the rear.
    Also important to note that the arrows are horizontal when the LEFT side cylinder is at TDC but the alignment notch is facing UP.
    I can't tell from your post if you have ever done a valve adjustment using the arrows. I have done it that way for years and it is very easy and simple and nothing other than the valve cover needs to be removed.

  15. #15
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    Timing hole plug installation

    Losing is never an issue if you center it to the bottom of a small hammer handle with a dab of grease.
    Orient the oval correctly and push squarely over the hole. It will pop in easily and there is no risk of pushing it thru.
    Came up with that years ago. No issues.
    '
    Ufda happens..........

    It's all about the details.

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