Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Low BMW R1200R?

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    We live in a rustic cabin in Maine though our residence is in NH.
    Posts
    57

    Low BMW R1200R?

    With age and a leg ingurey I am looking for a lower and lighter bike than my 1200RT. Low GS models are hard to find and the low seat alone doesn't quite do it. I am looking at the R1200R which does but I also want to do gravel roads comfortably. I ride two up most of the time and want it to be comfortable for my wife.
    Your input will be appreciated.
    Bill Zeller
    2006 R1200RT
    2007 F650 GS single Lowered. This is light and easy but rough on back roads for
    two up.

  2. #2
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Spring Lake NJ, USA
    Posts
    7,730
    The low model of the R1200R would probably suit you. Two caveats:

    1. Being lower means reduced ground clearance. The BMW R12R manual has a warning about this as related to cornering.. ie you can't "heel" the bike over as far as a standard suspension model before things start to touch (I rather like the use of nautical terms, I tend to use the same sort of terms for left/right side of the bike).. and they warn that going over obstructions you may touch down the engine a bit sooner.

    2. Being lowered the way BMW did also reduces the amount of suspension travel available. This may cause a bit harsher ride - and correctly setting preload/dynamic sag is more critical to a comfortable ride.

    That said - I lowered my R12R with Hyperpro shocks, about 3/4". I worked with Klaus of EPM (the vendor) to design shocks that provide the standard suspension travel. This required fitting the shocks to the bike with no springs and fully compressing the suspension to make sure nothing banged together at full compression. This is not the standard design from any aftermarket shock manufacturer that I know of - most are afraid of things hitting, so they limit the compression to the same amount as the standard (and lower) factory components.

    Doing it the way Klaus/EPM set mine up results in a more compliant ride avoiding problem #2. It also means that it might be possible that problem #1 becomes more critical - but if I'm at full compression when cornering I'm already in trouble. So far I've experienced no problems with this design, and the result has been positive. It's another alternative to consider if you're looking for a used bike and can only locate ones with the standard height suspension.

    The factory lowered models also come with shorter sidestand and centerstand, something that I don't have (but would like to have..)

    The R12R is certainly capable of gravel road use, and even soft-sand road use (which I did sort of by mistake - about 10 miles of NJ pinelands sand road.) There is a chap on ADVRider (LostRider, aka Joe Finn) who regularly takes his R12R to places GS riders are hesitant to go.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  3. #3
    Ed Kilner #176066
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Mississauga, ON
    Posts
    489

    Watch the knee angle

    I have a 1200RT, standard suspension, and low seat. In the beginning, seat in low position, I had some hip cramps and knee pain.

    Installed the Suburban Machinery peg lowering kit. Hip cramps went away, except after weeks off the bike, but they go away quickly.

    Knee pain much reduced, due I think to knee angle. On longer trips, putting the low seat in the high position just about eliminates the issue. Quite subtle change in knee angle really affects me.

    When customizing my 'Stich, I had 1.5 inches removed above the knee for proper fit. This may explain why I am sensitive to knee angle.

    Does this relate to your issues at all?

    Also, I sat on a lowered suspension bike at the dealer - would be a disaster for me as the knee angle was immediately felt to be too acute.
    Ed
    2011 R1200RT Thunder Gray Metallic; 2000 Triumph 900(sold)
    http://triumphantsblog.blogspot.ca/

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Long Grove IL
    Posts
    42
    I live in the Chicago area and Cyclewerks of Barrington has a 2013 Low suspension GS.

    They are great people to work with.

  5. #5
    Registered User Anyname's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Portsmouth, NH
    Posts
    732
    The standard seats on 2011 and newer R1200R bikes are already quite low. You may want to try one before you go with the lower suspension.
    BMW R bike rider, horizontally opposed to everything...

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    41

    How low can you go?

    Don't think you would go wrong with "R" but you might also want to consider one of the F series bikes. I'd curious to see what you choose because I'm kind of on the same quest.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    We live in a rustic cabin in Maine though our residence is in NH.
    Posts
    57

    Thanks

    Thanks so much to all of you for your input. I guess I will wait for the 2013 bikes to come out as I understand there will be more low models available. Looks like the R will be a good choice as well as the new F bikes. Think I will look at the 1200 GS low too.
    Bill Zeller
    06 R1200RT
    07 F650GS

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •