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Thread: Winter gloves

  1. #1
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Winter gloves

    I just picked up a pair of the BMW Pro Winter riding gloves, and I'm really impressed. I wore them on Friday for 30 miles of pouring 47 degree rain (without the heated grips on so I could evaluate their insulation) and my hands stayed warm and dry.

    The local dealer (Ride West BMW in Seattle) had a "Black Friday" sale, with 20% off gloves and other apparel and accessories. MSRP is $145.

    Yesterday morning, my son and I went for a 95 mile ride, with temperatures between 34 and 42 degrees. After several hours of riding through chilly weather, my hands never got cold. The cold air and high humidity caused lots of condensation to form on the screen, mirrors, handguards, etc., which kept a steady stream of moisture flowing across the gloves. Gloves stayed warm and dry throughout.

    I picked the "Pro Winter" gloves as I already have a pair of BMW's "Pro Summer" gloves that fit and work perfectly. Just like the "Pro Summer", the "Pro Winter" gloves fit my hands like, well, like gloves. I'm unable to find a pair of Rev'it gloves that fit my hands, but the BMW gloves fit me perfectly.

    This is the first time I've bought winter riding gloves, as I've always used my summer Aerostich elkskin ropers year-round under the handlebar covers on the RTP. When I'm on the GSA, I don't have handlebar covers - so a warm and dry glove is now a requirement.

    I think I've found the perfect cold and wet weather riding glove!

    http://www.ascycles.com/detail.aspx?ID=47822
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  2. #2
    Just me rad's Avatar
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    I must admit, I like BMW gloves. I have the pro summer H2O proof gloves. I think that is what they are called. They are very nice.

  3. #3
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rad View Post
    I must admit, I like BMW gloves. I have the pro summer H2O proof gloves. I think that is what they are called. They are very nice.
    I like some of the BMW gloves very much. Others have missed the boat entirely, but when I need new gloves, I always check the BMW offerings first. Of course, my closest BMW dealer only sells Held gloves.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  4. #4
    100,000+ miler 32232's Avatar
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    The BMW Pro Summer gloves are the best I've ever had. With a pair of silk glove liners and heated grips they're comfortable down into the 40's and truly waterproof.

    I got the Airflow gloves this summer and the Pittards waterproof leather is amazingly comfortable.

    I'm truly impressed by the BMW gloves.
    Dave

    '06 Triumph Scrambler (Trans-Labrador veteran)

  5. #5
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 32232 View Post
    I got the Airflow gloves this summer
    Those I can do without. Still haven't found mesh that I like and you REALLY don't wanna know how many pairs of gloves I own.

    But on the bright side, I have winter and rain, and all else under control. In general, I like BMW gloves better than their bikes.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  6. #6
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Ski Gloves:)

    I have found my last several sets of Winter gloves at SKI Shops. Most are water proof and much less expensive than m/c shop gloves. My favorite at present is a three finger one I found last year. KOBI Brand and warm to well below freezing on the bike and even has a mini thermometer built into its backhand side. Other one has a compass, same place, both under a flap. Neat. Randy

  7. #7
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    I have found my last several sets of Winter gloves at SKI Shops. Most are water proof and much less expensive than m/c shop gloves. My favorite at present is a three finger one I found last year. KOBI Brand and warm to well below freezing on the bike and even has a mini thermometer built into its backhand side. Other one has a compass, same place, both under a flap. Neat. Randy
    I'm a skier. I used to go through ski gloves like crazy - I never got more than one or two seasons out of a pair of ski gloves. Then I discovered ice climbing gloves. Much more durable than plain old boring ski gloves, and still designed to keep hands warm and dry in atrocious conditions. They also have padded fingers and knuckles for errant ice ax/hammer blows.

    I thought my Black Diamond ice climbing gloves were the best made/most durable glove I'd ever see. Then I picked up the BMW ProWinter gloves. They are like the Black Diamond ice climbing gloves on steroids. More warmth, better padding, longer gauntlet, better fit, better "pre-curve" for holding on to handlebars/ski poles, and a better built-in grip on the palms.

    I'm thinking my new BMW ProWinter gloves might also be my new ski gloves...
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  8. #8
    Registered User twinsig's Avatar
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    I've been looking at powered glove liners, and it seems maybe i should look into a simple winter glove. By the way. What about your feet/toes, any socks recommended?
    Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch
    Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote

  9. #9
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twinsig View Post
    I've been looking at powered glove liners, and it seems maybe i should look into a simple winter glove. By the way. What about your feet/toes, any socks recommended?
    Definitely give winter gloves, possibly enhanced with those cheap thin "glove liners" a try before you invest in heated gloves or glove liners, especially if you don't ride much below the freezing point. Heated gloves may be a necessity if you ride in really cold temps, but I own a pair which work well, but are pain both from the hookup procedure and lack of control feel.

    Ideally, you should buy gloves at a local store with the option of quickly returning them. After being very impressed with Held Steve 2's, still my favourite summer glove, I bought a pair of Held "Warm N. Dry" in the same size by mail. Perfect fit for me and they are warm and dry. With those thin liners they work down to freezing without heated grips or other hand protection.

    Can't compare them to the BMW gloves as I never had a chance to try on a pair. Very likely that the quality is equivalent. Also very likely that one brand will fit your hand better than another.

    No great tips for your feet; I just use my BMW All-round boots and a couple pairs of good socks - and my feet do get cold after an hour of riding in around freezing temps. If I did this a lot, I would definitely look at a pair of insulated boots rather than electrics just to avoid that PIA factor of plugging in, adjusting temperature, and unplugging.

    Heated jacket liners (with a thermostat) are great from cold to cool temps, but I am not enthralled with heated gloves and I haven't tried the heated garments for below the waist, nor plan to.

    But you may be different.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  10. #10
    John. jstrube's Avatar
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    I bought heated glove liners. Trouble is, my gloves are too tight. I have some Tourmaster winter gloves & my hands/fingers get cold. I think I will try either the Held rain gloves, or the BMW winter gloves. Not sure which one. I would rather have a dry glove without insulation & just turn up the heat as needed vs. getting too hot & having to change gloves. I dunno... options, options.
    John.

  11. #11
    Registered User boxerkuh's Avatar
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    I have been riding with the BMW Pro Winter glove for a few seasons. I love them. I bought them unsale for $85.00 and I am always looking for another pair at the right price. Wear them with silk liner and you are good to the 20's without heated grips....
    Keep the rubber side down!!
    1986 R 80 RS
    1992 R 100 R
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  12. #12
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    For whatever reason, I'm morally opposed to heated gear.

    Maybe it's because I've been skiing for 35 years without heated clothing. I know how to properly layer with the proper layers to avoid the cold.

    Whether I'm skiing or riding in cold weather, I start with wicking non-cotton base layers. I prefer Patagonia's "Capeline". I have Capeline long-johns, Capeline long-sleeve undershirts, Capeline zip-neck shirts, Capeline sock liners, & even Capeline boxer shorts.

    Over the wicking layer goes the first layer of polarfleece. Wal-Mart fleece won't work. Spend the money and get real polarfleece. If it's super-cold, I'll wear a couple of fleece layers. My top fleece layer - particularly important for the upper body - is windproof fleece.

    On top of the fleece goes the waterproof/windproof layer. For skiing, it's the Arcteryx Alpha SV Gore-Tex jacket and bibs. For riding, it's the Aerostich Roadcrafter suit.

    Follow these guidelines and you won't ever need heated gear.
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by OfficerImpersonator View Post
    For whatever reason, I'm morally opposed to heated gear.

    Maybe it's because I've been skiing for 35 years without heated clothing. I know how to properly layer with the proper layers to avoid the cold.

    Whether I'm skiing or riding in cold weather, I start with wicking non-cotton base layers. I prefer Patagonia's "Capeline". I have Capeline long-johns, Capeline long-sleeve undershirts, Capeline zip-neck shirts, Capeline sock liners, & even Capeline boxer shorts.

    Over the wicking layer goes the first layer of polarfleece. Wal-Mart fleece won't work. Spend the money and get real polarfleece. If it's super-cold, I'll wear a couple of fleece layers. My top fleece layer - particularly important for the upper body - is windproof fleece.

    On top of the fleece goes the waterproof/windproof layer. For skiing, it's the Arcteryx Alpha SV Gore-Tex jacket and bibs. For riding, it's the Aerostich Roadcrafter suit.

    Follow these guidelines and you won't ever need heated gear.
    I used to think like that. Then I tried heated gear. It's a lot easier, safer, and more comfortable to have a single base layer, a heated liner, and a jacket (or base layer and heated pants). There's no bulk to it, and it makes it much easier to move around and handle the bike.

    Plus, you don't have to worry about adding or removing layers if your ride takes you from 10 degree temperatures to 40 degree temperatures.

  14. #14
    John. jstrube's Avatar
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    That's what I like, feeling hot, turn it off, feeling cold, turn it up. I only worry about 3 layers, base, heat & outer. Sure cuts down the load & time off the bike changing clothes.
    John.

  15. #15
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    I own and use the Held Warm N Dry, Gerbingss G-3 electric and BMW Pro Winter gloves. Also have S-7 Barkbusters on my RT and K-GT to keep cold air off finger tips.

    Of those gloves, the Warm N Dry are the least effective at temps below 40 degrees- no surprise given their design. Surprisingly to me, there is little to choose between the other two for warmth though the G-3s are not waterproof so aren't ideal in the wet. I don't find electrics hard to hook up but maybe that's because I ride all year and am used to cold weather gear. If there is a better non-electric winter glove than the BMW one, I have no idea what it is and I've seen most of the usual stuff.

    The BMW Pro Summer glove is IMO not a true hot weather summer glove. Like any waterproof glove, the membrane makes it too hot in our summers. I put it in the same temperature category as my Held Steve's- which I still consider the best all aound glove for touring use at 45-75 degree temps due to the superior qualtiy leather used. For really hot I like the BMW air gloves though even they get a little hot in our summers- leading to sweaty hands. For extreme heat I've got a cheap set of Pakistan-made gloves with thinner leatther palms and fabric backs but they probably compromise protection some also. Also in my set are various uninsulated deeskin gloves (current makers use hides that are too thick- these are not as good as the deerskin gloves of 30 years ago) and Held leather rmesh which are too short and uncomfortably irritating on the hands (unlined scratchy stuff all over te back of your hand)...

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