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Thread: work stands

  1. #16
    Dcompson
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    Who makes that lift?

  2. #17
    James.A
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dcompson View Post
    Who makes that lift?
    I took one of those out the door at Harbor Freight for $339 with the right combination of coupons. You would want to drill and fit eye-bolts on the corners, and USE them with ratchet straps. I am going to fab up some outriggers for the frame.

  3. #18
    Dcompson
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    Thanks for the info, it's now on my list.

  4. #19
    Registered User amiles's Avatar
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    The hydraulic lift table is by far the best choice. Strong, stable, continuously variable height adjustment. I park my bike on my lift so as to economize on space. If this doesn't work for you, I wouldn't be surprised if you could park your car over it to save space as well.

    My only gripe is that with my faired bike I have yet to find a good way to align the front tire with the chock while pushing the machine onto the stand. Second & third attempts wear me out.

  5. #20
    Registered User dmftoy1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amiles View Post
    The hydraulic lift table is by far the best choice. Strong, stable, continuously variable height adjustment. I park my bike on my lift so as to economize on space. If this doesn't work for you, I wouldn't be surprised if you could park your car over it to save space as well.

    My only gripe is that with my faired bike I have yet to find a good way to align the front tire with the chock while pushing the machine onto the stand. Second & third attempts wear me out.
    Don't know if it'd help or not but two parallel lines straight down table from edges of chock really helped me.

    FWIW - you can get a $299 coupon for the HF lift out of pretty much any motorcycle magazine. (American Iron, Cycle World, etc)

    I've got a handy lift and it took me a bit to bite the bullet but I wish I had done it years ago

  6. #21
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    Lights

    I have a lift should have gotten one years ago. Anyway, slight change of subject. My problem is I can't see,not enough light and tired of dragging around a trouble light. Anybody have a good setup ? Would like to see some.

  7. #22
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    My problem is I can't see,not enough light and tired of dragging around a trouble light.
    I know this will seem obvious, but they really do work well in the shop; never a shadow, and the light is where you need it. Mine has incandescent, LED, and red.

    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  8. #23
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    Good idea

    Quote Originally Posted by Lmo1131 View Post
    I know this will seem obvious, but they really do work well in the shop; never a shadow, and the light is where you need it. Mine has incandescent, LED, and red.

    Thanks never thought of that.

  9. #24
    One big Oaff brewmeister's Avatar
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    I got quartz halogen lights from Menards.They are 4 footers and are 750 watts on low or 1500 watts on high you change pulling a chain out of the fixture. They work in cold temps unlike those 4 foot neon tube lights.There are two per fixture and the bulbs are replacable .You get a very bright white light that leaves little to no shadow and you can aim them up and down by 60 degrees.I've no problems with them for over 10 years using them and I only changed the bulbs once.
    81 R100RT

  10. #25
    Earache
    Guest
    I welded this one up in about 2 hours;




    Cost was around $75 for the steel, with the top plate costing the majority of that. It's much lighter weight that a wooden equivalent and can be stored standing up on one end like this;


    We use it as a build stand at the shop where I keep my welding equipment. A scissor jack is used under the bike when needed.

  11. #26
    Registered User krpntr's Avatar
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    Mt Vernon WA
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    shop lights

    I got lucky and found a pair of light trees at a thrift store for about $10 dollars. They each have two light fixtures about 18" apart , stand about four feet high on a telescoping pole with three folding legs splayed out from a point close to the bottom. Originally, when they came from whatever big box store, they had 500 w halogen bulbs, but those fixture parts were removed by the PO and a standard light socket was installed. They now run those new twisty fluorescent bulbs that use very little electricity. They are easy to move and you don't have to hold them. They never overheat or cause fires. (like I had happen on the job with a halogen bulb many years ago.)

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