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Thread: What's a Good Starter Bike?

  1. #31
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Another one to consider might be the Suzuki 650 Savage (called something else on the "new" ones?), the single.
    Low, easy, cheap, reliable, more torque than many of the others mentioned.

  2. #32
    Registered User clowry's Avatar
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    People thought we were crazy, but when each of our 2 kids turned 16 we signed them up for the MSF course at our local college. Then we bought them a bike to ride. Our daughter started on a Suzuki Marauder 250. Our son is about a foot taller than her and it wouldn't fit him when the time came, so we traded it in on a Suzuki GS500. They both rode for a couple of years before getting a car license. We think it's made them much more aware behind the wheel.

  3. #33
    Motorcyclist patiodadio's Avatar
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    The Moto Guzzi Griso makes a nice starter bike for girls. Here is a link...http://www.motoguzzi-us.com/motorcyc...iso-8v-se.html
    tumblr_m62fsz0Dyj1qmvj2po1_1280.jpg
    ________________________________________
    The early bird might get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

  4. #34
    I'd rather be riding... spanky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdpc2 View Post
    I think that starting out on a mid-sized bike is foolish. It seems to me that there are an awful lot of ex-riders out there that would have stayed in motorcycling if they had started out on something smaller.

    If you go to some of the threads on ADVrider, you will see that there are many people that have gone back to smaller bikes and found the true joy of riding again. You don't need a 70hp bike to have a great time. Let her chose what she feels most comfortable on....
    Wow, pretty strong statement there. All I can offer is that my SO started out on a Yamaha XJ550 and almost seemingly quickly outgrew it. I was impressed with the bike as it had a lot of power for its size even with me astride. She then went to a XJ700 and now rides a R1100R quite well.

    Time on the 550; 2 years, the XJ700; 4 years. I bought her the R this July and she's in love (with the bike, too).

    I think that so much of getting a loved one started is listening to them, not pushing them in any way, and letting things happen naturally. Some folks find out that riding just isn't for them and that's okay.
    Regards,
    Randy
    '99 R1100R & '02 RT
    '06 K12s bumblebee

  5. #35
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
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    You can make all of the suggestions you want but let the decision be hers. It doesn't matter how good your choice is, if she does not make the final decision, she will never be happy with it down deep. I learned this through living with one woman almost 45 years and our girls of 42 and 39.

    We only think we matter but in the end, we are the sideshow.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  6. #36
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    The correct bike depends on who is riding it. I am in no way convinced a small bike is the best choice, and I'm tired of hearing that you should start that way. It depends entirely on the rider.

    Maybe nobody should start on a Hayabusa, but wtf am I to pass judgment.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  7. #37
    Minnesota Nice! braddog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by osbornk View Post
    You can make all of the suggestions you want but let the decision be hers. It doesn't matter how good your choice is, if she does not make the final decision, she will never be happy with it down deep. I learned this through living with one woman almost 45 years and our girls of 42 and 39.

    We only think we matter but in the end, we are the sideshow.
    Wise words...
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    Brad D. - Member #105766
    '77 R100RS - Black Beauty (big pipe, baby!)
    '94 R1100RS - Sylvia

  8. #38
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommcgee View Post
    The correct bike depends on who is riding it. I am in no way convinced a small bike is the best choice, and I'm tired of hearing that you should start that way. It depends entirely on the rider.

    Maybe nobody should start on a Hayabusa, but wtf am I to pass judgment.
    That depends significantly on whether or not it is your daughter who is the new rider. At least it would with me. The OP was asking about HIS daughter. I tried to think like I would if it was my daughter.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  9. #39
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    That depends significantly on whether or not it is your daughter who is the new rider. At least it would with me. The OP was asking about HIS daughter. I tried to think like I would if it was my daughter.
    My 27 year old daughter has her bike license. I bought her an MSF weekend four years ago and it poured down rain both days. She doesn't like the same kind of bikes I like (can't stand my K75 or KLX or Vstrom -- in that order), but to date, she has not picked one. It might have something to do with her working 3 jobs and lacking the time. Whatever she ultimately decides to ride is fine with me, though she does tend to favor cruisers.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  10. #40
    Jack Herbst
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    My wife started on a Harley Low Rider and never looked back. Great bike for the ladies. I t has a 24" seat and she flat foots easily.Low Low center of gravity. It was designed for smaller, shorter riders. Unlike all BMW's which we would all prefer our wives to ride, it is not ungodly tall with a high center of gravity. 1200 twin cam engine.

    Jack
    "All my life I wanted to be somebody. Now I realize I should have been more specific."

  11. #41
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaherbst View Post
    Unlike all BMW's which we would all prefer our wives to ride
    Brand loyalty mystifies me. I like certain bikes and the manufacturer doesn't matter at all. I know that's anathema to many around here, but I'll take the common ground that does exist.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  12. #42
    Registered User PittsDriver's Avatar
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    I would get her the biggest best most capable bike she can handle and assume she'll grow in to it. I think a lot of money is wasted on "starter" whatevers instead of buying the thing you really wanted/needed.
    Wes Jones
    Annapolis, MD
    2012 K1600GT, Vermillion Red
    2013 S1000RR, Granite Gray

  13. #43
    Registered User donbmw's Avatar
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    My advice is to have her take a Motorcycle training course for the learing of how to control a motorcycle. Then looke for a motorcycle of 400CC or larger to actual ride. She may find that she will want to go on longer trips than what she would on a 250cc bike.

    When I started riding my brother inlaw had started at the same time. He was able to use a friends 175 for learing and I was able to use it to. I then bought a 500cc bike and am glade I did. I was going every where on it and a small cc bike would not have worked except for just going around town.

    Don
    1975 R90/6, 1980 and 1982 R65, !959 TR3A Triumph Car

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by PittsDriver View Post
    I would get her the biggest best most capable bike she can handle and assume she'll grow in to it. I think a lot of money is wasted on "starter" whatevers instead of buying the thing you really wanted/needed.
    Really?

    Here's some of my resoning to start small-

    How do you know what she can handle before she even begins to ride?

    How many beginners get in over their head with something too powerful or too heavy or too tall for them and they crash or have multiple drops in the driveway and parking lots ?

    How many beginners feel intimidated from the beginning with something too heavy or tall and just give up?

  15. #45
    Dee G flymymbz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClassicVW View Post
    Really?

    Here's some of my resoning to start small-

    How do you know what she can handle before she even begins to ride?

    How many beginners get in over their head with something too powerful or too heavy or too tall for them and they crash or have multiple drops in the driveway and parking lots ?

    How many beginners feel intimidated from the beginning with something too heavy or tall and just give up?
    This.

    This is why I started out on a lowly Honda Rebel. No way in hell would I have ever been able to learn to ride on my Guzzi Cali EV. Or the R850. Had I not been able to learn to ride properly on a bike that I was comfortable on, I'd have given up a long time ago. Either from sheer frustration, or because I was seriously injured in an accident.
    Too damn many bikes to list

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