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Thread: BMW style accessory plug, Why?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JWMcDonald View Post
    The BMW DIN socket does fail (corrosion and lack of contact).
    I'm sure it can. I just said I've never had one fail.
    '03 R1150R, '03 F650GS, '97DR200SE,'78 Honda CT-90, '77Honda CT-90

  2. #17
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Easy View Post
    Es ist mir egal, or as they say in France Vive la diff?®rence.

    The difference does not start there, it begins there. The use of metric measurements is another difference, something the rest of the civilized world does (including the American scientific community - and interestingly enough the gangland dudes that use 9 mms.)

    The plug is widely used in Europe.

    E.
    Outside of the hardware store and most US Navy ships, the world is metric.
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  3. #18
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Outside of the hardware store and most US Navy ships, the world is metric.
    And the wheels on cars and the threads on spark plugs and socket wrenches.
    Kent Christensen
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  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    the threads on spark plugs and socket wrenches.
    ???

    Machinery Handbook says the SAE std sizes are

    M18x15, M14x1.25, M12x1.25, M10x1.0
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  5. #20
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    M18x1.5

    The British Standard also calls for metric threads, but only the 18mm and 14mm variants (which are preferred for new applications according to the SAE).

  6. #21
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    About 50 years ago there was a push to go metric in the US but certain political factions opposed. There was also a push to go with alternative energy about about 40 years ago but the same political factions opposed.
    Anthony S.
    2012 R1200GS

  7. #22
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    The real push in the U.S. came with the Carter administration. However, everything about the Carter administration failed.
    '03 R1150R, '03 F650GS, '97DR200SE,'78 Honda CT-90, '77Honda CT-90

  8. #23
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acejones View Post
    The real push in the U.S. came with the Carter administration. However, everything about the Carter administration failed.
    Actually, folks would be amazed at how much metrification has been adopted in the U.S. by science (almost totally) and industry (substantially). We don't even have newish cars (1997 and 1999) but many components on both our Ford and our Saturn are metric. Many things I buy at the hardware store wind up being metric. Almost everything that came from Asia is metric. Even setting the BMWs aside and not counting them, I use metric tools more often than ASA/SAE tools. The Whitworth tools, of course, haven't been touched in a couple of decades.

    Sure, we still use miles and U.S. gallons, but metrification is creeping into everybody's life by stealth. If U.S. industry doesn't adopt metric design they risk sacrificing huge parts of the market.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Actually, folks would be amazed at how much metrification has been adopted in the U.S. by science (almost totally) and industry (substantially).
    Antiquated machinery keeps SAE hardware in circulation and the Chinese do a fantastic job fabricating the necessary replacement parts.

    When you don't demand higher performance, the old machinery is fine and it's simply a matter of finding the cheapest parts supplier.
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  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JWMcDonald View Post
    The BMW DIN socket does fail (corrosion and lack of contact).
    So true. They turn green as brass(SAE's corrode too so nothings perfect here) is given to do. Best to grease the female socket . Also the powerlet is simply smaller so fits in/on the bikes better.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Actually, folks would be amazed at how much metrification has been adopted in the U.S. by science (almost totally) and industry (substantially). We don't even have newish cars (1997 and 1999) but many components on both our Ford and our Saturn are metric. Many things I buy at the hardware store wind up being metric. Almost everything that came from Asia is metric. Even setting the BMWs aside and not counting them, I use metric tools more often than ASA/SAE tools. The Whitworth tools, of course, haven't been touched in a couple of decades.

    Sure, we still use miles and U.S. gallons, but metrification is creeping into everybody's life by stealth. If U.S. industry doesn't adopt metric design they risk sacrificing huge parts of the market.
    Google: "going metric pays off" for a list of the many companies that were early(as in USA "early") metrification doers. I wrote a paper in 1973 when I went back to college at age 30 on this subject. At the time I was amazed @ the USA companies that were resistant to doing so ,even though it was sort of written on the wall. I will say that I don't believe in the guvment forcing the issue on business. Seems I recall that Caterpillar didn't go there at first then came around. Definite that longlife machines complicate that issue. Stupid never wins in business.
    Seems to me that the USA cig lighter accessories didn't fit the euro cars sockets too well at times-perhaps there were "bastard sized ones" in use?

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    Google: "going metric pays off" for a list of the many companies that were early(as in USA "early") metrification doers. I wrote a paper in 1973 when I went back to college at age 30 on this subject. At the time I was amazed @ the USA companies that were resistant to doing so ,even though it was sort of written on the wall. I will say that I don't believe in the guvment forcing the issue on business. Seems I recall that Caterpillar didn't go there at first then came around. Definite that longlife machines complicate that issue. Stupid never wins in business.
    Seems to me that the USA cig lighter accessories didn't fit the euro cars sockets too well at times-perhaps there were "bastard sized ones" in use?
    IMHO, the major hinderances to metrification in the US are 1) our lmilitary industruial complex which does not answer to international market forces and 2) antiquated power production machinery which is grandfathered to lenient performance standards.

    Stupid typically wins in business when it provides the maximum near term profits. Accordingly, running the same old machine using the lowest cost import parts is the cheapest way to bring product to the market. When the old machine finally dies, hopefully, some foreign company will provide the spiffy new high tech replacement, because the domestic suppliers disappeared, long ago. And, I mean a real domestic supplier, not someone with the rights to a nameplate and foreign production and design facilities.

    Relative to Caterpiller, it's an internationally diversified manufacturer.....it tailors product to individual markets and shifts production based on exchange rates.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acejones View Post
    The real push in the U.S. came with the Carter administration. However, everything about the Carter administration failed.
    I thought political posts were taboo on BMWMOA.
    Anthony S.
    2012 R1200GS

  14. #29
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    I doubt most would consider that political- more like a statement of fact re what history has concluded about Mr. Carter as president though he has surely done some superb thing since then (eg Habitat, election monitoring, etc)

    Actually, he did one thing that has made a number of our members here happy- he signed the bills that made homebrewing of beer legal in the US, which turned out to be a substantial driver of microbrews that have led to more beer variety for consumers...

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by sloride View Post
    I thought political posts were taboo on BMWMOA.
    Just let it go........ I serves no purpose to raise the issue.
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