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Thread: Touring bike with best miles per tank?

  1. #31
    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    The GTL, according to the specs, has a half gallon larger tank than the GL. .
    By GL, did you mean GoldWing or K16GT? If the latter, while the specs say the GT tank is smaller, in reality all of the U.S.-delivered GT's have had the same tank as the GTL's, so no difference there.
    Mark Neblett
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by PittsDriver View Post
    That was the case when the bike was first announced but then they went with the same tank on both models. All K1600GTs have the same tank capacity now as the GTL.
    Did both go with the 6.5 or 7.0 gallons and which year did they become the same size?

    -Don- Reno, NV

  3. #33
    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    Did both go with the 6.5 or 7.0 gallons and which year did they become the same size?

    -Don- Reno, NV
    They are both 26.5 L (~7.1 gallons). Been that way from day 1 in the US. There are only 2012 and 2013 models in the U.S. -- the bikes first released here in Spring 2011 were "2012" models.
    Mark Neblett
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mneblett View Post
    They are both 26.5 L (~7.1 gallons). Been that way from day 1 in the US. There are only 2012 and 2013 models in the U.S. -- the bikes first released here in Spring 2011 were "2012" models.
    Is the entire 7.1 gallons useable, or does it run out of gas before then, as some bikes do?

    BTW, if it's really exactly 26.5 liters, that comes out to . . .

    7.000559387490933 US gallons

    -Don- Reno, NV

  5. #35
    Rpbump USN RET CPO Rpbump's Avatar
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    Talking

    I've gotten 51mpg riding the back roads from Jacksonville, FL to Savannah, GA on my 2006 HD Softtail. The best my CLC did riding the same route was 44mpg. I weigh 265lbs and do not expect to get the same mileage as much lighter riders. Comparing mpg among riders is like comparing apples and oranges. Ride Safe
    Cave Contents: 1980 R100RT/Ural Sidecar, 2004 R1200CLC, 2006 HD FSXTI
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  6. #36
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonTom View Post
    Is the entire 7.1 gallons useable, or does it run out of gas before then, as some bikes do?

    BTW, if it's really exactly 26.5 liters, that comes out to . . .

    7.000559387490933 US gallons

    -Don- Reno, NV
    I've heard that last 0.000000000000003 gallon is just extra weight as it tends to cling to the fuel pickup tube.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rpbump View Post
    I've gotten 51mpg riding the back roads from Jacksonville, FL to Savannah, GA on my 2006 HD Softtail. The best my CLC did riding the same route was 44mpg. I weigh 265lbs and do not expect to get the same mileage as much lighter riders. Comparing mpg among riders is like comparing apples and oranges. Ride Safe
    nah, it's like comparing big apples to little apples; same basic thing, except for a variation in sizing. so of course you can compare mpgs across different rider weights, just factor down a percentage for the increased weight.
    the old adage was "10 lbs = 1 hp". (not sure how that compares as a %age of mpg, and its too early in the morning for my brain to want to do math- but its not like comparing suspension settings and handling characterstics across disparately sized riders.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  8. #38
    Cowboyatheart
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    Quote Originally Posted by PittsDriver View Post
    That was the case when the bike was first announced but then they went with the same tank on both models. All K1600GTs have the same tank capacity now as the GTL.

    To the folks that say that I haven't "learned to ride my bike right" because I'm getting poor gas mileage - I could say the same thing because you are. Neither would be correct though. I don't ride a motorcycle because it's an efficient way to get from one place to another. I ride because it's written in my DNA that I have to turn gasoline into fun and it's something I've been doing for nearly 4 decades. Fun to me means wearing the tires out on the edges first with tread left in the middle seeking out twisty roads and indulging in the intoxicating power of my K16 engine. Tires and gas are to be sacrificed and the greater the quantity the greater the fun.

    I would never say though that you're not riding your bike property if you're not doing that as well. There's enough room on the road for commuter bikes and dinner runs with granny on the back. Nothing wrong with that and if high mileage numbers make you smile then pump up on those hard rubber tires and set it to rain mode and enjoy!
    Nicely said.

    And I get over 300 miles on my RT routinely. The light comes on and I go further. Once I was so near empty, or so I thought, I did 50 miles at 50 mph praying I would make the next gas station. And I did make it and there was still gas to spare.
    Neil
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  9. #39
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Ran her dry!

    My '07GSA1200 has a 10 gallon tank from factory, so the 8.something book data is wrong. My bike has had a fuel strip reader issue a few times, but once failed on me and I was not paying attention, ran her dry. I preceeded to put 10 gallons in the tank, an even 10g.... I had gone over 400 miles, but not recommended if you like riding, not walking. I too have heard the newer GSAs get better mpg's, NOT confirmed. MY best has been mid 40s range(riding very conservatively), worst, mid 30s for mpg's, running hard in Texas at 80+ mph all day. I have griped constantly about poor gas mileage(GSAs), so maybe BMW is listening. My only fear is having to buy another 22000$+ motorcycle to get it. I have promised myself the answer is NO in that regard, so replacing my GSA1200 with another is out. Smaller bike? Maybe! Randy PS; EVEN my OLD R100/7 gets the low 40s for mpg's and NOT my new fangled, everything latest BMW/GSA. Backwards technolgy in a way? Even the latest BMWs still surge ahead with MORE HP and I continue asking WHY! I like performance, but put some conservative gas usage in there somewhere on the "bigger 1200cc and up bikes" too. Just maybe someday, before I quit riding. I already know the RTs and KLTs do it right, with all that faired surface. GSAs, no smoothness about them, BUT? I hear talk about the new ones and gas! Maybe just talk or???? Randy, getting carried away

  10. #40
    Mind is not for rent
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    At 80mph, 2-up & loaded, my GS/A will go 360+ miles per tank.

  11. #41
    George T'man A4Skyhawk's Avatar
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    K1200lt

    Like Saddleman, I generally get 50 mpg on my 05 KLT, riding two up. Best was 52, worst 47. Generally count on stopping at around 270 miles, sometimes the light has just come on, sometimes no light.

  12. #42
    2011 R1200RT ka5ysy's Avatar
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    Polarbear:

    Much of your problem with gas mileage has a lot to do with the simple fact that the GS and the GSA have horrible aerodynamics. The resulting air drag (parasitic drag in aircraft terms) causes you to use a lot of gas to push it through the air. Even the position and design of the windscreen will effect mileage. My RT computer shows about a 2-3mpg loss if I run the windscreen fully up as compared to fully down. The large top case is worth about 3-5 mph unless there is something sitting in the passenger seat to fill in the gap behind me.

    The other problem is that as a general rule, to double speed uses about four times the energy: you need a bunch of HP to push the beast faster and faster resulting in much more fuel consumption and way less gas mileage.

    Running fast on a big fat heavy bike with square bags uses a lot more gas compared with something like the RT which is very clean aerodynamically. At 80-85 MPH the computer on my Camhead RT is mostly showing 50mpg depending on load. A friend with the Camhead GSA usually is showing 35-40-ish running with me at those speeds. A friend who rides a K1600GTL gets 45-50 mpg running similar speeds.
    Last edited by ka5ysy; 11-09-2012 at 11:55 AM.
    Doug, 2011 R1200RT Polar Metallic
    MSF #127350 NAUI #36288

  13. #43
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ka5ysy View Post
    The other problem is that as a general rule, to double speed uses about four times the energy: you need a bunch of HP to push the beast faster and faster resulting in much more fuel consumption and way less gas mileage.
    The force required to overcome aerodynamic drag varies with the square of the velocity. The power varies with the cube of the velocity. It takes 8 times the horsepower to double the speed.

  14. #44
    2011 R1200RT ka5ysy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    The force required to overcome aerodynamic drag varies with the square of the velocity. The power varies with the cube of the velocity. It takes 8 times the horsepower to double the speed.
    Thanks for correcting that.... had a brain fart from lack of coffee
    Doug, 2011 R1200RT Polar Metallic
    MSF #127350 NAUI #36288

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