Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 36

Thread: Car info,r.e., 2013 BMW X3 xDrive28i

  1. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,223
    You have to jump into a 5 series to get a 6 now... Runflats are on a bunch of mfg's cars now too... BMW is said to be coming out with more diesels in the spring

  2. #17
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    4,765
    Here's what to know about runflat tires ...

    Yes, you can drive on them when they're deflated ...

    ... but, that ruins the tire and you'll have to replace it.

    Running on one that's flat is limited to 50 miles at 50 mph

    Runflat tires for your BMW are very likely only to be found at your BMW dealer or via mail order.

    Tire shops with special equipment to remove/install runflat tires are few and far between, likely nonexistent in rural areas.

    Runflats are hard riding.

    Runflats are expensive.

    Where I live I can easily be 100-200 miles from anybody capable of working with runflat tires let alone having any in stock. I can easily be 100 miles from a town of any kind.

    You can replace runflats with regular tires, but then you're faced with the fact the car was not designed with any space for a spare tire.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  3. #18
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,692
    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Here's what to know about runflat tires ...

    Yes, you can drive on them when they're deflated ...

    ... but, that ruins the tire and you'll have to replace it.

    Running on one that's flat is limited to 50 miles at 50 mph

    Runflat tires for your BMW are very likely only to be found at your BMW dealer or via mail order.

    Tire shops with special equipment to remove/install runflat tires are few and far between, likely nonexistent in rural areas.

    Runflats are hard riding.

    Runflats are expensive.

    Where I live I can easily be 100-200 miles from anybody capable of working with runflat tires let alone having any in stock. I can easily be 100 miles from a town of any kind.

    You can replace runflats with regular tires, but then you're faced with the fact the car was not designed with any space for a spare tire.
    With the newer 3-series being as big or larger than an older 5-series..........why don't they have any room for a spare???

    My next vehicle purchase will be a new or newer Tacoma when either the 89 525 or the 91 4x4 dies.........which might be a while
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  4. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,223
    On my 2008 328 sedan the space for the tire was filled with stuff that makes the car go-not a place for the tire. My 2010 Cadillac CTS has a "spare tire option" meaning a donut rather than a can of tire goop. Read my older posts awhile back,r.e. BMW runflats. They are crap on any car. Also not mentioned above,I'll ad that they have no jack or lug wrench in the cars either, even "IF"! you had a place for a spare. I'm not sure I understand this "having the right equipment" as I dismounted mine at my local hillbilly tire place? Pretty straight forward as I observed plus it's a process I'm very familiar with. The real issue was that my runflat "awakening" came with the fact that the tire was starting to disintegrate inside toward outside of carcass after only 50 miles & having kept it under 50 MPH as you're supposed too. That's not good! You could not touch the tire when I got home as too hot. Take my word they are crap.

  5. #20
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,692
    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    On my 2008 328 sedan the space for the tire was filled with stuff that makes the car go-not a place for the tire. My 2010 Cadillac CTS has a "spare tire option" meaning a donut rather than a can of tire goop. Read my older posts awhile back,r.e. BMW runflats. They are crap on any car. Also not mentioned above,I'll ad that they have no jack or lug wrench in the cars either, even "IF"! you had a place for a spare. I'm not sure I understand this "having the right equipment" as I dismounted mine at my local hillbilly tire place? Pretty straight forward as I observed plus it's a process I'm very familiar with. The real issue was that my runflat "awakening" came with the fact that the tire was starting to disintegrate inside toward outside of carcass after only 50 miles & having kept it under 50 MPH as you're supposed too. That's not good! You could not touch the tire when I got home as too hot. Take my word they are crap.
    It seems you solved the problem by buying the Cadillac.
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,223
    Now , among other things I'm searching for more "creature space". In the CTS, which is a very good(not great) road car, when you have the 2 cup holders in action it requires creative effort to place your sunglasses,spare keys,etc., out of your way!Many late model sedans have become cramped as such. I never hankered for an SUV but seem headed that way to get some space (and seems I like to sit up higher) as the "other car" is a truck which actually does everything except get better gas mileage & we have to have 2 cages.

  7. #22
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,692
    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    Now , among other things I'm searching for more "creature space". In the CTS, which is a very good(not great) road car, when you have the 2 cup holders in action it requires creative effort to place your sunglasses,spare keys,etc., out of your way!Many late model sedans have become cramped as such. I never hankered for an SUV but seem headed that way to get some space (and seems I like to sit up higher) as the "other car" is a truck which actually does everything except get better gas mileage & we have to have 2 cages.
    Fleetwoods are gone from the line-up?
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  8. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,223
    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Biggest question with BMW cars these days is can you live with run-flat tires?
    I'm hearing that the RFT tires are much better than in the past-of course that still doesn't solve the extreme high cost issue of the tires or the lack of a jack ,wrench & spare.

  9. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,223
    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Fleetwoods are gone from the line-up?
    I'm not a "Fleetwood" kind of guy! Never will be.
    I'm now looking hard @ doing the SC delivery program. A nice side benefit is that you can buy the car from any USA dealer (meaning get the best price via web/phone) & then I'm fairly close to SC for delivery in a very informational way-plus free hotel & meals-they get the $895 destination fee to play with either way!

  10. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,223
    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Yes, saving fuel and saving on cost of a gallon of fuel are mutually exclusive. High compression = efficiency. The legislation considers only the former.
    FWIW I did the math last night , comparing my CTS @ 24.5 mpg on regular/87 & the X3 28i 4cyl @ 30mpg(what others say they get hwy) on 89 mid grade. I used a 10 cents per gallon difference (which might be beaten at times) & using 12,000k per yr the X3 actually saves me several hundred $ per yr over my CTS due to better mpg. Of course the increased cost of the car negates any saving.

  11. #26
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Marion VA-In the middle of some of the best riding in the country.
    Posts
    3,277
    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    I'm not a "Fleetwood" kind of guy! Never will be.
    I'm now looking hard @ doing the SC delivery program. A nice side benefit is that you can buy the car from any USA dealer (meaning get the best price via web/phone) & then I'm fairly close to SC for delivery in a very informational way-plus free hotel & meals-they get the $895 destination fee to play with either way!
    I think you would really enjoy a SC delivery. I have toured the plant twice and watching them build them made me want to buy one. It's one amazing tour in addition to the training you will get with the purchase.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  12. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,223
    Quote Originally Posted by osbornk View Post
    I think you would really enjoy a SC delivery. I have toured the plant twice and watching them build them made me want to buy one. It's one amazing tour in addition to the training you will get with the purchase.
    It also opens the price search up to ANY DEALER! that makes you the best deal. My search is focused around Invoice plus $$$-incentives + dealer fees. Fees that I've seen recent dealer contacts : $95 to wash your new car, advertising fees which vary from 0 to lots$$$, clearcoat protection,undercoat, training fees, VIN etch, window tint, nitrogen, upholstery protection & the standby document fees which vary from 0 to $500+. This doesn't include the tire protection insurance, extended warranties & other stuff they try to sell you. I just cannot savy paying $500+ for filling out some papers, most of which are free from the government & all done by a clerk that is not all that highly paid in the first place. If I had that $$$ for all the stuff I've done paperwork on myself @ the clerks office...

    I'm wondering what the BMW money amounts to that the dealer gets besides the invoice factor? Also, I'm trying to find out if I qualify for the BMW "Loyalty Credit" with 3 BMW bikes & no BMW car? I've probably owned 30+ BMW cars over the yrs starting in 1969.

  13. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Posts
    2,119
    Have to agree run flats are not exactly forward progress in auto utility. All the problems noted are real. We dumped the run flats on the SOs 535, replaced with regular stuff and carry plug kits, etc. instead. Way prefer a real spare or even one of the dinky ones to a run flats.

    Older BMW 4 cyl motors were not exactly models of power and refinement- and hanging a turbo on one won't change its relative character. Have no direct experience with latest 4 cyl BMW versions but their neighbors at Mercedes make and use 4 cyl motors that could be right at home in tractors- they are far less refined than their 6 and 8 cyl motors. If big fuel savings are your thing, 4 cyl stuff is not necessarily the answer. Big fuel cost reductions will come only from stuff like hybrids, diesel, or significant weight reduction of a vehicle coupled with major aero improvement. The best real world change you're likely to get with a swap to 4 cyl turbo is less than 10% reduction compared to a 6 in same vehicle.

  14. #29
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    4,765
    It's all in increments of course.

    A four can be more economical simply because it's lighter.

    The key to efficiency in internal combustion engines is compression.

    Diesels are high compression and adding a turbo to a gasoline engine increases its compression as well.

    Remember, efficiency is defined as gallons used and NOT the cost of those gallons, and today's and tomorrow's efficient gasoline engines are going to require premium, i.e. more costly fuel. And will use less of it. There is NO knock sensor escape from this, despite lots of wishful thinking.

    Diesel fuel is the most expensive of all (it should be as it contains most power) but diesel engines use it most efficiently.

    Another thing in diesel's favor is the absence of pumping losses due to absence of a throttle. BMW handles this pretty well with gasoline engines with valvetronic, which eliminates the throttle, too, and changes engine speed by on-the-fly changes in valve lift and timing.

    Fours are back simply because displacements are decreasing while power per displacement measure is increasing (because of turbos). There's no sense in a four larger than, say, 2.5 liters, and very little sense in a six much smaller than 2.0 liters. Some of the big power boys like Corvette, Porsche, AMG, etc. are decreasing displacement for better economy by electronicly shutting off cylinders at times of less-than-maximum power requirement. They still carry the weight, of course.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  15. #30
    No longer a member here
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,432
    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    The key to efficiency in internal combustion engines is compression.

    Diesels are high compression and adding a turbo to a gasoline engine increases its compression as well.

    .
    Ever so slightly misleading statement as long as "compression" is not clearly defined. The "compression" which can also be commonly be referred to as "compression ratio" does not change with adding a turbo. It is a geometrical number that describes the ratio between the cylinder volume with piston at LDC and TDC.
    A different term is "mean effective pressure". This actually changes with a turbo and results in performance as it produces the force that pushes the piston downward.
    And Diesels have a high compression ratio, because they rely on self ignition of the fuel, which occurs when compressed above a certain level.
    The efficiency of Diesel engines isn't really because of the high "compression". It is because Diesel fuel has a higher specific gravity and thus a higher level of energy.
    Multi-fuel engines with adjustable compression ratios produce the highest performance output when run with engine oil, like 10W30.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •