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Thread: Motorcycle carrying trailer?

  1. #1
    Registered User Beemer01's Avatar
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    Motorcycle carrying trailer?

    As I live in ultra flat Chicago and you have to ride for hours of frankly boring freeways to get to riding that is interesting, I'm toying with the idea of a small trailer to put the Beemer on and drive in some comfort with the bike in tow.

    At the risk of sounding like a HD rider - does anyone have any suggestions on brands and models?

    This looks interesting - http://theusatrailerstore.com/produc...k-wheelie.html

    I love great riding, I'm just tired of riding a day to get there!

  2. #2
    Minnesota Nice! braddog's Avatar
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    Depending on how often you think you'd use it, consider just renting as needed. You can rent a trailer at Uhaul or other rental places several times over for what you'd pay for an equivalent trailer. You also don't have to store it.
    -----------------------------------------
    Brad D. - Member #105766
    '77 R100RS - Black Beauty (big pipe, baby!)
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  3. #3
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    I trailer one or two bikes behind the motorhome all the time. I have, and have had many trailers through the years. Most all the manufactures use a Dexter axle but there are a few others. You didn't mention what your vehicle is but that and the trailer hitch kinda determines what your limitations are. Generally the largest trailer you feel comfortable with will be a good start as it will be the easiest to tow and back-up. With today's smaller vehicles, the trailer would probably be 5'X8' or 6'X10' in deck size, get as large a wheel as you can but in this size it will probably be a 13" wheel. As far as the GVW (gross vehicle weight) either 2000 or 2990. Over 3000 lbs GVW usually gets into having to have a title and increases the expense.
    If you want to go all out, there are some nice enclosed trailers which also serve as a great place to store the bike and even a place to sleep in when you get there. Good luck. OM
    btw, I myself would skip the one wheel in the air thing in your link for any kind of long distance use.
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
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  4. #4
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    If you're towing with a smaller vehicle, Aluma makes nice lightweight trailers.







    http://www.alumaklm.com/products.html
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  5. #5
    Registered User Jim Rogers's Avatar
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    I agree with Braddog, that renting is the way to go if you are only going to trailer a bike a couple of times a year. But do a cost-benefit analysis. Also, consider all the other uses you will find for a trailer. I used to be one of those guys who said he would never be without a pickup. Now, I am one who says he will never be without a trailer. I bought a used Kendon Dual Rail that gets more use as a flat deck utility trailer than an MC trailer. It is small, storable, and maneuverable with both the T&C van and a trailer dolly. It can carry one ton of cargo on a torsion bar suspension, does not require special licensing or electric brakes, has locking wheel chocks, blah, blah, blah. I also agree with Omega Man and not use the ÔÇÿwheel draggerÔÇÖ for anything other than short runs as well as if you decide to get a trailer, get one that will carry everything you think you will haul with a cushion for extra capacity.
    Gear Up and Ride Safe
    Jim Rogers
    2010 R12GSA aka Heidi
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  6. #6
    RK Ryder
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    I have two flat bed trailers, one similar to a trailer-in-a-bag. Last week I had need to move some wood for my son, some 60 miles away. I simply drove up, rented a U-Haul, took his scrap wood to the dump and then returned the trailer. I told myself that I should have done this years ago.

    However, if I could go back in time and get my first trailer, it would definitely have walls so that it would easily be available for other uses besides transporting my bikes from home to a dealer and back.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
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  7. #7
    Registered User Jim Rogers's Avatar
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    Bought a Waste Management Bagster for use when I need to capture stuff. No side walls needed.
    Gear Up and Ride Safe
    Jim Rogers
    2010 R12GSA aka Heidi
    Yorktown, Va

  8. #8
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    If you're towing with a smaller vehicle, Aluma makes nice lightweight trailers.





    http://www.alumaklm.com/products.html
    There you go- a first class trailer that will do many things.
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200
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  9. #9
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    Something like Lee is showing will do the job and is usually comfortably affordable, especially if you are travelling short distances in good weather. Storage is a problem even if you find one that you can fold up.

    I looked for a long time and finally gave up due to the limitations, poor suspension and handling characteristics of flatbed utility trailers. I bought an enclosed Wells Cargo cycle wagon, expensive - yes, requires rented offsite storage - yes, but, incredibly stable on the road even when in a cross wind, very easy to load and lock down the bike, out of sight and secure for overnight travel and the bike is all weather protected.

    Was the purchase good value, nope, only use it in the fall to transfer the RT from the frozen north to the sunny south and return in the spring and I pay $75.00/month all year to store it and further $70.00/month while it sits in the sunny south.

    Unless you have another use for a trailer, any trailer, I think renting is good.

  10. #10
    Registered User miairhead's Avatar
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    Not a BMW

    I think I read in Motorcycle Consumer News about these, the drive shaft equipped motorcycle can not be towed with one of those was the conclusion.

    I used a 5 by 10, to take motorcycle down to ride when my wife was with me. She does not ride, and I was going to. (she got to visit, I got to ride).

    I installed a winch with a remote, to pull the MC up slowly and it worked very well.
    I think I sell that open one and look for a enclosed unit.
    Tom
    '84 R100RT '04 CLC(gone) Honda NT700V
    BMW
    Beer Motorcycles Women

  11. #11
    07 R1200GS Rich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoRThwind View Post
    Unless you have another use for a trailer, any trailer, I think renting is good.
    It's not until you own a trailer that you realize you can use it for so many things. I have a couple of trailers, an Aluma like the one pictured, and an enclosed 6X12 cargo trailer. If I'm not using them, someone is. I really need to start charging rent.

    Seriously, trailers haul motorcycles, leaves, lumber, insulation, dirt, you name it. The nice thing about the Aluma is the lightness, I pull mine behind my ATV at times when doing yard things. So many uses.....

  12. #12
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    Talking

    Two kind of people in this world; those who own cargo trailers and those who want to borrow them.
    Last edited by AKBeemer; 10-20-2012 at 02:55 PM.
    Kevin Huddy
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  13. #13
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    Here's another option for a motorcycle trailer

    http://www.stingertrailer.ca/
    Walter

    G. K. Chesterton wrote - "The traveller sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he came to see."

  14. #14
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    I think the utility of owning vs renting a trailer primarily depends on the ability to store it conveniently. When we lived in Kansas we had 5 acres so parking the trailer beside the shop was no issue. Here in Texas we have 12 acres and parking a trailer is not an issue.

    Nobody needs one more thing in their way, so then buying and storing vs renting comes into play. I use our trailer for many things but mostly bike rescue or utility use. Where we live it would be a 120 mile drive to go rent a trailer, and a 120 mile drive to return it. Renting is not a good option here. That would not be the case for the OP in the Chicago area.

    If a person has a place to conveniently park the trailer out of the way, and wants some versatility then I think the smaller "landscape" trailers with about 12" siderails and a built in loading ramp makes the most sense for versatility. But one of the more "trick" folding of standup models might work best for just bike hauling if parking space is at a premium.

    I bought my trailer in 1992 for $350. I've had plenty of space to park it at zero cost. It has been well worth it. If I had to pay $75 a month ($900/yr) to parki it some place I probably wouldn't own it. Folks who break down in the Big Bend would just have to find their own way to haul their bike.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  15. #15
    100,000+ miler 32232's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    If a person has a place to conveniently park the trailer out of the way, and wants some versatility then I think the smaller "landscape" trailers with about 12" siderails and a built in loading ramp makes the most sense for versatility.
    I have a 5x8 utility trailer that is set up with removable "Pingel" wheel chocks. It's light enough I towed it with 4 cylinder Subarus for many years.

    In addition to bike hauling, it can be lined with a poly tarp to pick up a yard of compost for the garden, move machinery or anything else. It will do anything a pickup will do but because of the low deck height, it is far easier to load a bike than into a pickup. It then allows a lot more latitude for the type of tow vehicle you want.

    The model I have is inexpensive and made by a small local factory. It is the same as the picture, but instead of the fixed ramp has a pair of loading rails that can store under the deck. Virtually no wind resistance that way.

    Dave

    '06 Triumph Scrambler (Trans-Labrador veteran)

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