Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 29 of 29

Thread: 2004 R1150RT Longevity

  1. #16
    Registered User redsledrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    West Mansfield, Ohio
    Posts
    121
    I had time to think about this. It would be TheseusÔÇÖ Ship until he sold it. Kinda like the question Which came first the chicken or the egg... Silly the rooster did. hehe
    84 Honda 700S Nighthawk
    95 R1100RS

  2. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    69
    Type of riding and riding style can also effect reliability and longevity. My job has me driving a lot of miles in my car and I routinely keep them until 350K. Being all highway miles is easier on an engine and transmission compared to a vehicle that is used on short commutes and is constantly run outside of the operating temperature. I do believe that both in the motorcycle world and the car world certain brands are more reliable than others: Toyota, Honda, BMW, etc. I don't know if this applies to ships.

  3. #18
    Delaware.Dave
    Guest
    Knowing their potential longevity, that's why I bought my 1999 R1100RT in December 2010, with only 12K miles on it. I figured that is practically brand new. In two years, I've enjoyed it up to 21130 miles.

    The best part is it has a scratch in the paint near the windshield. Why is that good? Because I don't have to worry about it getting scratched now. Nobody cares about the second scratch!

    The bike has been fun, and getting better all the time.

  4. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1

    R1150RT Reliability

    I have a chance to buy a nice R1150RT, but am scared to death when I read about $3000 ABS repairs and $2600 transmission input shaft/clutch hub failure repairs, etc. Some of the ABS failures have reportedly resulted in some nasty crashes. Should I be apprehensive of a low mileage, well maintained bike with no apparent problems at the moment?

  5. #20
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,942
    Quote Originally Posted by forester@unitedtimber.com View Post
    I have a chance to buy a nice R1150RT, but am scared to death when I read about $3000 ABS repairs and $2600 transmission input shaft/clutch hub failure repairs, etc. Some of the ABS failures have reportedly resulted in some nasty crashes. Should I be apprehensive of a low mileage, well maintained bike with no apparent problems at the moment?
    No
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  6. #21
    Rally Rat
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    123
    Quote Originally Posted by forester@unitedtimber.com View Post
    I have a chance to buy a nice R1150RT, but am scared to death when I read about $3000 ABS repairs and $2600 transmission input shaft/clutch hub failure repairs, etc. Some of the ABS failures have reportedly resulted in some nasty crashes. Should I be apprehensive of a low mileage, well maintained bike with no apparent problems at the moment?
    Don't be scared. If it's well maintained you won't regret it.

  7. #22
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    "Big Bend" TX
    Posts
    8,648
    Quote Originally Posted by 175781 View Post
    It's relative. A bike with a master mechanic attached, but retaining proportionately few original parts isn't what everyone has in mind, though it's undeniably cool. But a bike that never needs service isn't realistic. Somewhere in the middle is nice.
    You folks would be surprised how few replacement parts are on Voni's R1100RS at 370K miles or my R1150R at 170K miles. Her transmission was replaced under warranty in the early years. I replaced a cam follower. It got a valve job at 300K, and had a broken cam chain guide replaced. Alternator brush holder/regulator a couple of times and one driveshaft at 200K or so. Batteries, of course - and brake disks once. Oh, and a clutch or two.

    My R1150 at 170K has had brake pads and shocks, one regulator, a driveshaft, and brake disks. Oh - and a throttle body on the right side.

    It isn't about needing to replace parts. It is all about careful routine and preventive maintenance by the book. Anybody can buy the book and most can learn to follow it.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  8. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    271
    I have a chance to buy a nice R1150RT, but am scared to death when I read about $3000 ABS repairs and $2600 transmission input shaft/clutch hub failure repairs, etc. Some of the ABS failures have reportedly resulted in some nasty crashes. Should I be apprehensive of a low mileage, well maintained bike with no apparent problems at the moment?
    Good maintenance will prevent most problems from occurring. The R1150RT is very easy to work on. You can download the factory manual on-line, as well as, other maintenance instructions. There are local clubs that also have Maintenance Days where you can learn how to do it properly.

    If you are unfortunate and end up with an ABS repair or Transmission problem, there are plenty of used parts available. There is also a location where you can have the ABS repaired for a fraction of the cost of the $3,000 you quoted. Good used transmissions can be found in $500-600 range.

    For the most part, BMW bikes are very reliable. No matter what brand/model you buy there are always daemons and common problems.

    You also have to remember that there are 34,000 BMWMOA members ripping up asphalt. Just because you read about a problem here-or-there on the forum doesn't mean that you will have the same problem. I call it the "Forum Breakdown Syndrome". Just because something unfortunate happen to John Doe doesn't mean that you will have the same problem.

    I wouldn't hesitate for a second to buy the R1150RT. If you are still unsure, take a picture and post it on the forum. Let members make suggestions of what to look for. Or, get another MOA member to look at it with you. The oilheads have a small list of problems. Most can be prevented or easily fixed.

  9. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    77
    Might be a little off topic in regards to longevity, but with every 4 cycle motor/motorcycle I've ever owned my goal was good maintenance and also to try to keep rpm's as low as necessary to successfully complete the task at hand (while not lugging the engine). From early trail bikes, cars, trucks and tractors this is the way I was taught and this methodology has served me well to ensure motor longevity.
    I have followed a number of threads dealing with BMW rpms and most leave me with more questions then answers. My 041150RT seems most happy between 3200 and 3600 rpm. I see many posts saying that these bikes like higher rpms and that by running your bike at lower rpms you are asking for trouble in the long run.

    Am I doing a disservice to my bike by constantly running between 3200 & 3600?
    04 R1150RT

  10. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Northern Front Range, CO
    Posts
    6,417
    Quote Originally Posted by mhuf View Post
    Might be a little off topic in regards to longevity, but with every 4 cycle motor/motorcycle I've ever owned my goal was good maintenance and also to try to keep rpm's as low as necessary to successfully complete the task at hand (while not lugging the engine). From early trail bikes, cars, trucks and tractors this is the way I was taught and this methodology has served me well to ensure motor longevity.
    I have followed a number of threads dealing with BMW rpms and most leave me with more questions then answers. My 041150RT seems most happy between 3200 and 3600 rpm. I see many posts saying that these bikes like higher rpms and that by running your bike at lower rpms you are asking for trouble in the long run.

    Am I doing a disservice to my bike by constantly running between 3200 & 3600?
    disservice? probably not (accepting your notation of never lugging it). but you really aren't doing it any big favors, either. take it out and play with it, at least once in awhile. you might be (pleasantly) surprised at the level of performance you can get from it, while still being totally safe with your motor.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  11. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    77
    I do occasionally get on it and continue to be surprised and impressed by what this bike can do, and how effortlessly it seems to do it.
    04 R1150RT

  12. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Diamondhead, MS
    Posts
    1,054
    I think oil heads are happier and more responsive above 3000 rpm.
    '03 R1150R, '03 F650GS, '97DR200SE,'78 Honda CT-90, '77Honda CT-90

  13. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    646
    Definitely should keep it over 3000. You haven't even yet felt the power it has at 3000.

  14. #29
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Just north of Seattle, WA
    Posts
    2,806
    I have a 2002 RTP, identical to yours except yours is the "twin-spark" and mine has one spark plug per cylinder.

    Mine was never in police service, and I acquired it used with 23,000 miles on the odometer in June, 2007. She now has just under 80,000 miles on the odometer.

    I've had to replace my clutch input shaft twice. Mine is apparently one of the few with the engine case/transmission case misalignment issue. Aside from that, the bike has been relatively trouble-free.

    I'm fairly certain a prior owner either tried to work on the ABS system himself, or he used a non-BMW mechanic to work on the ABS system, as it took two visits to the independent BMW shop to chase all the gremlins out of the myriad hydraulic brake lines.

    I've added a 2012 GSA to the garage, so the RTP doesn't get ridden every day, but when it's dark, wet, and cold, the RTP is my first choice for my daily commute.
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •