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Thread: 2004 R1150RT Longevity

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    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
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    2004 R1150RT Longevity

    Having recently passed 40K (and having survived 6 weeks of diagnosing a phantom electrical problem that turned out to be wires separating at the very base of the ignition switch), I have settled back into roughly 500 miles per week. What sort of longevity, mileage wise, should I expect from this model? I'd like to run it up to 100K, but won't hesitate to switch to a newer and/or lower mileage model if I start leaving a trail of parts.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

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    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    My '04 R1150RT-P has 95K on it, much of which was not-gentle California Highway Partol use. Until I took her apart last month to do a "mid-life refresh," she was doing daily commuting duty in DC just fine.
    Mark Neblett
    Fairfax, VA
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    Sign Guy Bdiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mneblett View Post
    My '04 R1150RT-P has 95K on it, much of which was not-gentle California Highway Partol use. Until I took her apart last month to do a "mid-life refresh," she was doing daily commuting duty in DC just fine.
    My RT was a CHP bike till about 54K and I changed my clutch this summer with 110K and now my FD has gone belly up (well thats what I think). I ride mine daily to commute and it doesn't burn oil or leak. Fires up first try, everything works. Taken me all over the country.

    I'm thinking your bike is a baby with only 40K on it.
    Brian - Everett, WA
    www.pdq-signs.com
    99 R1100RT - Got Kewl-Aid? IBA - SS1K's, BBG
    I started out with nothing and I still have most of it left!

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    Figuring high mileage on these bikes is tough. Voni only has 365,00+ miles on her RS, so we really don't know yet if they can handle hi miles.
    however, i'm thinking that your RT with 40K miles can probably manage a few more before you put it out to pasture.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  5. #5
    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
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    It's relative. A bike with a master mechanic attached, but retaining proportionately few original parts isn't what everyone has in mind, though it's undeniably cool. But a bike that never needs service isn't realistic. Somewhere in the middle is nice.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

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    just hangin' out 2bikemike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mneblett View Post
    My '04 R1150RT-P has 95K on it, much of which was not-gentle California Highway Partol use. Until I took her apart last month to do a "mid-life refresh," she was doing daily commuting duty in DC just fine.
    What exactly is a "mid life refresh"? On another note I suspect all BMWs' will go 300,00 miles with enough money thrown after them.
    keep it light enough to travel.....
    '04 R1150RT
    '81 Honda CB650 Custom

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    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
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    Or all motorcycle's, for that matter. The key is to get there without testing Theseus' paradox.


    Quote Originally Posted by 2bikemike View Post
    What exactly is a "mid life refresh"? On another note I suspect all BMWs' will go 300,00 miles with enough money thrown after them.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

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    just hangin' out 2bikemike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 175781 View Post
    Or all motorcycle's, for that matter. The key is to get there without testing Theseus' paradox.
    Had to look that one up. Interesting observation.
    keep it light enough to travel.....
    '04 R1150RT
    '81 Honda CB650 Custom

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    I think you understand the cost of ownership and the value of BMW quality so I don't really follow what you are really asking.

    Sure, you could blow a clutch in the next 10,000 miles, or not for another 90,000 miles. Same with a final drive. Same with a headlight.
    Ride your present bike until repair costs get prohibitive and then go buy a new RT and don't obsess.

    Or, just go buy that Harley you're drooling over. There'll be plenty of takers for your 40,000 mile 1150RT

  10. #10
    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
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    I have yet to encounter a drool-worthy HD, though there are some nice ones. I'm addicted to the wind protection and quiet of my RTP, and conversely to the windy noise of riding my airhead.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

  11. #11
    JohnWC
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    Quote Originally Posted by 175781 View Post
    A bike with a master mechanic attached....
    Good point. I too, believe that would contribute significantly to longer motorcycle life.

  12. #12
    Nickname: Droid
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    My 94 RS only has 170,000 miles on it, being rock-reliable, those miles were made with me as the primary wrench. (a self taught "mechanic"). My steady ride has been in the dealership only twice in the past 18 years.

    That said I have done many maintenance updates, some corrections (like the ignition switch wiring), but I am also still riding on a majority of the original parts.

    Based on what I have seen from other high miles Oilheads, 100,000 is a VERY easy mileage point to achieve. A bike with 40,000 miles is barely warmed up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    My 94 RS only has 170,000 miles on it, being rock-reliable, those miles were made with me as the primary wrench. (a self taught "mechanic"). My steady ride has been in the dealership only twice in the past 18 years.

    That said I have done many maintenance updates, some corrections (like the ignition switch wiring), but I am also still riding on a majority of the original parts.

    Based on what I have seen from other high miles Oilheads, 100,000 is a VERY easy mileage point to achieve. A bike with 40,000 miles is barely warmed up.
    +1.

    mine is still a youngun at 95,000 miles, but still has most of its original parts (not counting maintenance items like alternator belts, filters, shocks, brake lines, brake pads, throttle cables, pivot bearings, etc). The only non-maintenance repair i've had on it was the trans input shaft shat the bed at 72K. and that is the only work on the bike that I have not done myself.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  14. #14
    Registered User redsledrider's Avatar
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    Had to Google it to

    My 95 RS has 130k

    Theseus’ Ship
    Theseus is remembered in Greek mythology as the slayer of the Minotaur. For years, the Athenians had been sending sacrifices to be given to the Minotaur, a half-man, half-bull beast who inhabited the labyrinth of Knossos. One year, Theseus braved the labyrinth, and killed the Minotaur.

    The ship in which he returned was long preserved. As parts of the ship needed repair, it was rebuilt plank by plank. Suppose that, eventually, every plank was replaced; would it still have been the same ship? A strong case can be made for saying that it would have been: When the first plank was replaced, the ship would still have been Theseus’ ship. When the second was replaced, the ship would still have been Theseus’ ship. Changing a single plank can never turn one ship into another. Even when every plank had been replaced, then, and no part of the original ship remained, it would still have been Theseus’ ship.

    Suppose, though, that each of the planks removed from Theseus’ ship was restored, and that these planks were then recombined to once again form a ship. Would this have been Theseus’ ship? Again, a strong case can be made for saying that it would have been: this ship would have had precisely the same parts as Theseus’ ship, arranged in precisely the same way.

    If this happened, then, then it would seem that Theseus had returned from Knossos in two ships. First, there would have been Theseus’ ship that has had each of its parts replaced one by one. Second, there would have been Theseus’ ship that had been dismantled, restored, and then reassembled. Each of them would have been Theseus’ ship.
    84 Honda 700S Nighthawk
    95 R1100RS

  15. #15
    just hangin' out 2bikemike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSledRider View Post
    Had to Google it to

    My 95 RS has 130k

    TheseusÔÇÖ Ship
    Theseus is remembered in Greek mythology as the slayer of the Minotaur. For years, the Athenians had been sending sacrifices to be given to the Minotaur, a half-man, half-bull beast who inhabited the labyrinth of Knossos. One year, Theseus braved the labyrinth, and killed the Minotaur.

    The ship in which he returned was long preserved. As parts of the ship needed repair, it was rebuilt plank by plank. Suppose that, eventually, every plank was replaced; would it still have been the same ship? A strong case can be made for saying that it would have been: When the first plank was replaced, the ship would still have been TheseusÔÇÖ ship. When the second was replaced, the ship would still have been TheseusÔÇÖ ship. Changing a single plank can never turn one ship into another. Even when every plank had been replaced, then, and no part of the original ship remained, it would still have been TheseusÔÇÖ ship.

    Suppose, though, that each of the planks removed from TheseusÔÇÖ ship was restored, and that these planks were then recombined to once again form a ship. Would this have been TheseusÔÇÖ ship? Again, a strong case can be made for saying that it would have been: this ship would have had precisely the same parts as TheseusÔÇÖ ship, arranged in precisely the same way.

    If this happened, then, then it would seem that Theseus had returned from Knossos in two ships. First, there would have been TheseusÔÇÖ ship that has had each of its parts replaced one by one. Second, there would have been TheseusÔÇÖ ship that had been dismantled, restored, and then reassembled. Each of them would have been TheseusÔÇÖ ship.
    In the context of a motorcycle if every part has been replaced and the old ones kept in a hermetically sealed mayonnaise jar (thanks Carnac) it would be a separate bike.
    keep it light enough to travel.....
    '04 R1150RT
    '81 Honda CB650 Custom

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