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Thread: Trailering hardware

  1. #1
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Trailering hardware

    I've just purchased a 16'x8' enclosed cargo trailer. One of the uses I've envisioned for this trailer is hauling one of my bikes around - most likely the GSA.

    I'm not the first person to use an enclosed cargo trailer to haul a bike around, so I'm wondering what others have used to secure the bike inside the trailer.

    I think I'll need some sort of front wheel chock. A removable device is preferred, as I'd like to not have a wheel chock permanently embedded in the floor of my cargo trailer. It appears that you can spend whatever amount of money you'd like on a front wheel chock - I've seen prices between $60 and $300.

    I know I'll need tie-downs - but has anyone come across recessed tie-down eyes? Again, I'd like to not have hardware protruding from the floor of the trailer if I'm not using to transport the bike. I presume I'll need to reinforce the floor under the wheel chock and tie down eyes - perhaps with a 2nd sheet of plywood or a metal plate under the trailer.

    How have you customized your cargo trailer to haul your bike(s)?
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  2. #2
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OfficerImpersonator View Post
    has anyone come across recessed tie-down eyes? ?
    http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&key...l_6eu5m1c6vq_b

    If you buy a Baxley Chock they have a optional plate for attaching the chock to the floor. When you remove the chock you only have a small plate on the floor.
    http://www.baxleycompanies.com/Boltdown.html
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  3. #3
    Rather Be Ridin' alabeemer's Avatar
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    I have several trailers rigged for hauling bikes and use them all as multi-use pieces of equipment. The least expensive chock I know of is the Pingle. As you suggest the mounts for this are attached to the floor of the trailer and the chock then is easily removable. With the chock removed the mounts are raised about .5" above the floor so they are not in the way really ...unless you need to slide other cargo in and out and need a completely flat floor surface.

    As you said there are several other chocks available including the roll-in chocks that will then hold the bike vertical while you get off to attach the tie downs. That is personal choice. I have one trailer with the roll-in chock and others with the Pingle setup.

    Flush mount tie down rings are handy. These are cut into the floor and like the Pingle mounts will be essentially flush with the floor when not in use. These are available at any trailer supply store or even Lowes or Home Depot.

    I also prefer E-track mounted to the floor running lengthwise in the trailer on either side of the bike. These are metal tracks with adjustable tie down rings that attach at about 1" increments along the rail. This allows you to move the tie down point to the best spot on the bike. Really handy when you have more than one bike that must be tied down at different points for the rear tie downs.

    As you mentioned, these devices must be securely attached to the trailer! Always make sure they are secured to the frame of the trailer beneath the floor. If it is not feasible to attach directly to the frame, add plates or angles under the trailer floor to strengthen the attachment. Then make sure the floor of the trailer is securely attached to the frame. The straps will apply a lot of pressure to those attachment points.

    The last thing you want is that "surprise" when you open the trailer door and find your bike laying on its side!! (Believe me...it is a bad surprise!)

    Good luck getting your trailer outfitted!
    Vance Harrelson
    MOA Ambassador/ Director
    R1200GSA - G450X - G650GS Sertao
    "Always Remember, Whatever You Believe, You Might Be Wrong" - Paul Thorn

  4. #4
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    We have the Baxely chocks, which are a very good design. They are adjustable for width, and they actually squeeze the sides of the tire when the wheel is rolled all the way in. The front "vee" is adjustable for best fit, back and forth, as well as vertically. One can control how far the cradle "tips over," so as to keep the bottom of the cradle from resting on the floor, which would lessen it's ability to securely hold the wheel. These features are a huge improvement over the cheaper models found everywhere: sometimes one does get what one pays for. We elected to get the quick-remove hardware, since we don't want to leave the chocks mounted all the time, just as you.
    Just as the above poster, we have E-track. Ours is lining both sides, as close to the walls as is possible, and one length of track goes straight up the middle. We have a bunch of quick-insert E-track D-rings that will provide instant mounting pads for the tie-downs anywhere along the length of the track. The E-track is very low profile and lays at floor level.
    We also have some Pingle solid chocks that already have the E-track hardware mounted to them. These can be quickly installed anywhere in the trailer, into the E-track, so as to easily fit just about any motorcycle. While these chocks aren't the Baxely style, they are about the best ones we have seen of the non-cradle variety.
    We also mounted one strip of E-track horizontally along each side wall of the trailer. With the quick-release D-rings, large items, such as freezers, can be shoved against either wall, D-rings clipped-in on either side, and one strap will hold the item securely during transport.
    For tie-downs, we use the two-inch "Big Daddy" models, from Powertye, along with some of their endless-loops. Powertye stuff will hold anything, and won't slip.

  5. #5
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice!

    I found a "TMS Heavy-Duty Adjustable Trailer Wheel Chock" on Amazon.com for $49.99. The product was well-reviewed, and at $150 less than the Baxter product, I couldn't pass it up.

    I also found a "Lund" 30"x69" aluminum motorcycle ramp on Amazon.com for $133 - with free shipping! I can't pass up free shipping on a 31 lb. ramp!

    Next will be the tie-down eyes in the trailer floor. Thanks to the suggestions above, I'll have no problem with configuring the trailer to haul motorcycles.

    Now - if anyone has any suggestions on where I can find low-cost folding bunk beds to mount on the trailer wall... Guess I'd better go find "Trailer Life's" online reader forum!
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  6. #6
    Dave Nicholls 105258's Avatar
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    Trailer Hardware

    I have a custom built enclosed aluminum trailer I use to take two bikes to Yuma each winter from Manitoba Canada. I installed a center and two side tracks, like they use in semi's for ties downs and use short strap type tye downs. This way they are moveable so you can get them just right. I have wheel chock for each bike bolted to the frame. This seems to work very ell and have had no problems.

    The BMW test ride group told me years ago not to compress the suspension if possible and if you have to compress it no more than 1 inch. They sid this is most important when traveling in temps less than freezing.

    I use ratchet straps with towels or fake sheepskin covers on the straps when wraping around tie down points.
    Dave Nicholls
    Teulon Manitoba - Canada

    2010 1200RT

  7. #7
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 105258 View Post
    The BMW test ride group told me years ago not to compress the suspension if possible and if you have to compress it no more than 1 inch. They sid this is most important when traveling in temps less than freezing.
    OTOH, here's a direct quote from the Canadian User Manual for the R1200RT

    Tighten all straps uniformly; the motorcycle's suspension should be compressed as tightly as possible front and rear.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  8. #8
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Found some recessed d-ring tie-downs - also on Amazon. I hope 6,000 lbs. pulling strength is strong enough!

    http://www.amazon.com/Recessed-D-Rin...d-ring+tiedown
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  9. #9
    Motorradfahrer
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    If you go to a tractor trailer supply company they will have e-track in 10-12 foot lengths for around $20 a piece. You mount those and you can tie down just about anywhere in the trailer or anything in the trailer. They will also sell the removable tie down loops.

  10. #10
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    I have an enclosed trailer and have hauled up to 4 bikes in it at a time. Have had good luck with this system from US Cargo Control. It offers a great deal of flexibility in where you place the tie down anchor, and can be used for tieing down just about anything. Also, I recommend you use a wheel chock that locks the wheel in when you load the bike; several types are available.
    Kevin Huddy
    Intrepid Incompetent
    Tm Pterodactyl MT Outpost

  11. #11
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBeemer View Post
    I have an enclosed trailer and have hauled up to 4 bikes in it at a time. Have had good luck with this system from US Cargo Control. It offers a great deal of flexibility in where you place the tie down anchor, and can be used for tieing down just about anything. Also, I recommend you use a wheel chock that locks the wheel in when you load the bike; several types are available.
    Tie-downs, a front-wheel chock, & a aluminum ramp are all on their way thanks to Amazon.com!

    My trailer has 2' deep shelving on the left wall, and I'm going to mount folding bunk beds on the right wall, so the only place to install a track-mount system would be down the right 1/3 of the trailer floor. I think a front wheel chock combined with beefy recessed tie-down anchors will do the trick.

    The only thing I wish I'd done differently at this point was order a recessed front wheel chock, but that requires cutting a pretty big hole in the floor of my trailer. http://www.amazon.com/24-Flip-Motorc...277673-5435355
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

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