Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 42

Thread: anybody use one of those outside storage sheds ...

  1. #1
    Registered User f14rio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    mattituck new york
    Posts
    1,081

    anybody use one of those outside storage sheds ...

    ... from lowes or home depot to store their bike(s)?
    if so, how'd it work out?
    thx,
    ed
    "Enemy fighters at 2 o'clock!...Roger, What should i do until then?"

    2010 r1200r, 2009 harley crossbones, 2008 triumph/sidecar, 1970 norton commando 750

  2. #2
    Registered User LMIWA156120's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    79
    We have a metal 9' x 10' shed and we store two motorcycles in it - no garage. We always park them inside, not just over the winter. We have an outdoor extension cord running out to it, so we have both light and power for trickle chargers.

    Because the door is not full width, riding one motorcycle in is easy. Riding the second one in requires much more attention as clearances are less than an inch.

    The lip at the door is a challenge if you don't have a ramp.

    And ALWAYS remember to duck!
    Loch Miwa
    Crestwood, IL
    2004 R1150RT

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    670
    I don't see any problem as long as you have a ramp of some kind. I also imagine you could sink the galvanized frame a few inches in the ground to minimize the floor height over the surrounding terrain.

    I have a 12' x 16' "shed" I got from Home Depot probably 15 years ago. It is a defacto garage. I put in underground electric from my home's basement for lighting and electrical outlets (GFI of course). It is flat on a concrete slab, no bump at the entrance and I only stained and sealed the exterior only twice and the wood still looks like new. I'm very happy with it. Just be aware that over the years your wood floor will warp , weaken or rot. I'd advise you to get a model that you can put over a concrete slab. (No wood floor)

  4. #4
    Mars needs women! 35634's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    2,031
    I have a 12x16 I have kept bikes in over the winter so I can make room for the cars in the garage. This year I plan to widen the door by a foot so I can get the sidecar in. That thing is a space hog!
    1987 K75S
    Original litter
    Original owner
    2012 Ural Gear Up

  5. #5
    Registered User f14rio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    mattituck new york
    Posts
    1,081

    re: "That thing is a space hog! "

    yep,
    "Enemy fighters at 2 o'clock!...Roger, What should i do until then?"

    2010 r1200r, 2009 harley crossbones, 2008 triumph/sidecar, 1970 norton commando 750

  6. #6
    What, me worry? GILLY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Evansville, WI
    Posts
    1,918
    Yes, I have pretty close to what you have illustrated, a Tuffshed, which Home Depot markets. Tuffshed does the installation.
    We have a 12X12, 150 sq ft is as large as I can go without needing a variance.
    We had a concrete slab poured, so we didn't need the fancy floor system Tuffshed brags about.
    During the summer my mower is stored in the shed and is taken out regularly using the same home made ramps.
    In the winter the shed absorbes a lot of things that used to be a hassle to store, the mower, my bike, patio furniture, the grille, stuff like that, really glad we got it. I sided it to match the house, so I didn't need to paint it.
    One thing I wish we had done was get the double door. People have already commented on putting a bike in with a sidecar for example. It is a cheap option.
    The single door I have is metal framed, very sturdy door.

    Gilly
    87 K75S, bought new, now sold
    07 K1200GT Bought new, now traded in
    13 C650GT
    MOA 44606

  7. #7
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Marion VA-In the middle of some of the best riding in the country.
    Posts
    3,279
    The ones from wood products work very well. The metal ones attract moisture. I've had both. You can go inside a metal one in certain conditions and the metal on things inside will be covered with moisture (like dew). It causes rust.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    N.H.
    Posts
    101
    When I bought my shed I priced out the Home Depot sheds and then looked at custom built ones. I found, IMHO, that the quality was better for around the same price. Also it can be built to your specs with any options you want, siding to match your house, windows added or removed, ect.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,236
    Somebodies got to say it: build one yourself! I'm a build it yourself guy so easy for me to say this. You can make it much cheaper than those sell for & to your own size(unless codes are an issue). I'd want a concrete floor & the rest is easy too. Once the floor's cured, it's a one weekend deal. If you don't know how find a friend/s that has the skills. I didn't spend that much for my 24x36 storage bldg & I bought ready mix,trusses,shingles & 4x6 treated poles-rest from own sawmill .

  10. #10
    Registered User Jim Rogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    348
    Just had an 8x16 built by a local contractor after researching/debating for about 6 weeks. The quality is superb, far exceeding that of a box store shed and that of a dedicated shed/barn builder. In addition to having the floor constructed to support the weight, I chose to get a 3 ft wide (each) double door along the side/end where I store the bikes. That 6 foot opening is a necessity, especially if you intend to put two in the unit.
    Gear Up and Ride Safe
    Jim Rogers
    2010 R12GSA aka Heidi
    Yorktown, Va

  11. #11
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    758
    FINALLY, the thread I always meant to start but didn't. A lockable, windowless bike shed is great for country dwellers who lack garage space. Mine is 8 X12, constructed of wood by a local, very sturdy, and hauled into our yard during the first snow many years ago. Since the ground slants on the only place for the shed, concrete blocks of different sizes as well as some wood shims were needed to get it level. I built a 4 foot wide ramp at a maybe 30 degree angle.

    Whatever kind of shed you buy or build, give some serious thought to how you will get your bike in and out safely. With mine, which is at right angles to the driveway, I ride just to the right of the ramp, let gravity pull me back as I turn the bar for a straight run to the parking spot. I have a board nailed to the floor to keep my windshield from hitting the shelving I installed. Also have a piece of thin plywood over the floor where the sidestand and centerstand make contact to avoid gouging up the plywood floor. Also think about how you will back the bike out: level or downhill are both OK, even slight uphill is not.

    Think about size. This 8 X12 shed was adequate for my road bike with bags and a Honda 150 scooter, so might also work for a road bike and a dirt bike. But if there is only an inch of clearance as another poster mentioned, I think you are asking for trouble.

    BTW, I know how a bat gets in from the eves. Cover the bike with a sheet from the thrift store to keep bat **** off the bike. Have NO IDEA how mice get in, but they do. Traps have netted me maybe a dozen, and there is no food for them in the shed.

    Think I spent $1500 for the shed. The all year protection for my bike from both weather and theft (yes, I experienced the latter) makes it one of my best investments I've made.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  12. #12
    Dale Rudolph
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Medford, Oregon
    Posts
    579
    Build it yourself. Every piece of that Tuff Shed building can be bought at Home depot.
    If you run into any problems, run down to H.D. and have a look at the one that is
    there.

    I bet if you went to the contractors desk and told them what you wanted to do, they
    will even put together a materials list and give you a quote.

    As is the case of most purchases, half the cost is in labor.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    248
    I stored my '78 airhead in one from 1996-2012. It was revived this year without too much grief. I did my best to prepare for storage by draining the fuel, changing the (engine) oil, and removing the battery. The bike was left uncovered on its side stand. Maybe I just got lucky that nothing major seemed harmed from the long sleep - other than a broken tail light bracket and a rusted master cylinder.

    Water collected due to condensation in the master cylinder, engine, transmission, differential, and drive shaft housings. A climate controlled garage would have stopped the condensation - but the shed was better than a barn since I could see any signs of bugs or vermin when putting up the lawn mower and such. I think my shed is 10x12.
    Stan

    AH# 13238

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    670
    I forgot to mention that my Home Depot shed/garage has a full size metal roll-up garage door which can be locked with padlocks on each side, but I hardly do, since I have the 110lb German Sheperd alarm system. I don't even know if this type of shed is still available. Everything I see at Home Depot has a barn door. The brand name is Handy Hut. I think you need to go to the special order desk and view the catalogs there before you order one, they're not on display.

    I also have a neighbor who had one of those Amish made sheds delivered and setup/leveled and the quality is very good and solidly built.

  15. #15
    na1g
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Greater Bahstin, Massachusetts
    Posts
    809
    I've got a Home Depot cheap-o shed that stores my lawn mower, snow blower and a half a ton of tools and junk - no motorcycles (they live in the garage) My only suggestion would be to throw down a sheet of 3/4" plywood to reinforce the floor. The floor is ply and the rest is particle board ("fall-a-particle board") but the thing has held up very well to New England winters. I added 4" round vents at the gables and near the floor to control condensation. They did the installation, setting the shed on cement blocks; worth the extra money to get it done quickly.

    pete

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •