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Thread: Front Crankshaft Seal

  1. #1
    Registered User
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    Nov 2006
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    Front Crankshaft Seal

    Bike is a 2002 R1150RT. I had to pull the alternator support housing to get the alternator out for servicing. After putting it back together I had an oil leak from the front crank seal. Guess I messed it up in putting the housing back on the engine.

    Took it apart again and pulled the HES plate and installed a new seal with the housing still attached to the engine. After a 70 mile ride today, I noticed a little oil seepage down the front. The manual calls for a special sleeve when installing the seal: I guess to protect the seal from the crank when installing. I used a piece of plastic tubing as a drift when installing the seal. Worked perfect.

    Any suggetions on what I should do to install the next one? Do I need some type of protection over the crank?

  2. #2
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Oct 2003
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    "Big Bend" TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChasinDaylight View Post
    Bike is a 2002 R1150RT. I had to pull the alternator support housing to get the alternator out for servicing. After putting it back together I had an oil leak from the front crank seal. Guess I messed it up in putting the housing back on the engine.

    Took it apart again and pulled the HES plate and installed a new seal with the housing still attached to the engine. After a 70 mile ride today, I noticed a little oil seepage down the front. The manual calls for a special sleeve when installing the seal: I guess to protect the seal from the crank when installing. I used a piece of plastic tubing as a drift when installing the seal. Worked perfect.

    Any suggetions on what I should do to install the next one? Do I need some type of protection over the crank?
    I don't know if you can find one, but the black plastic "can" that Kodak 35mm film used to come in is a perfect sleeve for this purpose. Cut out the bottom and carefully deburr the cut. Then slide the seal onto the can with bottom side toward the engine. Slip the can over the crankshaft and then drive the seal into position.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  3. #3
    Registered User twinsig's Avatar
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    Apr 2012
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    Heart Of Dixie!
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    Wow, cool info. I have ONE 15 yr old roll. Guess i should stash it in the beemer goody bag.
    Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch
    Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote

  4. #4
    wvrocks
    Guest
    I just did this job about a month ago. I used a piece of mylar film wrapped around the shaft to cover the keyway. I oiled the lip of the seal well so it slid on easily. Also used a PVC pipe fitting as a drift. I let the seal sit for 24 hours before I started the bike so it could form tight to the shaft. No leaks.

    We use mylar film around the office for some of our large engineering prints so it was cheap and handy. Camera film or negatives would work pretty well too.
    Last edited by wvrocks; 09-27-2012 at 07:22 PM.

  5. #5
    Registered User
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    Nov 2006
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    3
    Thank you very much. I'll try to find the film can and if not, use a strip of film.

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