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Thread: Need help with on road tire repair

  1. #1
    Registered User kurtnocal's Avatar
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    Need help with on road tire repair

    We are new to road bikes. We just bought new 2013 F700GS. Can anyone suggest a good system for tire repair for when we are off the beaten path? Thanks,
    2013 F700 GS
    Ostra Metallic Gray
    A boy lies in the grass unmoving staring at the sky...

  2. #2
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Tubeless tires I understand.

    I have had the best luck with the black or brown "gummy worm" type plugs that come in a plugging kit at almost any auto parts store. I like the kind labeled for belted radial tires because they are resistant to cutting if a tire has a steel belt. Get the kit with T handles if you can, and if you have room to carry them because they are easier to use than the kits with tools with screwdriver type handles.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  3. #3
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    a few opinions...I mean ideas here as well

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...ht=tire+repair
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  4. #4
    Registered User kurtnocal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    a few opinions...I mean ideas here as well

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...ht=tire+repair
    No kidding. Lots of ideas. Thanks much!
    2013 F700 GS
    Ostra Metallic Gray
    A boy lies in the grass unmoving staring at the sky...

  5. #5
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I have had the best luck with the black or brown "gummy worm" type plugs that come in a plugging kit at almost any auto parts store. I like the kind labeled for belted radial tires because they are resistant to cutting if a tire has a steel belt. Get the kit with T handles if you can, and if you have room to carry them because they are easier to use than the kits with tools with screwdriver type handles.
    That's what I carry, plus a small air pump I can plug into the bike.
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  6. #6
    Nuckin' Futs! tonyfr's Avatar
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    I use a Stop-n-Go tire plugger and a Slime pump. Has worked well for me twice.
    SABMWRA MOA #62
    2005 BMW R1200RT
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    1984 Kawasaki 750 Turbo E1

  7. #7
    2009 R1200RT beemeup's Avatar
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    Tire Repair

    I use the Cycle Pump and the Nealey Tire Repair Kit, it's simple, easy to use,
    no glue and it works every time.

    http://www.tirerepairkit.com/

  8. #8
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Tubeless tires I understand.

    I have had the best luck with the black or brown "gummy worm" type plugs that come in a plugging kit at almost any auto parts store. I like the kind labeled for belted radial tires because they are resistant to cutting if a tire has a steel belt. Get the kit with T handles if you can, and if you have room to carry them because they are easier to use than the kits with tools with screwdriver type handles.
    Everything Paul said - seconded - motion passed.

    The Tee-handles give you so much more torque when reaming the hole (necessary to prep for the string plug) and the proper application of the repair itself.

    My kit also includes a little bottle of White-Out (mark the hole once you find it - in the dark, you may not find it again once the intruding object has been removed, a needle-nose pliers to pull out the offender, and some rubber cement (Vulcanizing Glue even better, but hard to find) to lather up the worm-plug before insertion.

    Then a sharp knife (not razor blade - too small - will probably end up cutting yourself before you finally trim off excess plug material!) and all you're left to do is inflate.

    For that, I use a Cycle Pump 12v compressor, with in-line gauge -several other good brands on the market.

    Practice this all a couple of times the next time you switch tires (keep one of the old ones and drill "nail holes" into it) and you'll possess the confidence you will hopefully never have to use.

    And remember - a plug is to get you home, where you replace the tire as soon as possible. Your life and the life of any passenger is riding on your decision to spend what it takes to put uncompromised rubber back beneath you!
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

  9. #9
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post
    My kit also includes a little bottle of White-Out (mark the hole once you find it - in the dark, you may not find it again once the intruding object has been removed,...
    Maybe that should be a touring tip... or was it one that I missed? A small piece of chalk will work, too.

  10. #10
    got, got, got no time... rguy's Avatar
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    ... or just get a tire crayon for a couple bucks at any auto parts store. One will last you forever - break it into smaller pieces and share with friends
    Neal - '09 R1200GS / '81 R65
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  11. #11
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    I carry and do as Kevin notes and PG stated - it works. T handles, same pump. chalk, pliers, etc. I use compact needle nose bought at HF and always have both an angle and straight pair in the tool set. Practice doing plugs matters and it is worthwhile to take the time to get good at it. Of course, if you have tubes you'd better get good at patches and tire irons...

    Only possible exceptions are that I won't even consider plugging a really big hole or using multiple plugs in a hole and only rarely would I replace a plugged tire with a new one. Reasons are several but boil down to the the fact I've never had a plug fail even when doing dubious stuff like plugging a race tire, (a desperation move for sure) and that a failed plug on a small puncture will only produce a slow flat anyway- for which my experience says I'll have no trouble executing a safe stop- have had plenty of slow flats over the years with no issues. But I rarely ride 2 up and don't need to convince anyone to do as I do. Your own safety and judgement first so if you're going to worry about a plug failure, get a new tire- they're cheap enough...

  12. #12
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post

    My kit also includes a little bottle of White-Out (mark the hole once you find it - in the dark.........
    As long as we're throwing out some tips, on the bottle of white-out........pull the filler cap out and drop a couple of BB's in so you can agitate (mix up) the white-out back to a usable product after it sits. OM
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
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  13. #13
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    Correction. . .

    Uh, Paul, those aren't called "gummy worms" -- proper name is Gorilla Snot. When you gain more experience, you'll pick up more of the correct terminology, and will be able to communicate better. . . heck, you might even learn to do some wrenching, here and there!

    Great seeing you guys at Sipapu, and glad to hear that you're on the mend.

    Walking Eagle

  14. #14
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walking Eagle View Post
    Uh, Paul, those aren't called "gummy worms" -- proper name is Gorilla Snot. When you gain more experience, you'll pick up more of the correct terminology, and will be able to communicate better. . . heck, you might even learn to do some wrenching, here and there!

    Great seeing you guys at Sipapu, and glad to hear that you're on the mend.

    Walking Eagle
    I'm going to quit using my left handed hammer and monkey wrench. I got a flyer from Harbor Freight and they have some wrenches and stuff called sockets or something fer real cheap. They even got a grinder you can plug in and hold in your hand instead of being bolted to the shelf in the shed. It was more exciting than my old Monkey Wards catalog. They even have colored duck tape. I can't but hardly wait till my order gets here so I can take something apart. Wheee!
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  15. #15
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    You could of course get more adventurous and "update" your navigation gear. HF sells a cute little brass sextant that might be just the thing for when the gps is dead. That with an accurate watch and ephemeris and you're good to go anywhere- no more map updates needed.......

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