Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 36

Thread: Fuel Tank Sealer Botched Job

  1. #16
    Registered User b25bsaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Calgary, AB. Canada
    Posts
    423
    Quote Originally Posted by b25bsaboy View Post
    Hi Stan,

    I liked to have that ability. POR-15, however, is not so easy to remove.
    That is a huge understatement, however did call the 800 # and spoke to a gentleman by the name of Matt and was advised of the following:
    POR-15 can be removed using the following chemicals:
    1. Methylene Chloride
    2. My Stripper
    3. Air Craft paint Stripper.
    All of the above are nasty stuff and to be handled with care.
    Wish there was a way to do this simply and not destroy the paint?
    Here is a picture of when I removed the fuel pet cock. No wonder the Bing Carbs were having a coughing fit?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Rick MacPherson
    Success is Not a Destination, But a Journey.
    Accredited Motorcycle Appraiser
    1968 BSA Starfire, 1976 BMW R75/6, 2009 R1200RT

  2. #17
    Registered User b25bsaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Calgary, AB. Canada
    Posts
    423
    Quote Originally Posted by b25bsaboy View Post
    Here is a picture of when I removed the fuel pet cock. No wonder the Bing Carbs were having a coughing fit?
    Here is what some of the chunks of non adhered POR-15 looks like.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Rick MacPherson
    Success is Not a Destination, But a Journey.
    Accredited Motorcycle Appraiser
    1968 BSA Starfire, 1976 BMW R75/6, 2009 R1200RT

  3. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    528

    I will second the red kote route

    I just did two /2 tanks with it and one was a victim of poor preparation and por-15 that either didn't stick or had not held up. Unfortunately the best way to get the residual stuff out is time, heat and then a lot of shaking and rinsing.

    You might get lucky if you put the tank under some heat lamps for a few hours to get the liner crispy and brittle and then do the shake and rinse routine.

    Getting back to the Red Kote stuff. You have to mask off the outside of the tank really really good before you get the stuff or the MEK near your paint otherwise it will come right off. The Red Kote will seal up any of the little tiny chunks of the old liner that doesn't flush out or is partially attached.

    The inside of the tank looks to be a mess and you may want to consider the radiator shop/boiling it out route and then repaint the tank. If there's no body work to be done a competent painter can give you a factory finish for a lot less than you would have in time and aggravation and possibly damaging the paint anyway.

  4. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,222
    The original toaster tank on my 51k, /5 project has no rust inside but the OEM inside coating is showing its age. The outside will be re-painted.Having used POR-15 in the past on worse vintage tanks(inside rust) I was leaning toward another POR-15 job but now thinking Red Kote is the way to go? Any other ideas out there?

    FWIW, one of the things you have to watch out for when you seek & try to apply information from various "tech Lines" such as mentioned here (but not meaning to point at POR-15's tech line) is that they are knowledgeable about their products but often lack "application" skills or knowledge. Don't expect them to know how to use the product in the shop as would a skill trained tradesman.

  5. #20
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    12,993
    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    Any other ideas out there?
    Caswell Plating has a sealing kit. I used it on my R25/2 tank for a touch up job.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    528
    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    The original toaster tank on my 51k, /5 project has no rust inside but the OEM inside coating is showing its age. The outside will be re-painted.Having used POR-15 in the past on worse vintage tanks(inside rust) I was leaning toward another POR-15 job but now thinking Red Kote is the way to go? Any other ideas out there?

    FWIW, one of the things you have to watch out for when you seek & try to apply information from various "tech Lines" such as mentioned here (but not meaning to point at POR-15's tech line) is that they are knowledgeable about their products but often lack "application" skills or knowledge. Don't expect them to know how to use the product in the shop as would a skill trained tradesman.
    Another benefit with Red Kote is it has an almost indefinite shelf life if you seal the can after using it. I used the same can a week ago that I bought 12 years ago and it worked perfectly. I have some left over and will buy some more so I can do all the project tanks sometime this Winter before I get paint put on them.

    Por-15 is some great stuff but its no match for the Red Kote!!!

  7. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    248
    My choice for Red Kote was so the original red coating could be duplicated or preserved. That did not work out. I don't think there were any pin-holes in the tank, but the original coating was starting to flake based on the petcock screens.

    I used ~ 1/2 gallon of superclean in the tank and let it sit for about a day. All the original coating was removed. Multiple flushing with water got the coating out. Since I was in that far: 1/2 gallon of etch-n-prep was added to the tank which was then agitated for ~ 1/2 hour. The etch-n-prep is phosphoric acid, the superclean is sodium hydroxide. The tank was flushed multiple times with water.

    Three coats of Red Kote were applied after letting the tank dry and rinsing with acetone and MEK. I rigged up a hair dryer set on low to help dry the tank. The original red coating was not duplicated after applying the Red Kote.

    In hind site, I would have been much more careful about taping and covering the paint. But, it was not too bad - primarily because I understood not to try and clean the coating if any got on the paint. There are now some red hue areas from the coating that I expect will eventually fade when exposed to sunlight.

    My tank has the original paint that was not in great shape before coating. So, it was not a catastrophe that some coating got on the paint. Overall, I would do it again but be much more careful with taping and covering the tank paint. My experience may not relate to yours. YMMV.
    Stan

    AH# 13238

  8. #23
    Dale Rudolph
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Medford, Oregon
    Posts
    579
    Along with the use of chemicals, something that will help break off coatings of paint or rust is to put some washers, screws or other small objects into the tank and give it a good shaking. I had an old Triumph gas tank that had rust in it, I used a box of 1 inch drywall screws. It won't get everything out, but it got most of the rust out of the tank before going to the chemicals.
    I counted the number of screws that went in each time and made sure the same number came out.

  9. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eastern KY
    Posts
    3,222
    There is an ongoing thread on ADV in "The Garage" section, r.e. fuel tank renovation that makes reference to www.rusteco.com . I just read the website as pertains to MC's & there is some good info., however the product is very expensive! Cost $125 for enough for a 5 gal. tank! Anybody used this stuff or have knowledge of what the magic solution might be in a more affordable source?
    The ADV thread has several other experienced comments on tank renovation.
    As to the above "shake & clean" method-I've done that one but it's worth saying(never know who might be reading this) that you best not have any gasoline in the tank when you do so!

  10. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    416
    I am currently doing the tank(s) on my Indian Chief. I am using epoxy from Aircraft Spruce. For anyone doing a tank interior project, it would behoove you to buy a "Digital Inspection Device" from Harbor Freight.

  11. #26
    Registered User b25bsaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Calgary, AB. Canada
    Posts
    423
    Quote Originally Posted by swall View Post
    I am currently doing the tank(s) on my Indian Chief. I am using epoxy from Aircraft Spruce. For anyone doing a tank interior project, it would behoove you to buy a "Digital Inspection Device" from Harbor Freight.
    Totally agree, in that I borrowed one from my buddy down the street and what I saw on the other side towards the rear of the tank made me very sad, then madder than H e double tooth picks to think someone made this lovely mess and now I come along to clean it up. Will be getting the tank back shortly and will give a full report with pictures.
    Rick MacPherson
    Success is Not a Destination, But a Journey.
    Accredited Motorcycle Appraiser
    1968 BSA Starfire, 1976 BMW R75/6, 2009 R1200RT

  12. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    248
    An inspection tool would be very useful. I did not find this Harbor Freight digital inspection tool useful and returned it: http://www.harborfreight.com/digital...era-67979.html. A good flashlight and working with angles provided more detail than the HF tool. But then, I did not spend hours tinkering with it to see if I could get better results or buy the more expensive model.
    Stan

    AH# 13238

  13. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    B.P., MN
    Posts
    729
    Remember, epoxys formulated for fuels back in the late eighties and early nineties had no idea the concoctions of booteeque fuels that the feds have come up with in our postmodern era. There was a time when gas was gas. Can't imagine the coatings of today will last much longer than those from twenty some years back.

  14. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    166
    One of the bennefits of ethanol fuel is moisture goes into solution in the alcohol and out thru the carburators with the gas instead of forming a little puddle of water in the bottom of the tank and rusting thru the seam like in the old days.. Its the reason northerners put dry gas in their tanks in the winter to absorb the water an avoid frozen fuel lines. Its hard for me to believe that the minute partilcles going thru a gas filter would prop open a needle valve. I'd take a really good look at my float conditions first. They are the classic over flowing carb source.

  15. #30
    Registered User b25bsaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Calgary, AB. Canada
    Posts
    423
    Quote Originally Posted by R80andR100RT View Post
    One of the bennefits of ethanol fuel is moisture goes into solution in the alcohol and out thru the carburators with the gas instead of forming a little puddle of water in the bottom of the tank and rusting thru the seam like in the old days.. Its the reason northerners put dry gas in their tanks in the winter to absorb the water an avoid frozen fuel lines. Its hard for me to believe that the minute partilcles going thru a gas filter would prop open a needle valve. I'd take a really good look at my float conditions first. They are the classic over flowing carb source.
    Sorry for the delay as it has been overly busy in my world. Here is what finally happened on the messed up POR 15 tank liner.
    I phoned POR 15 on there 800 # and spoke with a technical person who amazingly enough understood and had sympathy for me. Advised that you can remove the POR 15 chemically using anything that is a Methylene Chloride base. Products such as Mystripper, Liquid Aircraft Paint Stripper all works extremely well. The tank has to be throughly cleaned with clean hot water. It then has to be etched to allow any other tank liner to used. He said several times that the biggest reason POR 15 sometimes fail, is that people do not dry the internals of the tank to remove any traces of water.
    Now the fun began.
    I hunted all over Western Canada for the Red Kote product and no one would sell me enough to do my tank. However found a radiator shop here in Calgary called City Radiator who said and did take the tank, stripped the POR 15 out and relined the tank with Red Kote twice. Was not cheap, but it saved me time and the cost of getting rid of the left over chemicals. Nice part is that they did screw up the outer paint, even though it will have to be repainted someday.
    End of story, in that POR 15 is gone, Red Kote is now a beautiful red color and I know my Bing Carbs will now perform the way they are supposed to without get clogged with that fine white powder we are all familiar with at the bottom of the tank.
    I am glad the water has finally gone under the bridge on this situation.
    I will post some pictures towards the end of the week.
    Rick MacPherson
    Success is Not a Destination, But a Journey.
    Accredited Motorcycle Appraiser
    1968 BSA Starfire, 1976 BMW R75/6, 2009 R1200RT

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •