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Thread: Favorite Books

  1. #31
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemer-red
    I read a 1/2 hour to 45 minutes and it took almost the year but the kids loved it so I had to do it for all of them. I actually got much better at it in the end.
    Now that is really cool.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  2. #32
    rocketman
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Brase
    I started re-reading Zen And The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance yesterday. First read was 25 or so years ago. My margin notes look pretty sophomoric now. Pirsig's second book (don't recall the title) is simply unreadable.


    The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco, a mystery novel set in a monastary in 1327. It is really much better than you'd think. And better than the movie though Sean Connery is almost always worth watching.
    And for sheer fun, anything by Tom Robbins.

    John
    I tried to reread Zen a few years ago also after about 30 years from the first attempt, got thru the first few chapters, and while I liked it a whole better the second time, it still didn't really capture me so it got put away, again, maybe when I'm 90 I'll pull it out and try again.

    Name of the Rose, definately a winner, moive was pretty good to but as you S. C. had a lot to do with that.

    RM

  3. #33
    535IS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Statdawg View Post
    I just finished African Game Trails by Theodore Roosevelt.
    Man, talk about dredging up an old thread!

    Does just finishing a book qualify it as your favorite? Just askin'.

    My own favorites from recent years (although my 'old list' is a close match to Manic Mechanic, Randy's) are B.S. Levy's historical fiction series about 19-y-o Jersey garage mechanic Buddy Palumbo getting sucked into sports car road racing in 1952 (The Last Open Road) and continuing hilarity through the Mexican Road Race (Montezuma's Ferrari), building his own sports special (The Fabulous Trashwagon) and the one I'm still behind on (Toly's Ghost). I'd probably read them even if I didn't personally know that the guy is a total lunatic ...

  4. #34
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    Talk About an Old Thread!

    If you go to page two there is a picture of YB in IN`s bookshelf I guess at his dorm/ apt. Just goes to show what apart of our lives he was.
    Lost but making good time

  5. #35
    Registered User redclfco's Avatar
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    Kesey revisited

    I pick up a Ken Kesey once every decade or so. "One Flew over Cookoos Nest", "Sometimes a Great Notion"

    And last week I picked up "Demon Box" for a wild ride...before that it was his comeback novel "Sailors Song"

    Kesey attracts me as much as his books repulse me all at once.

    Anybody else read this guy?

    Did he pop his literary bubble on his first two novels, and the rest have been swan songs as I suspect?

    Then why do I continue to read them?

    Me thinks his ability to put a film...in words of sorts..into my head. I don't always like the disjointed sitcomb he's created in his books, but I sure enjoy watching the resulting film in my head!

  6. #36
    Kbrick
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    Quote Originally Posted by 535is View Post
    Man, talk about dredging up an old thread!

    Does just finishing a book qualify it as your favorite? Just askin'.

    My own favorites from recent years (although my 'old list' is a close match to Manic Mechanic, Randy's) are B.S. Levy's historical fiction series about 19-y-o Jersey garage mechanic Buddy Palumbo getting sucked into sports car road racing in 1952 (The Last Open Road) and continuing hilarity through the Mexican Road Race (Montezuma's Ferrari), building his own sports special (The Fabulous Trashwagon) and the one I'm still behind on (Toly's Ghost). I'd probably read them even if I didn't personally know that the guy is a total lunatic ...
    I also read the first three BS Levy books... I thought "Trashwagon" was the weakest title. I guess after the Mexican Road Race in Montezumas Ferrari Buddy needed a break.

    I also like the way BS Levy sells books, on his own!

    http://www.lastopenroad.com/index.htm

  7. #37
    Registered User Mrs2beers's Avatar
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    odd assortments

    As stated above :
    The Hobbit and the LOTR trilogy
    Neil Peart...
    ......
    Anne Rice
    Dean Koontz
    Robert Jordan
    Richard Patterson

    Many other authors that had story lines that were interesting to read.
    "Wether you're a good witch or a bad witch, it's all about the shoes"

    RIP "Zoot" Oct. 14th, 2007
    "Angus" 2009

  8. #38
    535IS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kbrick View Post
    I also like the way BS Levy sells books, on his own!
    Yeah. The gag around Road America (aka 'The Summer Store') is that the rarest of Burt's books will be the ones he didn't sign!

  9. #39
    Kbrick
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    about Burt

    Quote Originally Posted by 535is View Post
    Yeah. The gag around Road America (aka 'The Summer Store') is that the rarest of Burt's books will be the ones he didn't sign!
    Burt does nice work for Vintage Motorsport too!

    http://www.vintagemotorsport.com/default.asp

  10. #40
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    After an extended hiatus, I have rediscovered reading. Recently read "Blind Your Ponies" by Stanley Gordon West and almost the entire series of books by C.J. Box. (Stories about a Wyoming Gamewarden) Currently reading "Empire of the Summer Moon" by S.C. Gwynne (The story of the Comanche Nation) and "Threat Vector" by Tom Clancy. Reading is suddenly fun again.
    Kevin Huddy
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    Tm Pterodactyl MT Outpost

  11. #41
    Registered User Bob_M's Avatar
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    The Places In Between by Rory Stewart is a haunting true story. Rory is a Scottish anthropoligist who walked across Afganistan. The book, little more than a well crafted journel details his trek through this harsh country. Amazing insight into the country which is always in the news as a trouble spot and a tale of a searcher who's character lies between brave and crazy.

  12. #42
    na1g
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    Motorcycle theme: Riding With Rilke, by Ted Bishop

    I have an autographed copy of Zen and the Art... with I slogged through back then. I've tried again twice and just can't make myself work that hard to read a book.

    Now my reading is mostly on the lines of Robert Parker's Spenser series.

    pete

  13. #43
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    "The Art of Racing in the Rain" by Garth Stein

  14. #44
    Registered User Bob_M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by na1g View Post

    Now my reading is mostly on the lines of Robert Parker's Spenser series.

    pete
    The Spencers are fun. You will love the who-dunnits by Michael Connelly

  15. #45
    John
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    Unbroken
    Great read. True Story that is amazing that one person could endure. For those interested in WW11, and what happened to one man to survive the whole ordeal is truly amazing.
    Book By Lauren Hillenbrand
    Last edited by EvryDayRide; 08-11-2013 at 09:31 PM.

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