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Thread: 00 R1100RT Fairing "Toasted"

  1. #1
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    Unhappy 00 R1100RT Fairing "Toasted"

    I've just noticed on my new to me RT that the fair shields on the backside of the fairing by the exhaust manifolds are brown and toasted, plus I have a blister the size of a half dollar on the left exhaust fairing. I felt the plastic after a short 5 mile ride I take to work, some stop and go but not a lot of sitting in traffic and even on a cool morning that plastic gets hot! Is this really normal or am I missing something engine wise. I'm near my 24k maint and the previous owner did valves and sync at 13k. I did put fresh NGK plugs in at 21k and changed to oil to 20/50 amsoil full syn.

    I just don't want to damage the fairing any further and catch fire!

    <>

  2. #2
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    either you or previous owner let the bike sit and warm up. totally unnecessary action- just start the bike and go; less than 30 seconds idling is plenty of warm up time.
    unless you get stuck in stopped traffic on a hot day for an extended amount of time (in which case, shut the engine down while sitting and waiting for movement to resume), there should be no issue with overheating to the point of damaging fairing or engine.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  3. #3
    Registered User kgadley01's Avatar
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    Yea my 99RT did the same thing. I purchased a package of header wrap from the local parts store. It takes some time to do it right, but if you follow the instructions carefully, it will turn out very nice. I did mine all the way to just in front of the catolic converter. Heat problem solved!!!
    AKA SNAPGADGET
    Lifes too short to ride an ugly Motorcycle

  4. #4
    OldBMWMaster JDOCKERY132445's Avatar
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    Valves

    Adjust your valves. Also run non-ethanol fuel; it runs much cooler.
    Jerry Dockery
    309 N. 3rd. Ave.
    Kure Beach, NC 28449
    1996 R1100RT main bike & 1985 K100RS...too fast to believe.

  5. #5
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    Start and go

    Yes, I've learned in the past month start and go is the way to go and I do so every time. Put I never really let it sit more than a minute or two the first week or two I had the bike. I just want to make sure I don't have any other issues.

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    non-ethanol fuel

    Quote Originally Posted by JDOCKERY132445 View Post
    Adjust your valves. Also run non-ethanol fuel; it runs much cooler.
    I will do the valve adjustment, but the non-ethanol fuel use its almost impossible here to get it. I have put it in once but the long rides I like to do really can't find it much. I wish that was not the case...

  7. #7
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    And set the valves a bit on the loose side: instead of .006 and .012, use .007-.008 and .014. The extra coupla picoseconds of "closed" time lets the valve (especially the exhaust) transfer heat from the face to the head.

    Make sure the oil cooler is clean - no buggers clogging up the fins.

  8. #8
    Registered User GKman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDOCKERY132445 View Post
    Adjust your valves. Also run non-ethanol fuel; it runs much cooler.
    Ethanol requires 2.64 times as much heat to evaporate, cooling the charge (2378 BTU per Gal/900 BTU per Gal) and contains only 66% as much energy to turn into heat (76,330 BTU per Gal/116,000 BTU per Gal).
    Where does the heat come from?

  9. #9
    OldBMWMaster JDOCKERY132445's Avatar
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    The heat

    Quote Originally Posted by GKman View Post
    Ethanol requires 2.64 times as much heat to evaporate, cooling the charge (2378 BTU per Gal/900 BTU per Gal) and contains only 66% as much energy to turn into heat (76,330 BTU per Gal/116,000 BTU per Gal).
    Where does the heat come from?
    The heat comes from the engine running lean because it is not a "flex" engine.

    Non flex engines may burn lean with high ethanol blends such as E85 as the injectors run out of capacity at WOT conditions or such when engine controls pushed into temporary open loop feedback and assume gasoline is the fuel. Small engines, not adjusted may run lean, similarly, even with low ethanol blends. Lean burn conditions would increase combustion temperature within an ethanol burn.

    I had this occur while at Daytona this year. I filled up at a station that had not sold much premium [my stupidity for stopping a a small convenience store] and the fuel has separated giving me a high alcohol level.

    I have toasted "shark fins" on my R1100RT to drive the point home.
    Jerry Dockery
    309 N. 3rd. Ave.
    Kure Beach, NC 28449
    1996 R1100RT main bike & 1985 K100RS...too fast to believe.

  10. #10
    Registered User GKman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDOCKERY132445 View Post
    The heat comes from the engine running lean because it is not a "flex" engine.

    Non flex engines may burn lean with high ethanol blends such as E85 as the injectors run out of capacity at WOT conditions or such when engine controls pushed into temporary open loop feedback and assume gasoline is the fuel. Small engines, not adjusted may run lean, similarly, even with low ethanol blends. Lean burn conditions would increase combustion temperature within an ethanol burn.

    I had this occur while at Daytona this year. I filled up at a station that had not sold much premium [my stupidity for stopping a a small convenience store] and the fuel has separated giving me a high alcohol level.

    I have toasted "shark fins" on my R1100RT to drive the point home.
    Thanx for the detailed info. There is so much mis-information floating around, I like to check and see if the poster knows what he's talking about. Sounds like you do.

  11. #11
    Registered User Bmandiego's Avatar
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    It's normal. It is due to the engine running hot, not necessarily due to ethanol, and the single wall pipe combined with the close tolerance from the pipe to the plastic, and the airflow. One of mine has a blister. I have managed to buy some replacement shark fins. One off ebay, and one for the other side off Beemer Boneyard.
    I've thought about the exhaust wrap before.
    2000 R1100RT-P

  12. #12
    Registered User GKman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bmandiego View Post
    I have managed to buy some replacement shark fins.
    I've thought about the exhaust wrap before.
    My 2002 R1150RT has a shark mouth but I can't see shark fins. ??

  13. #13
    Registered User Bmandiego's Avatar
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    lol.
    The plastic fairing inserts that sit next to the exhaust on my 1100rt. They go by different names, I found mine by looking for r1100rt shark fins.
    Here is one I just googled on ebay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/01...R1100RT...-/230845278410
    2000 R1100RT-P

  14. #14
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    "Normal"???

    Hell no. It's a sign of overheating and/or insufficient air flow.

    If it was "normal", we'd see it on 'most every older RT. Not the case, guys.

  15. #15
    Registered User Bmandiego's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls1150 View Post
    "Normal"???

    Hell no. It's a sign of overheating and/or insufficient air flow.

    If it was "normal", we'd see it on 'most every older RT. Not the case, guys.
    Hi Paul!
    I agree it's an airflow issue.
    But...
    Hell yeah!
    It's normal and common, any 1100 rt will melt itself to the ground if it sits and idles with the fairing on.
    Most bikes can idle at a stop with no ill effects. The 1100rt's could do it too if you remove the fairings from around the exhaust.
    It's a common occurrence with the rt. The reason that it doesn't happen more often is because most owners know this, or they find out soon enough.
    2000 R1100RT-P

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