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Thread: Winching an F800gs

  1. #1
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    Winching an F800gs

    I normally tune into a couple of the ATV shows such as Fisher's ATV World and Dirt Trax when it's in season. Today on Fisher's show, Brian and his friends from Warn Winch were in the dunes in Oregon. I tried to find the video of the winch-out they did with the Warn XT17 but for some reason- it doesn't exist. I did find another which is a good example of the new self-rescue winch they have come up with. With a bike this heavy, if your out on your own, it looks like a good idea. OM

    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200
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    Douglas Williams
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    Sent from a Galaxy, far, far away

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    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Alone is me;

    I adventure alone about everywhere and the winch seems a great idea. All my years have kept me alive without one, however and a few times, Jeeps have assisted me, which had winches. I would never replace my rear luggage space with a winch either! It would have to pack in somewhere on the bike and it does seem small enough to put anywhere. When I adventure about, my GSA is well packed for camping and space is used up. A winch may be in my future? RandyGSA1200 could surely use some help at times! Randy

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    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Throw some rope in the bottom of one of your panniers along with some cord and a few carabiners. Learn how to make a Z-drag. Not as nice as a winch, but it will do in a pinch. Both suffer from the same problem... the need for an anchor not too far away.

  5. #5
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    A fiddle block set-up from a sailing rig is a way to pull also. With the winch, I think the big advantage is being able to steady the bike and just your thumb is working. OM
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200
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  6. #6
    look out!!! Visian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    Throw some rope in the bottom of one of your panniers along with some cord and a few carabiners. Learn how to make a Z-drag. Not as nice as a winch, but it will do in a pinch. Both suffer from the same problem... the need for an anchor not too far away.
    This is a much better, lighter, more compact and far lower cost solution.

    I tested that winch, and while it's nice, it is *heavy* and all the stuff they show being used in the video takes a ton of room in your bags. Plus, you must have something to tie-off to, and... you really need to be careful where you attach the winch to your bike. It must be a good, balanced attachment point with minimal risk of bending something.

    For instance, the video shows an F800 with conventional forks... probably a safe bet. But what about the forks on an oilhead, which are carried by the ball on the Telever, designed to support the weight of the bike, but not pulling the weight of a stuck bike.

    In my testing, I attached to the Hepco-Becker crashbars on my 1150 GS. It worked, but there was some flexing.

    What I wish they'd come up with is a system for picking up that heavy mutha when you drop it. Mark - have you ever tried the Z-drag approach for that?

    Ian

    ps => I saw this system demo'd in 2010 at the Redmond Rally.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Motorcycle-R...item3ccebabeca

  7. #7
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    I would consider using a Z-drag to lift my bike... except there is never an anchor in sight when I drop my bike much less an anchor point somewhere above the bike. The only time I've ever set up the Z-drag was in my yard to make sure I knew how it worked.

    Hmmm, If I add a couple of pulleys and a stuff sack to my existing kit I've got the PSSOR system. The system in use....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwhpI6sG12Q

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    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    Hmmm, If I add a couple of pulleys and a stuff sack to my existing kit I've got the PSSOR system. The system in use....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwhpI6sG12Q
    That's what I did. I went to the local outdoor outfitting store MEC, and got all the items to build my own kit for much less money. If you're willing to spend a bit more, you can buy other friction devices that don't require as much rope and knot tying skill to set up and use. I went with the basics and tied my own prussic cords, but I'm well versed in the field as it's part of my job skills as a firefighter. As mentioned before though, when there's no anchor point available, you're back to basics and manual lifting. I also carry a length of 1" tubular webbing to add some additional reach if needed. The great thing about the tubular webbing is it's light and compact while still being quite strong, you can carry a pretty significant length of it without a huge space and weight penalty. You do need to use different knots with it, so it's good to learn those before you need them.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  9. #9
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    I checked out the video of the bike haul up the stairway and it seems to work. I'm real familiar with ropes, rigging, rescue and knots.
    While I'll guess there would be some comments on the cost, this page http://www.baileysonline.com/itemdet...item=FB%208315 has all you would need for a self-rescue/mechanical advantage set up. The fiddle block arrangement is simple and effective and the endless loop slings take care of the rest of the rigging- if you decide to go with a manual set-up rather than 12V. OM
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200
    Part of the Forum Threadside Assistance Program

  10. #10
    look out!!! Visian's Avatar
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    Has anyone tried the Z-drag or Fiddle block systems where *you* are the tie-off point, for lifting the bike?

  11. #11
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    You would still be physically holding the entire weight by yourself if you were the anchor. It might be possible if you could sit low and brace yourself well enough, but I don't know how much easier it would be than just deadlifting the bike with proper technique. The advantage of the lift system is the reduced effort from the mechanical advantage of the pulleys and from the friction devices preventing it slipping back.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  12. #12
    look out!!! Visian's Avatar
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    Yes, you'd be dealing with all of the weight, but even when you deadlift with correct technique, you're still in a somewhat awkward position. I don't know what's possible... it could be that you use the setup, perhaps in conjunction with an effective harness, and step backwards away from the bike.

    All I know is if anyone ever invents a workable/packable system for picking up the bike, there will be a whole ton of very grateful whitebeard adventure riders!

  13. #13
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Harley riders get all the neat tools: http://www.eglidegoodies.com/id444.html

  14. #14
    Douglas Williams
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    Harley riders get all the neat tools: http://www.eglidegoodies.com/id444.html
    With my luck, the bike would fall onto the saddlebag containing the jack. Maybe I should get two, one for each side. Just in case, you know....
    Sent from a Galaxy, far, far away

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    MearthA rdalland's Avatar
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    I carry this with me:



    I can easily lift my Dakar off the ground with the block and tackle. The funny thing is that the only time I have needed it was in my yard when i fell and got wedged between two trees...
    ride what you've got; enjoy the road you're on!

    Reid - Stone Ridge, NY - MOA #69187 - Turbo Fluffy Motoclub - IBA #50182

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