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Thread: Riding Fatigue

  1. #16
    Morning Person
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newstar View Post
    Next time that happens, I'd suggest some 5 Hour Energy. I'm not a fan of these energy drinks but recently on several long days of travelling, I finally tried one on the advice of my husband. They taste awful (waaaay too sweet) but they do give you an extra dose of energy with no nasty side effects like jitters or "crashing". Surprisingly, it also did not keep me from sleeping when bed time came.
    On the way home during the ride I mentioned, I felt the onset of fatigue (most likely hypoglycemia and dehydration). I did stop and buy a bottle of water and a Snickers bar (normally I don't eat stuff like that, but I know it can provide a quick energy recovery due to the high sugar/fat content - Everest climbers have been known to eat sticks of butter with sugar on them for recovery). This gave me a quick boost and saw me home in good shape. But the problem with solutions like that is the ultimate energy crash when it wears off. I took a lunch, but it wasn't large enough, obviously. Learning process...

  2. #17
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    I ride for a while...take a short nap, ride some more....nap.....(leave your helmet on and it will act like a pillow, but you might wake yourself up snoring)

  3. #18
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    As a new found member of the sleep apnea club, when I hear that someone is tired during the day, performing below par(pun intended), snoring & some of the other stuff mentioned above-you need to get a sleep test. I'm also in the camp that "if they test you" , you will have it. I'm beginning to wonder who doesn't have it!
    IMO, to compare golf & riding is the basically the same as they are both somewhat self destructive activities.
    On a serious note I was one of those that wakes up feeling great & never a fatigue problem- but I really have it!

  4. #19
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brewmeister View Post
    I like to follow our main rule which formed the club in the first place:
    Lots Of Stops Touring Association !
    That's the only way I can do a big day on a bike, start early and do lots of short stops to get off the bike, rehydrate, etc.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  5. #20
    Nickname: Droid
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    One thing for certain, fatigue on a bike is very real and should not be taken lightly. I have twice proven it is possible to fall completely asleep at the handlebar. Brief though it was, I was "alseep at the bar", having nothing to do with liquor. Luckily, in both cases I awoke before disaster struck.

    If you are fatigued and tired, don't push it. Don't ride.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    One thing for certain, fatigue on a bike is very real and should not be taken lightly. I have twice proven it is possible to fall completely asleep at the handlebar. Brief though it was, I was "alseep at the bar", having nothing to do with liquor. Luckily, in both cases I awoke before disaster struck.

    If you are fatigued and tired, don't push it. Don't ride.
    Good advice...same advice I employed when flying. And when I ignored it, I totally understood the pilots' saying: "I'd rather be on the ground wishing I was in the air, than in the air wishing I was on the ground"!

  7. #22
    Donster
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    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    Riding motorcycles versus golf (A good walk wasted, Mark Twain). I see the cycle ride as a much more beneficial activity.

    But then, I really suck at golf. And I am never more confident and comfortable than when I am riding. Heh, go figure.
    I do quite a bit of both, and I will say this: there's nothing like the experience of a well-struck golf ball.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donster View Post
    I do quite a bit of both, and I will say this: there's nothing like the experience of a well-struck golf ball.
    Well there is that. I shot 81 a couple of weeks ago (I'm a 15 HC), so it was "one of those days"...but a bad round since then made me wish I'd ridden the bike instead.

  9. #24
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    i would always carry my Camelbak with me, but only drank from it when i stopped. For the past 2 years or so I have taken to wearing it, and drinking from it about every 10-15 minutes. I find that i stay much more refreshed and alert throughout a full riding day by doing so. And, it forces more frequent stops along the way. having to pee really forces wakefulness!
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  10. #25
    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
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    I drink a lot of espresso regardless. Long riding days don't adversely affect me at all, if I have the right clothing in cold weather, and if I am dressed light enough in hot weather. I posted somewhere else about roughly 11 hours with no more than a 30 minute lunch break and two 10 minute fuel/pit stops, and I felt like a million bucks that night and the next morning.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

  11. #26
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    +1 Camelbak

    Bikerfish nailed the right advice for avoiding dehydration.

    If riding in the west, and especially in hot weather, -- my opinion, for what it's worth -- is that you CANNOT stay properly hydrated by drinking only at gas stops. And, many times these western roads have few-and-far-between gas stops, anyway. Try crossing the Mojave in summer heat without a Camelbak, and you might not make it.

    When we get dehydrated, the first thing to go is the "judgment/reaction" part of the old walnut. . .not the best thing to lose when on two wheels.

    AGE is a huge factor in both fatigue and recovery time. An older person can be in great physical shape, do everything "right" - good sleep, etc., and might still feel tired the day after fatiguing activity -- (that would be some hours of concentrated riding, versus a round of cow-pasture pool.)

    Learning to pace oneself as we age is part of the deal, and trying to conform to another's regimen may not be a good idea. I intend to keep riding until they pry my cold, dead fingers from the bars, face set in a final smile.

    Walking Eagle

  12. #27
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    I did 108 miles on mountain canyon roads today...two days after doing the same ride. I felt no fatigue at all. But...I attribute this to water, good diet and (this is huge, since I can vouch for the difference in not wearing them) good earplugs. Holy cow...I cannot believe how much better my rides have been since I cut the noise. In fact, I have NO IDEA how I did this ride without them.

  13. #28
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    Last summer I rode straight through from Vancouver BC to Las Vegas Nevada, a total distance of a little over 1300 miles. It took just about 20 hours. I drank a lot of water, ate several power bars and took 4 or 5 naps of 20-30 minutes in grassy areas at rest stops. I intentionally did not eat any large meals since I am aware that a meal can tend to make me sleepy. Even with these precautions that I considered reasonable, when after covering about 1,000 miles I pulled into Ely Nevada for my last gas stop, I forgot to put my feet down when I pulled up and stopped at the gas pump. Fortunately, I prevented the tip over, but it was close. I made it on into Las Vegas without incident. However, there is no question that I was not ridding safely for the last 400 miles or so and I will never attempt such a ride again.

  14. #29
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    I think a certain level of fitness is important for distance riding. Heat, wind buffeting, vibration, continually concentrating, it takes it out of you.

    Core fitness will help prevent back issues.

    Also, as we age, we lose muscle mass (Sarcopenia), and anaerobic workouts can reduce the loss.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  15. #30
    Fidster
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    My hands fall asleep

    I rode a cruiser for 3 years and never had any problems. Then I bought a K1200rs and a few months after that a new pair of size Large Dainese gloves. Shortly thereafter I began to experience my hands falling asleep / going numb. I don't know if it is the gloves or the riding position of the bike. Gloves are size large and I don't have XL hands.

    Maybe the gloves have shrunk over time? I live in CA and they have probably absorbed a lot of sweat. They are pretty tight. I can't recall if they were looser when I first purchased them.

    I believe the prior owner of the K1200 added risers. I have the old mounts and the ones on the bike look to be taller and adjusted up all the way.

    Anyone else have this happen to them?

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