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Thread: This never ends well......

  1. #16
    drgnhtr
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    A couple of friends and I were on our way to Yellowstone when a moose came down off the hill and ran across the road. I was riding second and far enough back that I didn't have to panic brake but the guy in front was smoking his tires slowing down but managed to avoid contact. I still remember thinking in the middle of the action " If he ducks he can go under."

  2. #17
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    Actually, not sure what the ground clearance is from an adult moose's hooves to its belly. Nor the ground clearance of a sport bike. Might be best to measure them then try it with a complete taxidermy mount moose which couldn't move at an inopportune moment. (If the measurements work, you can be sure it will soon be posted on YouTube.)

    In eastern B.C. the BIG animal to watch out for is elk. Similar weight to moose I believe. On the highways there I have yet to encounter either a deer or elk, but I only ride only during full daylight. A friend who lived there for a many years tells me it can be very scary at night, especially when elk cross the highway only to encounter a tall fence and are then forced back across the highway. My friend always set his cruise control in the car at 80 kmp and was lucky to get by with a few close calls.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  3. #18
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    I bought a bike from a guy in Anchorage who was in a cast. He showed me his K100 that went under a moose without sustaiing much damage. The rider, however, did not fit under the moose.
    Kevin Huddy
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  4. #19
    Registered User xp8103's Avatar
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    I'm not sure that under is the solution. But taking it head on isn't gonna work either.
    Nik #140220 - '88 K75C | '96 R1100RS | '77 R100RS | '06 DL650
    '01 525iT (oOO=00=OOo)

    Helmets don't save lives but loud pipes do?

  5. #20
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    I found this Critter Curriculum piece from the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. According to this the average moose belly is 35 inches off the ground. If you choose the 'belly pass' on average then, based on this and given the average seat height of a BMW, your bike may make it with some damage but you won't even if you are hanging off the side. We need to come up with another tactic to recommend to the MSF to teach.


    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

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  6. #21
    Registered User dwyandell's Avatar
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    Going under a moose isnt gonna work. Your bike may make it, but you won't.

    The solution is to not hit them. Whether that means going around them, stopping before you get to them, or not riding at night when moose are freakin impossible to see, MISS them. You can't predict what they are going to do--they arent afraid of things, so they may not run away. . . but they generally move more slowly and purposefully than a deer or horse. And if you happen to be motorcycling through an area and start to see logging trucks carrying a large piece of I-beam the full width of the truck, welded about 3' out in front of the bumper, about 4' off the ground . .. slow down, you're in moose country.

    BTW most of the time horses will spook BACK, not forwards. If you come upon a horse standing in the middle of the road (e.g. at night) and you can't stop in time, go in FRONT of them IF you have a choice. Horses generally take a step or two back when something surprises them, and dodging BEHIND a horse standing in the road is likely to get you killed.
    Dave in Vermont
    '84 R80ST
    '81 R100 hack

  7. #22
    Jack Herbst
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    Quote Originally Posted by drgnhtr View Post
    A couple of friends and I were on our way to Yellowstone when a moose came down off the hill and ran across the road. I was riding second and far enough back that I didn't have to panic brake but the guy in front was smoking his tires slowing down but managed to avoid contact. I still remember thinking in the middle of the action " If he ducks he can go under."
    Surely you JEST----bug breath!
    "All my life I wanted to be somebody. Now I realize I should have been more specific."

  8. #23
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    I did a 2-year stint in Saudi Arabia for ARAMCO. Over there it was camels. Just like moose, they are high enough to come through your windshield and impossible to see at night.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  9. #24
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwyandell View Post
    Going under a moose isnt gonna work. Your bike may make it, but you won't.[snip] . .. slow down, you're in moose country.

    BTW most of the time horses will spook BACK, not forwards. [snip].
    Fun rider legend kind of idea to play with but you are right. Slowing down is the best advice.

    As for horse v moose behavior I don't know. IIRC the advice given when I have backpacked in moose country we were warned they will stand their ground and charge. The suggestion was to back off and view from a distance while waiting to proceed with our hike. I have only encountered one on a bike in upstate NY. I stopped. We looked at each other. I was fascinated. The moose got bored and walked off. I started breathing again and road off.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

  10. #25
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    Gee, nobody on this thread yet from Australia and their thoughts about kangaroos? Or in North America, bears?

    My one serious thought on this subject is that you can ALMOST eliminate the possibility of collision with the larger creatures (with the exception of deer) if you only ride when there is full day light.

    That is my choice. If you chose to ride from dusk to dawn, even with enhanced lighting, I believe you are greatly increasing your chances of a collision with a large animal. But of course it is your choice. We all get to chose our risks/rewards ratio.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  11. #26
    100,000+ miler 32232's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    My one serious thought on this subject is that you can ALMOST eliminate the possibility of collision with the larger creatures (with the exception of deer) if you only ride when there is full day light.
    Yeah, deer are a wild card. The one I hit and the closest call otherwise have been mid-afternoon on a sunny day.
    Dave

    '06 Triumph Scrambler (Trans-Labrador veteran)

  12. #27
    Registered User amiles's Avatar
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    A better choice of animal crossing points by the highway departments would certainly help. Moving the signs/crossings to areas of greater sight distances would be a simple inexpensive matter.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    Gee, nobody on this thread yet from Australia and their thoughts about kangaroos? Or in North America, bears?

    My one serious thought on this subject is that you can ALMOST eliminate the possibility of collision with the larger creatures (with the exception of deer) if you only ride when there is full day light.

    That is my choice. If you chose to ride from dusk to dawn, even with enhanced lighting, I believe you are greatly increasing your chances of a collision with a large animal. But of course it is your choice. We all get to chose our risks/rewards ratio.
    With the drought this summer, the deer were moving a lot during the day having a hard time getting good browse and having to travel a long way to water. You have to watch ALL THE TIME. Just better odds during the day.

    Rod

  14. #29
    neanderssance man sedanman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amiles View Post
    A better choice of animal crossing points by the highway departments would certainly help. Moving the signs/crossings to areas of greater sight distances would be a simple inexpensive matter.

    Yeah, move the signs! Then teach the wildlife to read!
    Paul
    "Friends don't let friends ride junk!"
    2011 R1200RT

  15. #30
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    You might think that "natural selection" would lead to fewer deer jumping out in front or into vehicles. Those that do usually don't get another chance to breed - and I've certainly seen a lot of deer along roads that didn't exhibit this suicidal (and homicidal) instinct.

    Who knows how animals think. We've had cats for some 40 years now at the same place with a fairly busy road fronting our place. A couple have been killed by cars. Of the three currently in residence, two for some reason have never been seen crossing the road. The old tom cat does it several times a day - and I have watched him amble across the road. Think he has figured out cars and bikes.

    Or maybe he is just a cat with the extra lives the dead ones used up. About 5 years ago he had such a bad head infection (from a fight) that we actually dug his grave. Decided to give him another day before I put him out of his misery with a .22. He started to heal, so I put away the gun. And he is still with us.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

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