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Thread: Which Way Do I Turn The Wheel WHen I Park?

  1. #1
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    Which Way Do I Turn The Wheel WHen I Park?

    I am a new rider and have a 2012 F650 GS. Question: Which Way Do I Turn The Wheel When I Park? Most bikes I see parked have the front tire facing driver left but at BMW Performance Center they told us turn to Driver Right. You can only lock it with the key when turned Left so maybe that is a clue - any opinions? I know a stupid newbie question but I have to ask! No matter which way I turn it I alway feel the bike is going to tip over - so scary for a newbie! And does it matter if you are on a hill??

    Thanks!

    Jay

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    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) curriculum says to turn the wheel to the left for added stability. In my experience this works the significant majority of the time, but on on rough and uneven terrain turning to the right sometimes feels right for me.

    You say you are new to riding. Have you taken the MSF Basic Course?

    Welcome to the forum, Jay! Please take some time to fill out your profile and signature line and tell us a bit about yourself.
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    Registered User stkmkt1's Avatar
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    The bike should be parked with the wheel turned toward the direction it leans when on the sidestand. This gives it additional stability when parked. Another reason to park in this manner, AND to lock your wheels is so just in case someone comes along and decides to climb on your bike, (it can happen) just to sit on it, they are much less likely to tip it over.

    Since you are new, another tip. IF you own a motorbike with a center stand, and it is a windy day, do not use the center stand. Use the side stand, lean the bike into the wind, and make sure you lock the front wheels to keep them in place.

    Even with my big GSA, the wind can nearly blow it over unless it is on the side stand. And the wind I'm talking is the stuff over about 30 -35 mph.

    I've also been in winds gusting up to over 55 mph on a bike and my recommendation for that is STOP! That stuff is nasty to ride in.
    '09 BMW 1200 GSA, 2013 BMW 700GS, 2000 Goldwing SE, '09' V Star 950, '09 Honda Rebel,
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    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Smile

    Turn wheel to the left every time. It helps press maximum pressure (weight) on that side stand and keeps the bike stabily parked.

    Lock forks if leaving unattended.

    Enjoy every mile you put on!
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

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    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Sometimes the contrarian, unless I am in a tricky (grass, dirt, stones) spot, I stop, put down the sidestand, and get off, and take off my helmet. The front wheel finds its happy spot to the left. Oh, and I've never used a fork lock in my life.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    I've used the fork lock a few times by accident.... Makes for some unwanted excitement.
    Kevin Huddy
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    Fred Trimble
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    I've always parked it with the whell to the left, also. However, at the BMW Performance Center when I took a course in June, a big point was made to turn the wheel to the right. It was pointed out that this makes it easier to grab the handlebars when you mount. I'm still turning the wheel to the left.
    Fred Trimble
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  8. #8
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    I think it depends on whether you are in the northern or southern hemisphere. Or maybe whether you are east or west of the International Date Line
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  9. #9
    Geeser
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    Quote Originally Posted by 35675 View Post
    I've always parked it with the whell to the left, also. However, at the BMW Performance Center when I took a course in June, a big point was made to turn the wheel to the right. It was pointed out that this makes it easier to grab the handlebars when you mount.
    that's what I remember from the class too.
    But I still go to the left
    Marty
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  10. #10
    IBA #44567 Ken F's Avatar
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    Parking with your front wheel turned right will make your bike lean further left.

    With the wheel turned to the right, the center of your front wheel tread is on the ground, whereas parking with it turned left the tire is resting off the center of the tread, and slightly lower.

    Ken
    IBA #44567 Pres. Springfield BMW Roadriders
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
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  11. #11
    NC Piedmont Rider ncstephen's Avatar
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    would it matter which side you mount/dismount on. I do on the right side. The bars are open like a door, easy to grab the bar/brake in mounting/dismount then.

    NCS
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCStephen View Post
    would it matter which side you mount/dismount on. I do on the right side. The bars are open like a door, easy to grab the bar/brake in mounting/dismount then.

    NCS
    I jump on from the back like they used to do in the old westerns.

  13. #13
    NC Piedmont Rider ncstephen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wdt650 View Post
    I jump on from the back like they used to do in the old westerns.
    I have looked at that... with the bags on... I think I would maybe get almost high enough before precious body parts would be impacting the rear rack and torn across the back of the seat followed by my face hitting the hump on the back of the tank... (to some that might be an improvement )

    I generally do have the bars turned to the left unless I need the extra lean due to the surface grade making the bike have little lean, so then I do turn them to the right.

    NCS
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  14. #14
    Dale Rudolph
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    90% of the time I park using the centerstand. The wheel usually ends up pointing straight ahead.

  15. #15
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RUDYJO View Post
    90% of the time I park using the centerstand. The wheel usually ends up pointing straight ahead.
    Why?
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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