Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 33

Thread: Too tall or too short - my dilemma

  1. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Piedmont area of NC.
    Posts
    723
    I agree that being able to put your feet both flat on the ground is nice and may be overated.
    BUT !!
    Having a 28" inseam and riding has always been a problem on anything but a cruiser styled M/C.
    Cruisers make my back hurt so I stopped riding them.

    As I get older ( 68 yesterday) I find my balance is not what it used to be , so getting as close to flat foot as possible at stops is a good thing, for me at least.

    I deal with the center stand issue as best as I can, and usually only park the bike up that way if i am not going to ride for a few days or maintenance.

  2. #17
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Spring Lake NJ, USA
    Posts
    7,633
    Quote Originally Posted by Rtowne View Post
    With the lowered suspension what do you do about the side and center stands? It seems that the center stand may then be too tall and hard to get it up without breaking your back or at least needing help.

    Have any of you who've lowered your bike had any problems?
    I've done absolutely nothing. My R1200R is lowered about 15-20mm or so.. and it really isn't a problem putting it on the centerstand due to the excellent design of the centerstand. Put weight on the centerstand tang, pull up on the frame and UP it goes. It usually only is on the centerstand in my garage, just for better space utilization. When touring/riding/whatever-else, it stays on the sidestand.

    The only time the sidestand might trouble me is when I try using it in a spot where the road/parking/whatever slopes down from port to starboard (left and right for landlubbers..) In those cases the stand actually is pretty useless.. but typically by maneuvering the bike around a bit I can find an orientation that works. At least so far (or I'd be stuck on the bike eh?)

    For those people lucky enough to have a 30" inseam - don't go dissing' people who want a lower bike. Some of us are old, short of inseam (27" on a tall day), rotund in shape, and tired of fighting their bikes. It's better the bike is modified to make US comfortable, rather then trying to always overcome what can be a real problem.

    For the OP - I'd suggest an R1200R test ride. Take your checkbook. It's very quickly becoming the most popular bike in our local club. Out of about 65 members, we now have at least 6 people riding R12Rs.. more R12R riders then GS riders easily now. And almost everyone bought one because they were tired of the weight and bulk of the other bikes.

    The R12R works just fine for touring, easy to farkle up for touring, and equally easy to strip down for fun. It's the swiss-army knife of BMW bikes IMHO.. does all things quite well actually.

    BTW - if the side/center-stands really concern you, BMW sells shorter ones for their factory lowered R12R.. and it's not a big deal to swap them.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  3. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Piedmont area of NC.
    Posts
    723
    I agree about the R models, best value in the line IMHO.
    Only thing I wish they would make an option would be electronic cruise control.

  4. #19
    Registered User ANDYVH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Green Bay, WI, west side about 1.5 miles from Lambeau.
    Posts
    1,419
    Sorry, didn't mean to be dissing on anyone regarding flat-footing a bike. Just that I hear it soo much, even from a lot of riders who are clearly not inseam-challenged. My perspective is a bit biased for sure, being a long term MSF instructor I have lived the MSF guidelines for many years and get lots of practice at it regularly.

    To some riders on the flat-foot issue, I first suggest taking a rider course that builds more confidence in the rider, rather than first modifying the bike, or in some cases, compromising the bike for those moments of slow speed/stopped riding. I feel that a rider with more slow speed confidence/ability is less dependent on flat-footing a bike.

    Perhaps a bit more understanding of the rider's perspective is better, such as age, leg/knee/hip issues, training background, etc. Kind of like when riders talk about mods/service to their bike, we have to know the model/age/service issues, etc.
    Woodenshoe to Cheesehead

  5. #20
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Braintree, MA
    Posts
    3,021

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    Perhaps a bit more understanding of the rider's perspective is better, such as age, leg/knee/hip issues, training background, etc. Kind of like when riders talk about mods/service to their bike, we have to know the model/age/service issues, etc.
    I'm 6 feet tall, but the height comes from my torso, not my legs. I get it about the training, have 100k+ miles under my wheels and I can do a ride on a "tippy toe bike", just would rather not -- I will drop it. I'd add shoulders, ankles, and sciatica to your worn out/damaged body parts list.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  6. #21
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    722
    Only being able to get your toes on the ground on flat pavement may be just fine for riders with strong legs who are are also skilled enough to put their RIGHT foot down when that is the high side on a slope and never lean their bike to the right when they intended to lean it left at at stop.

    I believe those of us with weaker legs and ablilties can avoid a lot of zero MPH tipovers by having a bike we can "flat foot." Don't forget these accidents can be painful as well as expensive.

    I can flat-foot my current bike. I couldn't do so with the KTM I rode in NZ and twice came a fraction from dropping it backing it into a parking spot.

    So, it is not what short legged experts can do on your bike that matters. It is what YOU can do.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  7. #22
    Registered User ANDYVH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Green Bay, WI, west side about 1.5 miles from Lambeau.
    Posts
    1,419
    True on all counts. I stand,...sit, corrected.

    I have to say, that working floor sales at a BMW dealership, I see a lot of riders struggle to simply swing a leg over most of the BMWs in the product line. Sometimes its almost embarrassing to watch someone try to swing a leg over the bike. I am very fortunate, that even at 54, I can easily swing my lower leg higher than the pivot of my hip joint. That's not the case for many my age and younger.

    Perhaps Harley did the marketing years ago, and saw the age group/demographic developing, that would find a very low seat height/easy swing over bike very desirable. It does look a far bit more easy and natural to swing a leg over a Harley than a BMW.
    Woodenshoe to Cheesehead

  8. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Piedmont area of NC.
    Posts
    723
    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    True on all counts. I stand,...sit, corrected.

    I have to say, that working floor sales at a BMW dealership, I see a lot of riders struggle to simply swing a leg over most of the BMWs in the product line. Sometimes its almost embarrassing to watch someone try to swing a leg over the bike. I am very fortunate, that even at 54, I can easily swing my lower leg higher than the pivot of my hip joint. That's not the case for many my age and younger.

    Perhaps Harley did the marketing years ago, and saw the age group/demographic developing, that would find a very low seat height/easy swing over bike very desirable. It does look a far bit more easy and natural to swing a leg over a Harley than a BMW.
    One more reason why i hope the new C650GT is a big seller here.

  9. #24
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    between SanAntone & the Weird Place, TX
    Posts
    5,747
    Quote Originally Posted by deilenberger View Post
    For the OP - I'd suggest an R1200R test ride. Take your checkbook. It's very quickly becoming the most popular bike in our local club. Out of about 65 members, we now have at least 6 people riding R12Rs.. more R12R riders then GS riders easily now. And almost everyone bought one because they were tired of the weight and bulk of the other bikes.

    The R12R works just fine for touring, easy to farkle up for touring, and equally easy to strip down for fun. It's the swiss-army knife of BMW bikes IMHO.. does all things quite well actually.
    Met up with some of our clubmates for Sunday breakfast yesterday...4 R12R's out of 8 bikes...They are not a rare sight around here.
    I was on our R12S so no GS's at all. I ride Helen's and have to agree...it is a great do everything bike. I recall reading some post some time back saying most R owners will eventually get a RT, I think it's the other way around from what I have seen.
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  10. #25
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    722
    Quote Originally Posted by tommcgee View Post
    I tip them over even when I can flat foot, but the incidence is a lot less. The ground also has a habit of not being level.

    The problem is ripping my shoulders when trying to save them from the fall. I know it's too heavy once it starts to go, but the reaction is too strong.
    There most certainly are strong, athletic, expert riders with shorter inseams who do just fine on on taller bikes. Does that describe you? Doesn't describe me. When I rode that KTM in NZ a couple years ago which had me on tippy toes on flat pavement, I'm proud to say I never dropped it. But it was VERY close several times. Do you need this added worry on your bike?

    For many of us less than expert riders, being able to "flat foot" the bike saves us both pain and dollars. My bike hasn't been on its side for over three years.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  11. #26
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Marion VA-In the middle of some of the best riding in the country.
    Posts
    3,207
    Quote Originally Posted by 40427 View Post
    One more reason why i hope the new C650GT is a big seller here.
    The scooters are tall. Their seat is higher and wider than the K1600GTL and similar to a GS.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  12. #27
    Registered User cowboyatheart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Garden Bay, BC, Canada
    Posts
    381
    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    True on all counts. I stand,...sit, corrected.

    Perhaps Harley did the marketing years ago, and saw the age group/demographic developing, that would find a very low seat height/easy swing over bike very desirable. It does look a far bit more easy and natural to swing a leg over a Harley than a BMW.
    Yeah but who in their right mind wants to ride one? I'm just kidding.

    I think that's true, and a lot of people seem to like riding that style of motorcycle. I have to put up with the tall bike because I like BMWs form and function over a cruiser style bike.

    I am now 52, and can see a day when my RT is going to be too tall and too heavy. That's unfortunate because the electronic wind screen, the cruise control, and the other nice items on the bike really make it comfortable for riding in all kinds of weather.

    My inseam is 28 inches and it would sure be nice if BMW made an RT where a 28 inch inseam could actually flatfoot the bike.
    Cowboy at Heart, info@meet-moringa.com
    All in one Nutrition. Energy. Weight loss. Skin Care.
    www.Meet-Moringa.com For optimum health, energy & beauty.

  13. #28
    Registered User der verge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Clinton Twp Mi
    Posts
    131
    I would try to find an already lowered bike to test ride before you lower yours. I know this is not the same bike, but same type of situation. I have a F650 that was factory low suspension. I just recently put it back to "stock" full height. The ride quality is unbelievably better now than it was when it was lower. I would hate to see you lower the bike and come to hate the ride.
    02' K12LT ~ 83K '97 F650GS ~ 32K' 81 XS400 ~ 9K
    MOA #184190 Club #231 48035

  14. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Piedmont area of NC.
    Posts
    723
    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyatheart View Post
    Yeah but who in their right mind wants to ride one? I'm just kidding.

    I think that's true, and a lot of people seem to like riding that style of motorcycle. I have to put up with the tall bike because I like BMWs form and function over a cruiser style bike.

    I am now 52, and can see a day when my RT is going to be too tall and too heavy. That's unfortunate because the electronic wind screen, the cruise control, and the other nice items on the bike really make it comfortable for riding in all kinds of weather.

    My inseam is 28 inches and it would sure be nice if BMW made an RT where a 28 inch inseam could actually flatfoot the bike.
    My friend John has a 2010 Rt that he bought with the low suspension and the low seat. He has about a 28 or 29" inseam .
    The combination of the low suspension and seat caused his knees to be bent so much they hurt. He bought a standard height seat recently and it's better.

  15. #30
    Caribbean Druid dwestly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    607
    Quote Originally Posted by Rtowne View Post
    Hey Andy:
    Thanks for the advice. What prompted you to buy a 1200 R vs a RT? Most of my riding is around town with one or two over-night trips a year. Do you ever take your bike on the road? What about wind pressure and/or protection on the road.

    I've been looking at and thinking about trading for an R1200RT. With the liquid cooled engine coming out in '13 I'm going to wait and see if it's what I want or go for a '12.

    The Wilbur's are an interesting thought and something I'll consider if I decide to keep the GS.
    My wife had an RT for about 2 years and just swapped it this past year for an R. She's much happier with the R. The R is lighter, more maneuverable and quicker (same engine, a lot lighter). She put a Cee Bailey's windscreen on it which gives great coverage, the full set of bags (the small topcase included), a ZUMO 665 w/XM/Weather Radar, Touratech hand guards and some other stuff. She says the only thing she misses is the cruise control, but since 90 percent of her riding is day trips, no biggie. For two-up or lots of long distance, the RT is better but for all-around use, the R, hands down.
    MSF RiderCoach, Sport Bike Coach, Track Junkie, IBA, MSTA, AMA, HRCA, Factor Demo Rider
    2012 BMW R1200GS, 2013 Ducati Hypermotard SP, 1990 Honda GB500TT
    Helmetless riders=Darwinism in action.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •