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Thread: Is what we do really so shocking?

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    Rapunzel NewEnglander's Avatar
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    Is what we do really so shocking?

    Yesterday at work I was doing some tasks in a common area and one of our administrative assistants who was also getting some work done stopped what she was doing and came over to me and said "I hear you went on an adventure."

    "What? An adventure? I took two weeks of vacation if that's what you mean."

    "Well, I heard that you took a trip on your motorcycle," with a little awe in her voice.

    "Oh, yes, I went to Missouri."

    "All the way to Missouri?"

    "Yes."

    "On your motorcycle???"

    "Yes. I went to a BMW motorcycle rally out there."

    "By yourself??? All that way????"

    "Well.... Yes. I had a great time."

    "By yourself? I mean, weren't you nervous? All that way?"

    "Well, you do have to exercise some common sense in your dealings with people and other drivers and always be alert to what's going on around you. But, no, not nervous. I've been out west twice before."

    "By yourself?????"

    "Yes."

    The conversation went on from there and I ended up explaining a little about the MOA, the national rally, and how it's held in a different part of the country every year. Etc., etc. She was just incredulous that I went off to places hither and yon on my bike and by myself. Everyone I interact with at work knows that I ride and have been riding since 1981. I had no idea that this activity of mine was fodder for the rumor mill as I tend to not get involved in the rumor game and the water cooler conversation. This woman has known forever that I ride. So, I've come away from the conversation sort of surprised and bemused. I mean, is it really such a shocking thing to others, especially non-riders, that as a woman I ride... alone... and go on long trips? What is so surprising about this? It's just an activity I enjoy doing - like reading and snorkeling. Albeit, I'm a bit more passionate about the riding these days, but to me it's just a normal thing to do. So, I'm curious, what other conversations have you women had regarding being a motorcyclist and how have you been made aware that what you do, ride, is such a surprising thing? What totally off-the-wall things have you heard and had said to you?

    Just wondering... Louise

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    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    She has led too sheltered a life. What you do is an achievement, no doubt, but her reaction comes from her own inner fears.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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    ABC,AMA(LIFE),MOA,RA,IBMW MANICMECHANIC's Avatar
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    If I may be so bold, but does anybody remember when people going on a cross-country journey on a motorcycle considered it an adventure? Beginning with the preparation of the bike, getting your gear together, departing with some anxiety about whether you'll "make it" or not. The challenges along the way that were dealt with, the weather experienced, the scenery encountered, the adversity met and surpassed. Indeed, it was an adventure. Nowadays it seems that just anybody can climb on a bike and expect to arrive wherever in utmost comfort with utter reliability, and only be able to complain about the weather being too.....uncomfortable. It appears that there are too many who are unwilling to deal with the challenge. The trip's success must be a foregone conclusion. Where is the adventure and concomitant satisfaction in that?
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    Registered User dancogan's Avatar
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    My wife and I left home on our motorcycle (Can Am trike) last year and headed for Glacier National Park. We got home about 2 1/2 weeks later, having faced heat, rain, roads under water, the need to be towed to a dealer and some fabulous rides through beautiful country. We considered it an adventure when we left and even more so when we got home.
    Dan

  5. #5
    Rapunzel NewEnglander's Avatar
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    Adventures

    Quote Originally Posted by manicmechanic View Post
    If I may be so bold, but does anybody remember when people going on a cross-country journey on a motorcycle considered it an adventure? Beginning with the preparation of the bike, getting your gear together, departing with some anxiety about whether you'll "make it" or not. The challenges along the way that were dealt with, the weather experienced, the scenery encountered, the adversity met and surpassed. Indeed, it was an adventure. Nowadays it seems that just anybody can climb on a bike and expect to arrive wherever in utmost comfort with utter reliability, and only be able to complain about the weather being too.....uncomfortable. It appears that there are too many who are unwilling to deal with the challenge. The trip's success must be a foregone conclusion. Where is the adventure and concomitant satisfaction in that?
    Of course the trip is an adventure. That is why it is so much fun! Before each trip I say to myself, usually just after I've finished packing the bike, a line from The Lord of the Rings said by Bilbo as he boards the ship for 'the West', "I believe I'm ready for another adventure!". The other thing I do as I'm sitting on the bike and the garage door has closed and I'm ready to roll is that I take a couple of minutes in thought/prayer to find the calm and confidence within to make and enjoy the coming trip.

    Since the catastrophic failure of the clutch on my bike last fall, I no longer assume that my steed is infallible so that element is now part of the adventure. In all my years of riding I found out on Labor Day that the Anonymous book really works!

  6. #6
    Rapunzel NewEnglander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    She has led too sheltered a life. What you do is an achievement, no doubt, but her reaction comes from her own inner fears.
    Which makes me wonder, are there still such timid women?

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    Registered User Rod Sheridan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewEnglander View Post
    Which makes me wonder, are there still such timid women?
    Fortunately for me, they're not in my circle of friends.........Rod.
    Work is the curse of the riding class

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Fortunately for me, they're not in my circle of friends.........Rod.
    That's cool, Rod!!! I'm glad you appreciate we adventurous women! It appears you are married to one yourself! Woo hoo!
    Tonya
    2007 F800ST - Lovin' it!!

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    Registered User Rod Sheridan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnevling View Post
    That's cool, Rod!!! I'm glad you appreciate we adventurous women! It appears you are married to one yourself! Woo hoo!
    Life's too short to spend it with the bland....................Rod.
    Work is the curse of the riding class

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    Dee G flymymbz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewEnglander View Post
    Which makes me wonder, are there still such timid women?
    Yup. I used to belong to a women's motorcycle forum, and a bunch of them wanted to go on a week long trip. As the plans for the trip evolved, I would have to say that about 3/4 of the interested women changed their minds when they found out that spouses were not invited.

    Seems that these women were too afraid to leave the neighborhood without their spouse. What if my bike breaks down? What if I run out of gas? What if something happens?

    arrrgghghhh! If I had to depend on my spouse to go with me, I would never get out of the driveway. Sell the bikes, ladies, and go back in the house because your embarrassing me. lol.
    Too damn many bikes to list

  11. #11
    HONDARIDER
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    LOL. My wife is pretty adventurous, but lacks the navigation skills required to find the mall. If she were to head out on a weeklong trip, we'd never see her again. I suppose that wouldn't stop her though so I guess I worry about it more than her. She routinely drives the 180 miles to her mother's house with nothing more than exit numbers on a post it note...no map...no route numbers...no towns...no clue. She just knows to get on I-90...go to exit 11A and get on another road...then exit 7 onto another...exit 12 onto yet another...and finally exit 7 into her mother's town. She has no clue if she's driving east, west, north, or south. She doesn't know where she is on a map, what towns she's passing, virtually nothing. Just 11a...7...12...7. I asked her what she'll do if she ever get off at the wrong exit and onto the wrong road...she says she'll figure it out. I guess she's actually more adventurous than I am. I'd never leave home if I didn't know for certain that I could find my way back.

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    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hondarider View Post
    LOL. My wife is pretty adventurous, but lacks the navigation skills required to find the mall. If she were to head out on a weeklong trip, we'd never see her again. I suppose that wouldn't stop her though so I guess I worry about it more than her. She routinely drives the 180 miles to her mother's house with nothing more than exit numbers on a post it note...no map...no route numbers...no towns...no clue. She just knows to get on I-90...go to exit 11A and get on another road...then exit 7 onto another...exit 12 onto yet another...and finally exit 7 into her mother's town. She has no clue if she's driving east, west, north, or south. She doesn't know where she is on a map, what towns she's passing, virtually nothing. Just 11a...7...12...7. I asked her what she'll do if she ever get off at the wrong exit and onto the wrong road...she says she'll figure it out. I guess she's actually more adventurous than I am. I'd never leave home if I didn't know for certain that I could find my way back.
    Lol. That's why I bought my wife a Garmin. I have read that men navigate by landmarks. I forget what they said about women and navigating.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

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    Dee G flymymbz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hondarider View Post
    LOL. My wife is pretty adventurous, but lacks the navigation skills required to find the mall. If she were to head out on a weeklong trip, we'd never see her again. I suppose that wouldn't stop her though so I guess I worry about it more than her. She routinely drives the 180 miles to her mother's house with nothing more than exit numbers on a post it note...no map...no route numbers...no towns...no clue. She just knows to get on I-90...go to exit 11A and get on another road...then exit 7 onto another...exit 12 onto yet another...and finally exit 7 into her mother's town. She has no clue if she's driving east, west, north, or south. She doesn't know where she is on a map, what towns she's passing, virtually nothing. Just 11a...7...12...7. I asked her what she'll do if she ever get off at the wrong exit and onto the wrong road...she says she'll figure it out. I guess she's actually more adventurous than I am. I'd never leave home if I didn't know for certain that I could find my way back.

    LOL. I am a 911 dispatcher and regularly take 911 calls from folks like your wife. Nothing against your wife, but I still cannot grasp how folks can get through life without knowing where they are. Its one of the most frustrating things for me: "911, what is the location of your emergency?" "I'm on the highway". "Which one?" "I don't know, the one that goes by the river." "Which river?" "I don't know."
    Too damn many bikes to list

  14. #14
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hondarider View Post
    LOL. My wife is pretty adventurous, but lacks the navigation skills required to find the mall. If she were to head out on a weeklong trip, we'd never see her again. I suppose that wouldn't stop her though so I guess I worry about it more than her. She routinely drives the 180 miles to her mother's house with nothing more than exit numbers on a post it note...no map...no route numbers...no towns...no clue. She just knows to get on I-90...go to exit 11A and get on another road...then exit 7 onto another...exit 12 onto yet another...and finally exit 7 into her mother's town. She has no clue if she's driving east, west, north, or south. She doesn't know where she is on a map, what towns she's passing, virtually nothing. Just 11a...7...12...7. I asked her what she'll do if she ever get off at the wrong exit and onto the wrong road...she says she'll figure it out. I guess she's actually more adventurous than I am. I'd never leave home if I didn't know for certain that I could find my way back.

    She needa a Zumo and you need a spot tracker to see where she is!

  15. #15
    Registered User Bullett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewEnglander View Post
    Which makes me wonder, are there still such timid women?

    I'm always amazed when I speak to people who have never been outside of their hometown. In Salt Lake City, I have talked to people who have never been up on the several canyons near town. I'm thankful to have the opportunity to live a different lifestyle.
    Sharon
    '07 R1200RT (my favorite!); '12 Yamaha Super Tenere (El Gordo); '07 Suzuki DR650SE (!);
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