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Thread: Proficient cornering...

  1. #61
    Caribbean Druid
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    Actually, good riding is a Zen thing. When you become truly proficient on the bike, you will actually forget its under you. You will start feeling the road thru the contact patches, and your movement and movement of the bike will feel as one. It is at that point that any corrections tend to become automatic, allowing your focus to remain on your path and the surrounding environment. How do you get to this point? Ride, ride, ride. Training, training, training...then more ride, ride, ride. LOL

    Constantly work on your riding technique. Take classes. Look to other good, experienced riders and talk with them. I ride with a couple of different groups, both on the track and on the street. We will routinely discuss lines, corners, techniques together. We should all be learning constantly. I learn something everytime I go out on a track session. The challenge is when you start to develop real skill. At that point it is like any other activity. The more skilled you become, the more of a challenge it is to advance that skill. Of course, if it wasn't a challenge, it wouldn't be any fun!

    Good Luck!

  2. #62
    neanderssance man sedanman's Avatar
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    dwesty, Your photos have humbled the rest of us.
    Paul
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    2011 R1200RT

  3. #63
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    i've got issues with that Elvis knee on the Dragon. what's that doing there?
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  4. #64
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    Just reflex from my track riding...its really silly when I'm in the car, look left around the corner and bang my knee into the door...

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwestly View Post
    Just reflex from my track riding...its really silly when I'm in the car, look left around the corner and bang my knee into the door...
    oh, probably better than inadvertantly shifting gears with your right knee.

    you know its serious when you open the car door to put a foot down at stops.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  6. #66
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  7. #67
    Biker gunnert's Avatar
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    1. Lee Parks Total Control; and then
    2. Reg's CLASS

    Lee Parks class teaches techniques in a parking lot. Once you have the basics, the CLASS course is AWESOME. I've been riding for over 40 years and learned more when I attended the 2 day CLASS at VIR than I had learned in the previous 37 years! I'm not exaggerating. A track is the SAFEST place to practice your cornering at speed and the instructors are more than willing to give you pointers to sharpen your riding. If you don't come away as a better rider after a couple of track days then give it up and buy a trike.

  8. #68
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    One more pic that really illustrates the difference in where you look. My wife, Becky, is on the white no. 90 CBR600RR as the group approaches Turns 5/6 at Barber. Turns 5/6 combo is a wide, left 180 degree corner. You can run it as either a single apex or double apex line. Note where her head and eyes are pointing, as opposed to the guy in front of her. Right after this shot was taken, the lead rider ran wide (right where he was looking) and Becky neatly slid inside of him and around the turn.

    (It also didn't hurt that she was set up wider at the entry point and had a better line started thru the corner...)

    Last edited by dwestly; 08-20-2012 at 02:17 PM.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnert View Post
    1. Lee Parks Total Control; and then
    2. Reg's CLASS

    Lee Parks class teaches techniques in a parking lot. Once you have the basics, the CLASS course is AWESOME. I've been riding for over 40 years and learned more when I attended the 2 day CLASS at VIR than I had learned in the previous 37 years! I'm not exaggerating. A track is the SAFEST place to practice your cornering at speed and the instructors are more than willing to give you pointers to sharpen your riding. If you don't come away as a better rider after a couple of track days then give it up and buy a trike.
    I haven't been to the CLASS course, but have heard good things about it as well. You can't go wrong with a good track school. Riders who have never been may think it is all about racing, but that's not true. As you note, it is really about sharpening your riding skills. Speed on the track comes as a result of those skills. You're also right that if a rider doesn't come away from a good track school as a better street rider, they need to just give up the sport... LOL

  10. #70
    Polar Opposite
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    On a recent trip to South America one of our fellow participants was technically very skilled in cornering. This person dropped the bike six times over the two weeks. The problem with the roads was the lack of vision available and often increasing (dramatically) radius of the turn. After the first few scares I encountered, I made a mental note to not carry speed into any curve I could not see through. The skilled rider's bike ended up being carried in the back of the truck with bent forks. No blood was spilled, but I felt like the turtle versus the hare.

  11. #71
    Caribbean Druid
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    Sometimes being skilled in one enviroment causes over-confidence in other, unfamiliar terrain. Like I tell my students, a lot of crashes are a case of ego overcoming ability...

  12. #72
    Morning Person
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwestly View Post
    One more pic that really illustrates the difference in where you look. My wife, Becky, is on the white no. 90 CBR600RR as the group approaches Turns 5/6 at Barber. Turns 5/6 combo is a wide, left 180 degree corner. You can run it as either a single apex or double apex line. Note where her head and eyes are pointing, as opposed to the guy in front of her. Right after this shot was taken, the lead rider ran wide (right where he was looking) and Becky neatly slid inside of him and around the turn.

    (It also didn't hurt that she was set up wider at the entry point and had a better line started thru the corner...)

    Great photo...and good for you in the selection of your mate! I think it takes a special combination of intelligence and personality traits to ride competently...and Becky seems to possess both, if that photo is any indication. Lucky guy...


    Rode up the canyon 40 miles to a mountain town yesterday...really worked on the cornering. One thing I'm learning is I wasn't really getting my weight to the inside, and now that I am I feel as though I'm leading the bike through the turns, rather than being led by it, if that makes any sense. My speeds were higher, though that wasn't the point...but it did surprise me, because they didn't "feel" higher...and I felt more in control at those new speeds. Interesting...a work in progress, for sure.

  13. #73
    neanderssance man sedanman's Avatar
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    Also, don't wait until you are in a turn to move your body around. Get in the body position you want to be in before the turn. Use pressure on the outside (of the turn) to keep going straight. This way the bike is "preloaded" to turn. When you reach your turn point adjust the pressure on the bars and enjoy your turn. The idea is as Lee Parks puts it is to "be as invisible as possible to the bike". I want to take Lee's course again, do level 2 then go to Kieth Codes class etc, etc, etc. If I won lotto, I'd spend all of my time taking riding courses.
    Paul
    "Friends don't let friends ride junk!"
    2011 R1200RT

  14. #74
    Morning Person
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    Quote Originally Posted by sedanman View Post
    Also, don't wait until you are in a turn to move your body around. Get in the body position you want to be in before the turn. Use pressure on the outside (of the turn) to keep going straight. This way the bike is "preloaded" to turn. When you reach your turn point adjust the pressure on the bars and enjoy your turn. The idea is as Lee Parks puts it is to "be as invisible as possible to the bike". I want to take Lee's course again, do level 2 then go to Kieth Codes class etc, etc, etc. If I won lotto, I'd spend all of my time taking riding courses.
    Yes...I read that somewhere here...about being in position before the turn. I admit that felt a little strange yesterday, but your advice to counter the weight shift ahead of the turn with outside bar is good. Without that, I was heading into the apex too soon.

    This stuff is great...becoming a good rider takes work...which makes it worth doing. Too many people think (especially these days) that there are shortcuts to success. Nope...there never are. That's the way it should be...

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by windypoint View Post
    On a recent trip to South America one of our fellow participants was technically very skilled in cornering. This person dropped the bike six times over the two weeks. The problem with the roads was the lack of vision available and often increasing (dramatically) radius of the turn. After the first few scares I encountered, I made a mental note to not carry speed into any curve I could not see through. The skilled rider's bike ended up being carried in the back of the truck with bent forks. No blood was spilled, but I felt like the turtle versus the hare.
    methinks you meant "decreasing radius"- where the turn gets tighter than it began, often tossing a rider to the outside. an increasing radius corner is one that opens up as you go, and typically allows generous accelerations out of it. pretty rare to crash in increasing radii corners.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

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