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Thread: Transporting ? Removable In-Bed Chocks (F-150 & R1200RT)

  1. #1
    jay1622
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    Transporting ? Removable In-Bed Chocks (F-150 & R1200RT)

    Looking for recommendations...

    F-150 with a 5.5' bed and a R1200RT... Measurements put the rear tire patch between the pivot point of the tailgate and about two inches past.

    I am looking to buy a removable in-bed tire chock for my F-150/R1200RT. My buddy has one, but it is a cheaply built one (Dodge Ram/Harley Streetglide. The cool part about his is that when it is not in use, he removes the chock and all that is left is a small flat bracket towards the front of the bed (up by the cab). Also, has anyone had any experience loading a motorcycle with that new tailgate step Ford has. I can't imagine that lip, which come out and converts to a step, can take the weight of a bike. I'd hate to have to do the trailer route, but will if I have to. The Stinger looks interesting.

    Any and all thoughts are appreciated.

  2. #2
    On a Ride
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    I've had eight years of good results with the Baxley chock...

    http://www.baxleycompanies.com/

    I don't even fasten it down to the bed of the truck. The weight of the bike takes care of that. In the enclosed trailer I do fasten it down, but not in the back of the truck (F250). I have very good, curved ramps. I ride the bike up the ramp, into the chock I just placed, and tie it down. When unloading, I back it down the ramp steadily. Have done this 100's of times.

    The F250 tail gate handles just fine the weight of me and the bike, but not sure about the F150 gate you are mentioning.

  3. #3
    Blue Sky Canadian
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    Baxley

    +1 for the Baxley

  4. #4
    Registered User SeabeckS's Avatar
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    I have an older model F-150, without the folding step arrangement. But I think you're wise to consider the possibility of damaging that step if you'd do a lot of loading/unloading of a bike. My truck has carried a Ducati 900SS/BMW R1150R/and my current bike, an R1100S on several occasions. And even those "light weight" machines have caused a small, but noticeable bowing, in the tailgate over time. Nothing major at all, but I'd worry a bit about that folding step arrangement. Perhaps a 4 foot long piece of angle iron put in place temporarily would help?

    Also, if I were to buy a chock, I'd definitely consider the Baxley. Did some research on the available units sometime ago, and that seemed the best to me. FWIW! I've just managed by using several tie-downs and relatively wide folding ramp.

    And before any flamers out there jump on my case about hauling my bike...after nine heart surgeries I don't have the stamina to ride 800 or a 1000 miles to get to the places I want to ride my S. So, yeah, sometimes I haul my S a long ways.

    Cheers!
    Bill Johnston

  5. #5
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    http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com...eel-Chock.aspx

    I have the all aluminum chock from Condor with the small mounting plate that it locks on to. Works great and extremely well made. They do have a steel version for less

  6. #6
    Registered User rcliffor's Avatar
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    Sorry I do not have a picture, but I needed a chock a couple of years ago and just built one out of some scrap wood. I used 4x4's along the sides of the tires fastened to a board that touched the sidewalls to keep it centered. Worked great!
    2007 R1200GS

  7. #7
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by jay1622 View Post
    Looking for recommendations...

    F-150 with a 5.5' bed and a R1200RT... Measurements put the rear tire patch between the pivot point of the tailgate and about two inches past.

    I am looking to buy a removable in-bed tire chock for my F-150/R1200RT. My buddy has one, but it is a cheaply built one (Dodge Ram/Harley Streetglide. The cool part about his is that when it is not in use, he removes the chock and all that is left is a small flat bracket towards the front of the bed (up by the cab). Also, has anyone had any experience loading a motorcycle with that new tailgate step Ford has. I can't imagine that lip, which come out and converts to a step, can take the weight of a bike. I'd hate to have to do the trailer route, but will if I have to. The Stinger looks interesting.

    Any and all thoughts are appreciated.
    Installed this in my son's Dodge RAM. Works great! He removes it when no need to transport his big Honda ST1300, but installs in seconds and smoothly captures the front tire - actually holds entire bike upright without straps until you get a chance to secure those. Held the R1200RT nicely too.

    Not bad for a bike (ST1300) that weighs in at about 750# !


    http://www.discountramps.com/bike-pro-wheel-chock.htm
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
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  8. #8
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jay1622 View Post
    Looking for recommendations...

    ... Measurements put the rear tire patch between the pivot point of the tailgate and about two inches past.

    .
    Put a 4x8 piece of plywood in the bed to help transfer some of the rear wheel weight to the bed.


    I don't remember who makes it but this ramp works good. It's aluminum, come in two pieces and both pieces fold making it easier to haul in the bed. The two ramps pin together. Strap the ramp to the truck to make sure it does not slip off the tailgate.
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  9. #9
    John. jstrube's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post
    Installed this in my son's Dodge RAM. Works great! He removes it when no need to transport his big Honda ST1300, but installs in seconds and smoothly captures the front tire - actually holds entire bike upright without straps until you get a chance to secure those. Held the R1200RT nicely too.

    Not bad for a bike (ST1300) that weighs in at about 750# !


    http://www.discountramps.com/bike-pro-wheel-chock.htm
    Hey Kevin, I bought this for my toy hauler. I was wondering... It seems to pinch the front tire of my R1200RT, you know, collapses it where it Vees a bit. This is when I cinch the bike down. Yes, I am using the forks. Didn't know if this would damage tie tire or not.

    Other than that, it works fine. I am thinking of using the over the tire strap instead of a dual v strap tie down, any thoughts?

    Thanks,

    John.
    John.

  10. #10
    jay1622
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    This is What Happens When I Get Bored...

    Thank you all for your replies. The last thing I want in my new truck is a bowed-down tailgate, so I will take the advice and do something to prevent that. I'm thinking of one big sheet of plywood, cut to form-fit the bed. I have the bed line-x'ed, so even if it wasn't form-fitted, it's not going to slide. And even if it did... The form-cut width would prevent it from sliding side to side, and the form-cut around the wheel wells will prevent it from sliding backwards. Couple that with some direct-to-bed tie downs and it's not going anywhere. I can mount one of the chocks you all mentioned to the board with flushed anchoring brackets under the board. This will make it so I don't have to drill/tap the bed. I can even make a few tie-down anchors to secure random stuff in the bed too.

    (Insert Maniacal Laugh)

    Lastly, I got creative on a flight today while headed home and sketched some random stuff. Some of it's already been done. My buddy (Awesome Fabricator) will throw in my personal touches though (read stability). A spinnable bolt to support the weight there at the bottom. We're going to weld a secondary 2" receiver hitch so I can mount my mtn. bike carrier as well. It's amazing what someone will do for pizza and good beer.

    Thanks again all. Knowing me, I'll follow through with the above idea. I'll take pics and attach when I do.

    As usual... Any warnings and words of wisdom to the contrary are welcome.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by jay1622; 08-02-2012 at 10:51 AM.

  11. #11
    jay1622
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    The backside... Of the napkin.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  12. #12
    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    Great idea ... except --

    The only problem I see is with the screw-down support under the tailgate/ramp.

    When the bike's weight is passed into the bed of the truck, the truck will want to settle down on its suspension. With the fixed-length support, the support will hold the rear of the truck up via the receiver hitch receiver, so the truck can't settle. You'll now have what amounts to the weight of the bike pressing down on the screw-extension. This will likely result in effectively "locking" the extension in place (i.e., the bike's downward force on the support will likely cause the thread friction forces to be too high to allow you to rotate the screw back up into the support tube), so you won't be able to remove the support from the truck's receiver to head down the road.
    Last edited by mneblett; 08-02-2012 at 11:38 AM.
    Mark Neblett
    Fairfax, VA
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  13. #13
    jay1622
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    Quote Originally Posted by mneblett View Post
    Great idea ... except --

    The only problem I see is with the screw-down support under the tailgate/ramp.

    When the bike's weight is passed into the bed of the truck, the truck will want to settle down on its suspension. With the fixed-length support, the support will hold the rear of the truck up via the receiver hitch receiver, so the truck can't settle. You'll now have what amounts to the weight of the bike pressing down on the screw-extension. This will likely resulting in effectively "locking" the extention in place (i.e., the bike's downward force on the support will likely cause the thread friction forces to be too high to allow you to rotate the screw back up into the support tube), so you won't be able to remove the support from the truck's receiver to head down the road.
    You are dead-on correct. I could have done a much better job sketching this, but on the first picture, in the middle/far right of the napkin, you'll see what looks like a circle with a screw in the center. The head of whatever bolt we use will be tapped/welded onto a bearing plate with T-handle styled posts welded to the ends. The bearing plate, being pressure-fixed to the ground because of the weight, will allow the bolt to rotate. Knowing this may not work due to the force on the bearing plate and threaded bolt, we're going to weld a "just-in-case" nut at the lower base of the support bolt. This way, if it is too heavy and the force is too great to allow for us to turn it with our fingers, we can use a random set of vise-grips and slacken the load. The idea being that once the bike is loaded, we'll be able to "unscrew" the support bolt up and into the assembly for transport. If the parts prove too difficult to acquire, then we're going to scrap the concept and just go with a bottle-jack and a fabricate a good mounting base.

    Thank you by the way... You definately took a minute and thought it out.

  14. #14
    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jay1622 View Post
    Thank you by the way... You definately took a minute and thought it out.
    No problem -- I'm interested in how this turns out, as I also have an F-150 SCrew w/5.5' bed and an R12RT. Normally I'd just use my trailer, but a back-up plan using the F-150 bed would be nice to have.
    Mark Neblett
    Fairfax, VA
    #32806

  15. #15
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JStrube View Post
    Hey Kevin, I bought this for my toy hauler. I was wondering... It seems to pinch the front tire of my R1200RT, you know, collapses it where it Vees a bit. This is when I cinch the bike down. Yes, I am using the forks. Didn't know if this would damage tie tire or not.

    Other than that, it works fine. I am thinking of using the over the tire strap instead of a dual v strap tie down, any thoughts?

    Thanks,

    John.
    Correct -go with the "over-the-tire" strap!
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

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