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Thread: standing on footpegs crazy GS riders

  1. #1
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    standing on footpegs crazy GS riders

    Hi,

    As an RT owner and a GS adventure rider wanna-be, I have a question. Is riding while standing on the foot pegs safe or unsafe ? It seems as if it can be safer at times and unsafe at times. It it legal ? It seems on the interstate you could get charged with 'unsafe operation' for standing on foot-pegs.

    At the rally, I saw a whole bunch of crazy GS riders standing on their foot pegs. I had never noticed this before. So, it was a novelty. It made me smile. I don't know why, but it made me really happy to see the crazy GS riders standing on their foot-pegs. So, even though I ride a heavier RTP, I started standing on my foot pegs. It felt wonderful. Additionally, I noticed you can see further and better.

    While transitioning to and from my foot pegs, I do my best not to throw off the bike. For example, I would slowly rise and lower myself to seat. So, it seems safe.

    After trying this a few times, I found myself standing on the foot pegs all the time. If I was not in a corner, I would stand. Yesterday, I did a for at least 20-50 miles during my 800 mile ride. On the interstate, if someone was in the fast lane and driving slow, I would stand on my foot pegs. They would promptly move over, and I would sit and wave. When I was worried about deer, I stood on my foot pegs to better scan the tree line at dusk. When I entered intersections and came up hills, I stood on my foot pegs. When I wanted to see the landscape from the interstate, I stood on my foot pegs. When I was tired, I stood on my foot pegs. When on back roads in the rural areas, I stood on my foot pegs. I also stood for a mile or so down a straight rural gravel road in southern Illinois. Do any other riders do this or is this just supposed to be a GS thing ?
    Last edited by LuckyGrownup; 07-24-2012 at 01:59 PM. Reason: grammar fixes

  2. #2
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
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    Standing helps the bike move more freely under you, particularly on uneven or loose ground. It also helps to stretch during long highway miles. I remember watching the guys do this and had similar thoughts but I'm happy to report that it is rather easy!

    Don't just stand on the side lines, come out and join the GS Giants! One thing that continues to amaze me is that once you take that first step, there are plenty of great folks to encourage you and help you improve your skills. You just need to get over the fear of falling or damaging your bike. Dirty is purty and dings are something to be proud of! (of course, it's best if you have a GS too!)

  3. #3
    On a Ride
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    I stand on the GS and RT pegs on long trips. I'll do it to stretch the long limbs folded underneath. Plus it kinda airs things out down there. For me, it does much to add to the comfort. For sure, when off road, especially when the surface is on the bumpy side, I'll stand. When on pavement, and a standing stretch is called for, I'll wait for the right location... minimal to no traffic and typically a straight.

  4. #4
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    As they said, it's great for stretching and sometimes, at a prudent following distance, for getting the attention of someone that is driving slow in front of you.

    Where it is NOT good ,is where you might need to make a sudden hard brake application, such as entering an intersection or where deer might be lurking. You cannot make a "panic" stop while standing. The extra time involved to sit back down could be the difference between hitting and avoiding the problem.

    It's just another tool in the riding toolbox. Use it wisely!



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  5. #5
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
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    I find it easier to do slow speed maneuvers while standing which is why I often stood to scoot through the rally grounds.

  6. #6
    Registered User PittsDriver's Avatar
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    There are places where the LEOs will cite you for "stunting" for standing up to stretch your legs. I was warned about this after a long ride that ended up in north Georgia by a couple of locals that had been ticketed for stretching their legs. Silly, but something to think about before you stand up to relieve that pain in your knees.

  7. #7
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Standing makes perfect sense in loose material when conventional countersteering may cause the need for traction to exceed that which is available. The method is taught at off-road riding schools. But putting around the rally grounds standing on the pegs is more showmanship than necessity. A quick stretch maybe. Cruisin! Not needed.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  8. #8
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    But putting around the rally grounds standing on the pegs is more showmanship than necessity. .
    We had the same thought when we noticed a lot of the GS riders riding around the grounds standing up.
    Lee 2011 K1300S
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    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  9. #9
    Registered User David13's Avatar
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    I have seen the GS riders do it in various locations, such as jumping the curb at the dealership.
    But also it is an essential part of off roading, or dirt riding. I think for the curb at the dealer, it's showmanship, but off road, part of the ride.
    And stretching is necessary from time to time as well.
    dc

  10. #10
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    I met a fellow in the Yukon who always rode standing up. It was a rare moment indeed when he sat his rear on the seat. But the person who was truely getting the "bad end" of the deal was his girl friend sitting on the back seat... her view seldom changed. He seemed to be a decent rider but it seemed silly to me.

    I stand every now and then to stretch and get air to different places; normally when we are in a town and the speed has dropped, but not in traffic. I will also stand in loose stuff such as sand, mud or deep gravel when the bike wants to move around. Standing allows you to separate most of your body weight from the movements the bike is making. So instead of your weight enhancing a wobble it can be used to counter (countersteer) the movement of the bike. But I have not mastered shifting and braking while standing. When you see someone who has mastered control of a bike while standing; who can shift, brake and control the throttle and clutch, all while shifting their weight to control the bike at slow speed it is a beauty to behold.
    Kevin Huddy
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  11. #11
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by PittsDriver View Post
    There are places where the LEOs will cite you for "stunting" for standing up to stretch your legs. I was warned about this after a long ride that ended up in north Georgia by a couple of locals that had been ticketed for stretching their legs. Silly, but something to think about before you stand up to relieve that pain in your knees.
    Be careful doing this in Ontario. It could cost you $10,000 and confiscation of your bike and suspension of your license for a week.

    I keep my standup stretching to hovering my butt just above my bikes' seats when on our province's highways. The judge and jury is the OPP officer and there is no appeal. This falls under the province's street racing law.
    Paul
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  12. #12
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F View Post
    Be careful doing this in Ontario. It could cost you $10,000 and confiscation of your bike and suspension of your license for a week.

    I keep my standup stretching to hovering my butt just above my bikes' seats when on our province's highways. The judge and jury is the OPP officer and there is no appeal. This falls under the province's street racing law.
    BC has joined those ranks too. I get the motive behind the law; wanting to nail the idiots who want to stunt ride sitting on the tank or standing on the tail while doing wheelies out on the public roads. Sadly, it has the unfortunate effect of also restricting a legitimate riding technique. All the same, I'm not too worried about any cops out in the backroads where I do and will continue to stand up on the pegs a great deal.

    AKBeemer, keep practising the braking and shifting, it does get easier. I'm not highly proficient at it, but can do it well enough now. It also helps to have the levers set up at the proper height which is near to level with the top of the peg.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  13. #13
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    Back in the days of riding enduros, a lot of the riding was done on the pegs. It let you shift the center of gravity down and the action of you knees acted as shock-absorbers. At speed riding on the pegs let the bike move around quite a bit while the rider had better control.
    If you haven't seen On Any Sunday, you should. It's one of the best.



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  14. #14
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCMXCIVRS View Post
    BC has joined those ranks too. I get the motive behind the law; wanting to nail the idiots who want to stunt ride sitting on the tank or standing on the tail while doing wheelies out on the public roads. Sadly, it has the unfortunate effect of also restricting a legitimate riding technique. All the same, I'm not too worried about any cops out in the backroads where I do and will continue to stand up on the pegs a great deal.

    AKBeemer, keep practising the braking and shifting, it does get easier. I'm not highly proficient at it, but can do it well enough now. It also helps to have the levers set up at the proper height which is near to level with the top of the peg.
    REALLY? I must phone the cops and find out how the law actually reads. It WOULD make sense that if your butt is off the seat, your feet must be on the pegs and vice versa, but simply standing up is illegal? When I phone, I'll also ask if anyone in BC has been arrested since June 1 for wearing the "wrong" helmet.

    I'm starting to get the point of the helmet-wearing riders who vehemently oppose helmet laws. Maybe the slope is more slippery than I thought.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  15. #15
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    REALLY? I must phone the cops and find out how the law actually reads. It WOULD make sense that if your butt is off the seat, your feet must be on the pegs and vice versa, but simply standing up is illegal? When I phone, I'll also ask if anyone in BC has been arrested since June 1 for wearing the "wrong" helmet.

    I'm starting to get the point of the helmet-wearing riders who vehemently oppose helmet laws. Maybe the slope is more slippery than I thought.
    This is the section of the new BC law pertaining to remaining seated.

    194 (1) A person must not operate a motorcycle on a highway unless seated astride the driver's seat of the motorcycle.
    (2) A person, other than the operator, must not ride on a motorcycle on a highway unless
    (a) the motorcycle is designed and equipped to carry more than one person,
    (b) the other person rides
    (i) astride the permanent and regular seat if designed for 2 persons, behind the operator,
    (ii) astride another seat firmly attached to the motorcycle behind the seat occupied by the operator, or
    (iii) on or in another seat firmly attached to one side of the motorcycle, and
    (c) in the case of paragraph (b) (i) or (ii), the other person has both of his or her feet positioned on the foot pegs or floorboards of the motorcycle.
    How it reads is pretty clear and restricting. The real question for the cops would be how will it be enforced, and that may be subject to much variety I would imagine.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

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