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Thread: How Do YOU Deal With Tailgaters?

  1. #31
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    I can't forget the time when driving in heavy traffic on I-64 and a guy riding a yellow Ninja style bike was beside me in the left lane. He proceeded to stand up on the seat and posed on one foot going about 65 mph. I am not sure of his intentions, and I don't think the traffic behind him backed off much. I was really uncomfortable and saw myself giving statements and filing out written witness reports for the state police.
    Stan

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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDOCKERY132445 View Post
    There is NO way anyone can tailgate me on my motorcycle. I actually ride quickly enough to stay the hell out of the way of traffic.
    You'd get frustrated in my area, as it's the "land of no passing zones", i.e. all curvy roads . Also hard to imagine never getting trapped behind traffic?
    I like the hand out slow down /backoff tactic for starters.

  3. #33
    OldBMWMaster JDOCKERY132445's Avatar
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    Not me

    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    You'd get frustrated in my area, as it's the "land of no passing zones", i.e. all curvy roads . Also hard to imagine never getting trapped behind traffic?
    I like the hand out slow down /backoff tactic for starters.

    I pass when it is safe; not when some pencil pusher at DOT thinks the "average" vehicle can pass safely.

    If someone is tailgating me; I am too slow.
    Jerry Dockery
    309 N. 3rd. Ave.
    Kure Beach, NC 28449
    1996 R1100RT main bike & 1985 K100RS...too fast to believe.

  4. #34
    Registered User David13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDOCKERY132445 View Post

    If someone is tailgating me; I am too slow.

    Dockery, I don't know if you have been out on any roads lately, but your fantasies would never work on California roads.
    If you are at 90mph, within seconds you are going to see a huge pick up truck in your rear view, about 3 feet back.
    And in a few more seconds you are going to see several hundred cars in front of you, at 65 or 70 mph, or a whole lot less.
    Then the question is, with a tandem panic brake, who has better brakes, you, or the pick up.
    dc

  5. #35
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    As a daily commuter, tail-gaiting doesn't happen to me often . Maybe my protective gear, my safety vest , and my cool head help subdue other drivers. I do see aggressive drivers daily, but I move out of their way. Most aggressive drivers are huffing and buffing and only looking a few feet beyond their front bumper. There movements are rash and very hasty. They stick out like a sore thumb in traffic. When you position yourself in front of a good driver, you have a buffer.

    Additionally, when congestion gets high, drivers get impatient and angry. So, I take side streets when the main road is congested to avoid situations that stimulate aggressive driving. Also, drivers can see around bikes, so it may not be apparent to them they are tailgating. If they are really being aggressive, drivers are highly territorial. So, throwing rocks or ball bearings is not really going to help you.

    With that only 16% of motorcycle accidents are from behind. So, it is illogical to think being tailgated is going to put you in much danger. It is safer just to just slow down if in congestion. At slower speeds, you will have more space to stop/ or maneuverer. Also having more space will make my movements more predicable/smooth when being tailgated.

  6. #36
    American Mutt hexkopf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuckyGrownup View Post
    As a daily commuter, tail-gaiting doesn't happen to me often . Maybe my protective gear, my safety vest , and my cool head help subdue other drivers. I do see aggressive drivers daily, but I move out of their way. Most aggressive drivers are huffing and buffing and only looking a few feet beyond their front bumper. There movements are rash and very hasty. They stick out like a sore thumb in traffic. When you position yourself in front of a good driver, you have a buffer.

    Additionally, when congestion gets high, drivers get impatient and angry. So, I take side streets when the main road is congested to avoid situations that stimulate aggressive driving. Also, drivers can see around bikes, so it may not be apparent to them they are tailgating. If they are really being aggressive, drivers are highly territorial. So, throwing rocks or ball bearings is not really going to help you.

    With that only 16% of motorcycle accidents are from behind. So, it is illogical to think being tailgated is going to put you in much danger. It is safer just to just slow down if in congestion. At slower speeds, you will have more space to stop/ or maneuverer. Also having more space will make my movements more predicable/smooth when being tailgated.
    I am not sure where you are in MD. I commute up through the 83 corridor from PA to Baltimore. I agree, it doesn't happen much, but when it does I am always annoyed by it. I see so many rear end car accidents that it makes me worry a bit.
    Integrity is what you do when no one is looking.

    2008 R1200R Black

  7. #37
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    My biggest fear is getting hit again by a drunk or other non-attentive driver. Cell phone texter what ever.

    I got clipped in the right rear as a youngster on the freeway in the Detroit area by a drunk. He was entering the freeway and claimed he never saw me.

    Knocked me off and I flew over the cars in the left lane. Landed on my neck/back upside down , broke my back , and they never did find one of my engineer boots in the mess. ( way before ATGATT) The bike was totaled and i was a hurting puppy for a while.

    Living here in NAPCAR land the drivers have no respect for space or motorcycles.
    We call it tail gaiting they call it bump drafting.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hexkopf View Post
    I am not sure where you are in MD. I commute up through the 83 corridor from PA to Baltimore. I agree, it doesn't happen much, but when it does I am always annoyed by it. I see so many rear end car accidents that it makes me worry a bit.
    I used to commute on the Beltway, and tailgating was a non-stop event. Thanks to the ICC, I can bypass that horrific 8-lane death strip now. I'm convinced Maryland has the worst drivers in the country.

  9. #39
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    In reference to my earlier post, my tactic with ball bearings is only for the lonely open road jacka$$ encounter.

    Tailgaiters in traffic are easy enough to get rid of by many of the aforementioned techniques. I REALLY like the F-1 pit stop technique.

    I was accosted by some cretin in a pickup 30 years ago on a long, lonely stretch of highway in far southwest Texas near Big Bend and the ball bearing through his radiator did the trick. In my youthful ingorance, I thought I could just out run him and subsequently found out that a loaded 80" FLH will not outrun a pickup.

    He seemed to be having a rather large time messing with me...running up on me then backing off a bit only to repeat the whole cycle again and again for a number of miles. I was scared to death with no good place to pull oof the road and reacted accordingly. And I survived the encounter by stopping him in the literal middle of nowhere with a non functional truck. Spooky stuff when you realize you could die right here and right now.

    Situational awareness and always being aware of escape routes plays a huge role in the way I ride and deal with tailgaters.

    Escape when possible, and fight when you can't.

    Pretty simple, really.

  10. #40
    Registered User dadayama's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weasel View Post
    Once, on a hot summer day (90 degrees) commuting on I-75 in downtown Detroit, a yellow Corvette was right on my tail. I mean inches away, and traffic was doing about 70 mph. The road was rough from the winter and they hadn't filled in the potholes. I had a tupperware bowl of chicken soup that I'd pulled out of the fridge, earlier, and it was bungied to my rear seat. I hit a pothole, and the soup flew off and landed on his nice yellow hood. It splashed all over his windshield, and when he hit the wipers, that thick layer of fat at the top of the soup just smeared all over his windshield. I saw him pull over to what little bit of a left shoulder there was and I could hear the side of his car scraping on the jersey barrier. I feel bad that my soup spilled. If he was following at a safe distance, it would have just splashed on the road. I guess I feel bad for not stopping, but I was late for work and just rode on.
    So there is a God!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    Oklahoma Adventure Trail

  11. #41
    robert.bantly
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    Tailgating

    I have several - if there is traffic in front of me and no way to dodge - left hand down palm out (wonder if that is instinctive sign language). Do the mirror look, too. Avoid car gaggles per David Hough, and look for empty spots, but they never last long.

    Sadly, I live in Louisville, land of "slinky" traffic; a continually expanding and contracting spring of tailgaters. It is the worst city for tailgating and automotive road rage I have ever lived in and shouldn't be. Right now the freeways are bad due to bridge and ramp repairs but they usually aren't. I see a car-car road fight almost every day on the way to work. San Diego was safer with all of it's traffic!!! It is why a motorcycle commute for me is a rare thing and I used to do it every day in CA. I actually had someone ask me at the Georgia Mountain Rally why Louisville traffic is so Foxtrot Uniform and felt a little bad because of it.

    I've tried the brakelight flash and that one is iffy - sometimes if it's someone distracted then they'll back off. If it is a rager/aggressive driver, then you can end up with the car inches behind you or worse.

    With an aggressive driver, gassing it is akin to waving a red cape - a challenge to them, though I'll get out of the way if I can.

    People also seem to "hate" my sportbikes more than my GSA; that's probably due to the squid "stunta" high mph wheelies and traffic weaving that some less responsible riders engage in on them. Those guyz are doing uz a dizzervice!

  12. #42
    Delaware.Dave
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuckyGrownup View Post
    As a daily commuter, tail-gaiting doesn't happen to me often . Maybe my protective gear, my safety vest , and my cool head help subdue other drivers. I do see aggressive drivers daily, but I move out of their way. Most aggressive drivers are huffing and buffing and only looking a few feet beyond their front bumper. There movements are rash and very hasty. They stick out like a sore thumb in traffic. When you position yourself in front of a good driver, you have a buffer.

    Additionally, when congestion gets high, drivers get impatient and angry. So, I take side streets when the main road is congested to avoid situations that stimulate aggressive driving. Also, drivers can see around bikes, so it may not be apparent to them they are tailgating. If they are really being aggressive, drivers are highly territorial. So, throwing rocks or ball bearings is not really going to help you.

    With that only 16% of motorcycle accidents are from behind. So, it is illogical to think being tailgated is going to put you in much danger. It is safer just to just slow down if in congestion. At slower speeds, you will have more space to stop/ or maneuverer. Also having more space will make my movements more predicable/smooth when being tailgated.
    I must live on the wrong side of the Chesapeake Bay. My normal commute is Delaware Route 1 from Middletown to Wilmington, about 60 mile round trip. The drivers in the morning are inattentive while the afternoon drivers are just plain aggressive. Hard to say which is more dangerous.

    The tailgaters usually run about a half-second behind me. If I tap my brake light, they often get the hint, but not always. People will cut me off by a matter of feet off my front wheel. I have to be very aware of spacing and lane position at all times.

    If it comes down to it though, a motorcycle will never win a battle against a car. The only thing you can do is sidestep the problem and let them by. I'd rather witness an accident ahead of me than to be involved in one.

  13. #43
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    I used to do the "tap the brake" routine, but found that the tailgaters get furious.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  14. #44
    R1200RT Artiee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saddleman View Post
    I whip out my camera & take a picture of the them in my mirror. This picture is of a semi truck that was tailgating me on a hwy. in central FL. I had rode from Charlotte NC to a RTE in Lake Wales FL. and came up on a group of (20 or so) SLOW riding Gold Wings. He backed way off after I took the picture. I also turn the camera around & point it at them. Works every time
    On the occasions I've mounted my GoPro on my top case, facing rearward, the cars behind me tend to keep their distance.
    Experience IS NOT the best teacher! Someone else's experience is the best teacher.

  15. #45
    American Mutt hexkopf's Avatar
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    Integrity is what you do when no one is looking.

    2008 R1200R Black

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