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Thread: High Speed Obstacle Avoidance

  1. #16
    American Mutt hexkopf's Avatar
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    That's the luckiest bastard in the world. I am guessing that is about the best way for that to end if you DO make contact. Yikes man. Thanks for posting that....
    Integrity is what you do when no one is looking.

    2008 R1200R Black

  2. #17
    Registered User David13's Avatar
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    That's an old one. Seen it many times before. As to luck, yes and no. It did knock him onto the wrong side of the road. Fortunately that did not put him into a head-on situation.
    dc

  3. #18
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDOCKERY132445 View Post
    What I do, when riding in deer country, especially at night,
    I live in deer country, the Southern Tier of New York.

    I don't ride at night.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  4. #19
    neanderssance man sedanman's Avatar
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    I'll add that a horn blast will generally make a lurking deer head right back for the woods. I ride through a stretch where I have sometimes seen as many as seven deer grazing right on the shoulder. In one year I hit 2 that gave me no time to react. (in the cage) .As an experiment I used my horn on theis section of road (no houses) beeping it every five or ten seconds. I didn't see a single deer that day and had seen many the day before and after.
    Paul
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    2011 R1200RT

  5. #20
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    Hexkopf, guess you get the point that there is no real answer, just things you can do to reduce the odds of a deer strike and the damage it will do. Here are my thoughts:
    1. Swerving practice is great for getting around unexpected STATIONARY objects (pothole, rock, etc.) Swerving is definitely second to braking when it comes to cars invading your turf. It is probably BAD PRACTICE to think of swerving around an animal which can move quickly. Remember, you have to separate swerving from braking or you will quickly be on the pavement anyway. For the animal you see on the road, I think "brake hard and aim for the butt" is good advice. And maybe when that maneuver is successful it will remind you that you're riding faster than you should for your sight distance.
    2. In an area where deer are common, DON'T RIDE AT NIGHT. If you drive your car at night in a "high impact area," slow down to 50-55 and use the cruise control. Even if you are alert, this may not prevent a collision with a "leaps out in front of you" deer, but likely only the car (not you) will suffer serious damage. As you said, not so true at 70 mph.
    3. MANY entertaining two lane roads (far enough from towns so the danger of speed enforcement is low) also feature trees and brush close to the road to hide deer. It is up to you to balance the risks and pleasures of a brisk ride. At dawn or dusk or if I saw a deer or three, I dial it down.
    4. I'm not a fan of the "follow a large vehicle closely" school of thought. It blocks your view of what may be on the road that you need to miss - which is not just deer - and also your view of the shoulders. Could also be that when the dually in front of you sees a deer darting in front of him, his ABS will outperform yours on the bike and you will hit him.
    5. When you see a deer peacefully munching something on the side of the road, SLOW DOWN IMMEDIATELY. Most likely it continue to do what it was doing. But if it suddenly decides the brousing is greater on the other side of the road, you are in control.

    I think for the most skilled street riders (no, that doesn't describe me) deer are actually the greatest threat. They are more numerous than ever, totally stupid about the danger from vehicles, often hard to see, and much harder to predict than the worst drivers.

    These are the ways I see to REDUCE the odds of a deer strike, and if you have one, reduce the damage. (Did I fail to mention ATGATT?)
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  6. #21
    American Mutt hexkopf's Avatar
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    All great advice guys/gals, so thanks for that. I used to deer hunt so I can understand the unpredictability of the animal. I guess the one thing you can rely on is that you cannot predict or guess with any degree of certainty what a deer or other wild animal will do at any given time.

    The great thing about a forum like this with the experience the members bring to the table is that aside from chiding each other and talking about farkles, you might actually share some knowledge that could save a life or two, and that is pretty cool.
    Integrity is what you do when no one is looking.

    2008 R1200R Black

  7. #22
    Registered User tourunigo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sedanman View Post
    I'll add that a horn blast will generally make a lurking deer head right back for the woods. I ride through a stretch where I have sometimes seen as many as seven deer grazing right on the shoulder. In one year I hit 2 that gave me no time to react. (in the cage) .As an experiment I used my horn on theis section of road (no houses) beeping it every five or ten seconds. I didn't see a single deer that day and had seen many the day before and after.
    While I try and be as vigilant as possible (riding two up helps with the observation aspect) while mentally imagining situations that I might have some control over, I also resign myself to a bit of 'luck of the draw' attitude. Fast or slow, synchronicity is out there.

    Anyway, about those horns: "a few years ago I was riding my /5 through upstate Wisc. at about midnight (...that's another story) when I notice a few really small deer nibbling along the side of the road. Ok, proceed cautiously eh. But what the hell, maybe if I give a little blast with the air horns they might retreat. Nada. Like grasshoppers in heat dozens started flipping back and forth for a few seconds. Now at a full stop, the only sound was the ticking motor and a heart beating the hell out of the inside of my jacket. I'm not convinced that loud horns save lives. Maybe it just give ya hope and you feel a bit more secure/confident. - Bob
    saltyfogriders@gmail.com
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  8. #23
    Registered User tourunigo's Avatar
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    another quick thought: I have a difficult time recognizing a deer and a friend of mine, an avid hunter and trapper, can pick one out immediately. Could some practice in Deer Recognition be helpful in a motorcycle safety course and/or some other delivery venue? - Bob
    saltyfogriders@gmail.com
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  9. #24
    rsbeemer 22600's Avatar
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    Some things I do and don't do

    I live in Texas Hill Country with a large population of deer. Here are a few things I do to avoid them on the road or to protect myself.

    1. I plan my rides so that I do not ride a night. If I am caught out a night I slow down, way down and watch closely. They do run across the road in the daytime but are much easier to see.

    2. When I do see a deer cross in front of me, I slow down and look for his friends that I know are close behind. He does have friends either in front or the rear.

    3. I wear all the protective clothing available in case I do go down.

    4. If I do see deer ahead and have time, I slow down and honk my horn to let them know I coming.

    Most of you know a deer is predictable, that is, to be unpredictable. I have never hit a deer but I have been hit by a deer twice; they probably have these same conversations about us.

    Riding a bike is just another chance we take in order to do what we like. Taking a few precautions will help but still it just a chance we take.

    When I was younger, I remember riding 70 to 80mph at night and seeing deer grazing right beside the road. It always scared me but it didn't slow me down. Only old age and maybe being a little smarter has kept me upright.
    1978 R100rs MOA#22600 125cc Kymco
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.

  10. #25
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Awareness before avoidance is required.

    An interesting discussion of skills and their applications but what I find lacking is, with the possible exception of one post, is a discussion of remaining aware to limit the occasions requiring avoidance skills.

    When does night begin? Many of you point out that you avoid riding at night. Yet dusk when cars may still not have their headlights on and you feel safe riding in 'daylight' is when many of the deer are moving on their morning commute. You need to be aware of your surroundings at all times.

    The danger of night riding or driving is tunnel vision. Riding at night requires more awareness of your surroundings than daytime in my book. Am I riding through woods, near water, open area, straight road or in the turns? Do I have any historical experience riding in the area? What did I learn? What do I need to be looking out for? If I have no experience in the area do I need to increase my caution; ie. Decrease speed etc.

    I commute by bike in the Twin Cities and the first ring of suburbs. My daily commute often has me ridding one leg dawn/dusk or in the dark. I see deer, racoons, coyotes, eagles, and all sorts of other critters on the streets and roads I ride almost every ride. From my MSF training I have learned to practice my avoidance skills to keep them fresh. From my years of sport riding I have learned the best way to not need them is awareness of my surroundings and riding with in my limits based on that awareness.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

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