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Thread: 15W-50 instead of 10W-40?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    requesting an oil sample, and having a UV additive added at the factory are still quite a ways off from a "viscosity checker" (if such a thing even exists at the repair shop level of operation).
    i'm still awaiting some kind of factual confirmation before i take that original "viscosity checker- believe it" statement off of the BS pile.
    I would assume in the case in question, the factory had a oil test including viscosity correctly performed. Had something been amiss, they would have denied warranty. I doubt if a simple viscosity check would hold up in court. In the case I know of, about 2 days later they approved warranty work.

  2. #32
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBeemer View Post
    I'm pretty sure that all bikes produced after 1500 hours, Central European Time on June 12, 2008 have a SAT based transponder onboard that will transmit the weight of oil you are using directly to the OPS Zenter at the mother company's HQ in Stugart. If you use the improper oil they will send a Telex informing you that your warranty "ist kaput". The system also detects oil levels that fall .001 microns below dead-center in the window, tires that are more than .25 PSI over or under the BMW directed pressures and the condition of your final drive. This later function allows BMW Zentral to send you a letter denying your warranty claim for the FD and blaming the failure on your use of poor fuel and improper braking techniques. It is not uncommon for these letters to reach an owner before he/she is even aware of a FD issue. Believe that!!!
    How did I miss this, oh yea, I was in the French Alps riding, not worrying about oil.

    But that said, I cant pass up the opportunity the facts above open up for me. I am starting a new venture. For the mere price of $19.95 plus S&H I want to offer a kit that essentially blocks these transmissions, thus assuring you that big BrotherMW, will never know that you prefer running grandma's castor oil in the motor and final drive.

    Grandma always said castor oil was the best stuff you could use to smooth out your exhaust from your final drive areas, and she lived past 100!

    The kit contains everything you see below, with detailed installation instructions.

    2010 F800GS Full Ohlins package, '04 R1100S Replika
    '01 F650GS Wife's bike
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    Tuscany and Central Italy 2010

  3. #33
    Dave Nicholls 105258's Avatar
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    Oil Supplier

    You are not required to use BMW oil, omly oil that meets the correst viscosity and grades. There are many good quality oils that do this for less money.
    Dave Nicholls
    Teulon Manitoba - Canada

    2010 1200RT

  4. #34
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    The oil chart in my owner's manual for my '11 RT shows a couple of different weights recommended for what I feel is within some small variations in temperature. So, I go into my dealer and only said to the parts conter person- "I need BMW oil for my 2011 RT" to see what he would recommend. He opened the page on the computer screen and said: "WHOA! They sure have a few choices- like 5! What do you want to use?"

    So much for expert advice or a definitive answer.

    Bottom line is oil is good, no oil is no good.

  5. #35
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    Yes, but.....

  6. #36
    Registered User David13's Avatar
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    I don't think it really matters much. At least, for certain, in the short run.
    I just put the 15w 50 in my RT today. It's now sold under the Spectra name.
    dc

  7. #37
    Registered User chewbacca's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 85K100LT View Post
    Ask the BMW dealer-

    You will Void your Warranty!!!


    All dealers have a viscosity checker if you use the incorrect weight oil they will know right away.

    Believe it!!!

    It's your bike you need to do what is best should not hurt the engine.
    You REALY believe that ???? Do you think the dealers are the Warranty Police??? This may sound crazy but there is a helluva lot more to that 15w50 or 10w40 rating than flow rate (viscosity). Right out of the can, this wondrous dealer viscosity meter very well may not measure what the viscosity rating on the can says. It's way more complicated than that. Then comes the point that BMW has to prove that such a minor difference in oil actually was the cause of the damage. In the USA you can't do a blanket revoking of warranty for just anything the dealer feels like. Last but not least, those are recommendations not Commandments.
    Old But Not Dead
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  8. #38
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    Castrol power RS racing 4t
    10-50 meets JASO MA2 API SL
    Buy the case from motorcycle superstores

  9. #39
    Registered User Brian-NC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommcgee View Post
    Every vehicle owners manual I've ever looked at has an oil weight vs. temperature chart.
    Then that tells me you have never seen a 2013 BMW GTL's owners manual...almost completely void of useful information
    Brian-NC
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    Current bike
    2010 RT Ostra Grey

  10. #40
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    How did I miss this, oh yea, I was in the French Alps riding, not worrying about oil.

    But that said, I cant pass up the opportunity the facts above open up for me. I am starting a new venture. For the mere price of $19.95 plus S&H I want to offer a kit that essentially blocks these transmissions, thus assuring you that big BrotherMW, will never know that you prefer running grandma's castor oil in the motor and final drive.

    Grandma always said castor oil was the best stuff you could use to smooth out your exhaust from your final drive areas, and she lived past 100!

    The kit contains everything you see below, with detailed installation instructions.

    Do you have room for investors? This looks like a great place to park the Nigerian money I should receive any day.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by NI5L View Post
    I gotta call BS on that one. 25 years in car dealership shops and I've never even heard mention of a viscosity checker, let alone used one.
    Ahhh...ya...agreed sounds like bs.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadkill601 View Post
    Ahhh...ya...agreed sounds like bs.
    I have been running rotella t non synthetic 15w40


    Seems ok....also check out the great article in the (April I think) moa mag....

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by NI5L View Post
    I gotta call BS on that one. 25 years in car dealership shops and I've never even heard mention of a viscosity checker, let alone used one.
    You have never heard of a viscosity checker?

  14. #44
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NI5L View Post
    I gotta call BS on that one. 25 years in car dealership shops and I've never even heard mention of a viscosity checker, let alone used one.
    Oil test labs do this type of thing. Here's a discussion of a "viscosity checker":

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscometer

    It's basically how much fluid flows through an orifice in a given period of time at a specific temperature. I wouldn't think it's a house-hold item, though!
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  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Oil test labs do this type of thing. Here's a discussion of a "viscosity checker":

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscometer

    It's basically how much fluid flows through an orifice in a given period of time at a specific temperature. I wouldn't think it's a house-hold item, though!
    I'm almost positive I saw a tech doing the "Falling Sphere Viscometers" test just a week or so ago. And this was when the bike was sitting on top of a Harbor Freight lift no less!! And, this was all performed during a 600 mile service at the request of the OEM!


    Falling sphere viscometers


    Creeping flow past a sphere.
    Stokes' law is the basis of the falling sphere viscometer, in which the fluid is stationary in a vertical glass tube. A sphere of known size and density is allowed to descend through the liquid. If correctly selected, it reaches terminal velocity, which can be measured by the time it takes to pass two marks on the tube. Electronic sensing can be used for opaque fluids. Knowing the terminal velocity, the size and density of the sphere, and the density of the liquid, Stokes' law can be used to calculate the viscosity of the fluid. A series of steel ball bearings of different diameter are normally used in the classic experiment to improve the accuracy of the calculation. The school experiment uses glycerine as the fluid, and the technique is used industrially to check the viscosity of fluids used in processes. It includes many different oils, and polymer liquids such as solutions.
    In 1851, George Gabriel Stokes derived an expression for the frictional force (also called drag force) exerted on spherical objects with very small Reynolds numbers (e.g., very small particles) in a continuous viscous fluid by changing the small fluid-mass limit of the generally unsolvable Navier-Stokes equations:

    where:
    is the frictional force,
    is the radius of the spherical object,
    is the fluid viscosity, and
    is the particle's velocity.
    If the particles are falling in the viscous fluid by their own weight, then a terminal velocity, also known as the settling velocity, is reached when this frictional force combined with the buoyant force exactly balance the gravitational force. The resulting settling velocity (or terminal velocity) is given by:

    where:
    Vs is the particles' settling velocity (m/s) (vertically downwards if , upwards if ),
    is the Stokes radius of the particle (m),
    g is the gravitational acceleration (m/s2),
    ρp is the density of the particles (kg/m3),
    ρf is the density of the fluid (kg/m3), and
    is the (dynamic) fluid viscosity (Pa s).
    Note that Stokes flow is assumed, so the Reynolds number must be small.
    A limiting factor on the validity of this result is the roughness of the sphere being used.
    A modification of the straight falling sphere viscometer is a rolling ball viscometer which times a ball rolling down a slope whilst immersed in the test fluid. This can be further improved by using a patented V plate which increases the number of rotations to distance traveled, allowing smaller more portable devices. This type of device is also suitable for ship board use. Currently, new equipment is developed for viscosity measurements. This equipment is survismeter and not only measures viscosity only but along with viscosity, it also measures surface tension, interfacial tension, wetting coefficient with high accuracy and precision. The survismeter also measures a new parameter which is noted as friccohesity. The friccohesity establishes an interface between the cohesive forces and the frictional forces within the similar or dissimilar molecules, dispersed in desired medium.Friccohesity is intimately associated with distribution of the particles due to oscillations of the velocity components on gaining kinetic energy. Since friccohesity depicts demonstration of cohesive or potential forces and kinetic or frictional forces together and thus the particle distribution is automatically involved in the behavior of the mixtures. It is similar to melting of the ice or the solid state materials in parts because the particles which gain kinetic energy start moving in x,y,z directions with definite pressure and thus the less is the cohesive force more is the pressure exerted by the kinetically moving molecules which strike the walls. But when the molecules move on the fixed track that is noted under the capillary phenomenon within the rigid wall example is Schr?dinger equation within the solid wall. Thus, the particles distribution occurs in 2 D and in such cases the friccohesity is called restricted friccohesity within boundaries.

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