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Thread: Plugs anti-seize or not

  1. #1
    Arctic Art
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    Cool Plugs anti-seize or not

    I just love it when 2 gurus differ,one says never and the other says always use anti-seize on plugs w/reduced torque.I intend to us it anyway. Any thoughts. Gurus yea,yea!!!

  2. #2
    Registered User toooldtocare's Avatar
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    I always use it, and tighten them enough to crush the washer.

  3. #3
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Gurus--what a joke.

    The folks that make spark plugs and the folks that make engines say no antiseize.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  4. #4
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    I've never had any issues with plugs sticking in cylinder threads as long as they were properly installed to begin with. Maybe I've just been lucky? No antiseize for me on sparkplugs, though I ALWAYS use it on the exhaust port threads.
    BMWs in my garage: 1982 R65LS, 1978 R100/7

  5. #5
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    In 45 years of doing my own vehicle maint, I've never used the stuff.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  6. #6
    Registered User miairhead's Avatar
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    I trust Oak

    Oak says NEVER use on plugs. Tom Cutter I think advise against it too.
    Tom
    '84 R100RT '04 CLC(gone) Honda NT700V
    BMW
    Beer Motorcycles Women

  7. #7
    Superkraut typ181r90's Avatar
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    Well, in the BMW manual it says to use graphite grease. Personally I apply a very light coat when changing plugs, but that's about it
    // 1975 BMW R90/6 (cafe'd) // 1957 BMW R60 (in pieces) // 1967 Aermacchi/H-D Sprint 250 SS (custom special) // 1973 VW Type 181 Custom SOLD )

    http://symphonyofshrapnel.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Registered User toooldtocare's Avatar
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    Some reading for your consideration.

    http://mechanicsupport.blogspot.com/...nti-seize.html
    http://www.avweb.com/news/maint/spar..._198595-1.html
    http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalo.../antiseize.php

    That said, the newer plugs seem to be coated with a material that makes it no longer needed.

    http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/TB-...1antisieze.pdf

    I may stop using it since I now use NGK plugs in my bike.

  9. #9
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    I look at anti-seize similar to peanut-butter - perhaps because of the similar consistency. Some places really need it, but it probably wont hurt putting a thin coat on most any metal threads. Granted, it is messy and unnecessary but generally won't damage the threads or cause other problems - unless it is used around brakes or other grease-free areas. Some uses, like aluminum to aluminum threads on the exhaust nuts require anti-seize.

    Some industries (i.e. nuclear) put anti-seize on nearly all fasteners, but it is really needed on materials which tend to gall in contact such as stainless and aluminum. I have used anti-seize on spark plug threads a few times: it is messy and has no benefit but has never caused any problems.
    Stan

    AH# 13238

  10. #10
    DoktorT
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    In servicing Euro alloy heads for many years, the problems I have seen always have to do with, "if some is good, more is better and too much is just enough". It turns into bubble gum consistancy and has to be removed with a thread chaser. If you can't just loosen the plug and turn it out with fingers, it's a problem.

    I use just two drops of light machine oil. No worries.

  11. #11
    JoeDabbs
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    Some is good, more is better, too much is just about right - Jerry Lee Lewis
    Joe Dabbs
    2011 RT
    1975 R60/6

  12. #12
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Understanding is everything. A little smear of anti-seize in and of itself does no harm. But it reduces the measured tightening torque by from 25% to maybe 40% because the friction component of the torque resistance is reduced. What the wrench senses is a combination of friction and clamping force. So if anti-seize has been used and a person sets a torque wrench to the specified torque the resulting clamping force may exceed the thread strength and the threads will strip.

    If anti-seize has previously been used some remains. Then if new plugs are installed by a person who doesn't know it was there - the threads may strip. That is the downside.

    On low miles-per-year bikes if the plugs remain undisturbed for several years, or if the engine overheats even a little the plugs may stick in place and the threads may tear upon removal of the plugs. Anti-seize will prevent this. That is the upside.

    So you get to take your pick of which risk you are willing to take.
    Last edited by PGlaves; 06-20-2012 at 07:23 PM.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  13. #13
    John. jstrube's Avatar
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    Paul,

    Are plugs a torqued install on Airheads? I know on most automotive installations, they are a turned value, like 1/16 rotation or such depending on the seat type.

    When building a few auto engines, most torqued fasteners have values given using either a moly paste (ARP fasteners, ARP paste), or engine oil, with different values for the same fastener depending on which is used. I know on my Hexhead, the wheels are a dry install, with torque based on that.

    I like a small shmear of anti-sieze on my plugs, I've had plugs pull threads out of aluminum before, when not using it, so I do now.
    John.

  14. #14
    Sir Darby Darryl Cainey's Avatar
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    44 years of riding motorcycles
    445,000 miles on my 1977 R100RS in 26 years
    I always use a dab of anit-seize on my plugs

    I Have never stripped a plug
    I have never used a torque wrench on plugs

    Common sence has to be used when installing plugs!
    Ambassador BMW MOA Ontario Canada
    President Niagara BMW Riders #298
    Knights of the Roundel #333
    1977 R100RS, (Retired) 1993 R100GS (just getting started)

  15. #15
    Bill Clark Air Race Addict's Avatar
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    I'm with you on this one. I work in Aviation and we use a small dab of anti-seize on all ignitors/spark plugs. Never stripped a plug hole. Ever. Just sayin. We do torque the ignitors, but that is taken into account by the manufacturer. I don't torque my spark plugs on my 78 R100RS. Had it since 86. Once again, it works for me so it's in the world of opinions and experience.
    Quote Originally Posted by DARRYL CAINEY View Post
    44 years of riding motorcycles
    445,000 miles on my 1977 R100RS in 26 years
    I always use a dab of anit-seize on my plugs

    I Have never stripped a plug
    I have never used a torque wrench on plugs

    Common sence has to be used when installing plugs!

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