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Thread: Stoves, my stuff!

  1. #16
    Dum vivimus vivamus ted's Avatar
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    The MSR Pocket Rocket is on sale for $30 - incredible deal!
    http://www.rei.com/product/660163/ms...kpacking-stove
    Ted
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    1994 K75RT
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  2. #17
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Really good point;

    Well taken. The packer meals are high energy based foods and you need to slightly more active than the average BMW rider! I had not given it much thought, but Ted's right on about that. Costco's selling the Mountain Home foods now in a 10 pack for around 45$. A bargain, as the individual packs are serving for 2. 4.50 each comes in quite less than you know? They go around 6$+ where I live. Wife and I made two meals recently off one burner, one pot and it came out really good. Salad and cooked chicken/apple bits we chopped ourselves and hamburger(s) on pita bread/salad. One burner cook books exist too. I have one somewhere, just cannot recall the title this minute. Randy

  3. #18
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    Currently using a Soto OD-1R. About same size as the little MSR, perhaps a tiny bit smaller, but has a built in igniter that works.
    I mostly cook fresh one pot stuff and carry a small cook set that includes a small fry pan capability. Have done everything from eggs to steaks to stews with no problems- the heat is a bit concentrated but the modulation is good and it works OK with non-stick stuff at least for me. I carry a combo French press/cup for morning coffee and the small sterilized half and half plastic containers for cream because they need no refrigeration. When I need to keep stuff cold I use a polarpac (?) ice bag- seems pretty good for its size.

    Need to work out how to integrate my Veskimo acquired last year into the mix. Its about the time of year to start using it and of course it has insulated ice storage as part of its design. Could perhaps store food in it when not riding, buying toward the end of the day??

    Always liked gasoline fired stuff when I rode carbed bikes but don't want to carry liquid fuels. A gas canister for the Soto last me for at least 2 rallies or about 6 days...The way I track partials is that I have weighed both new and empty containers using a gram scale I use for brewing. I just tare out the container and weigh the remaining gas after a trip and write it on the container with a magic marker. Easy to tell exactly what is leftand from experience I know how much use that will allow.

  4. 07-01-2012, 04:48 PM

  5. #19
    Registered User amiles's Avatar
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    I can't seem to find the mountain home or mountain house products at Costco. Perhaps It has been a while & they discontinued them??



    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    Costco's selling the Mountain Home foods now in a 10 pack for around 45$. A bargain, as the individual packs are serving for 2. 4.50 each comes in quite less than you know? They go around 6$+ where I live. Randy

  6. #20
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Costco West;

    Maybe its only the Costco's out here, but they just got it in, so its a new item for them. I work for Costco frequently(Vendor) and know it just hit the shelves out here. Its a variety pack(10) of 2 serving packets at 44$. Nice, but not sure which meals are in the box. It may be labeled on the box. I know some of'em are not my favorite... Randy

  7. #21
    Registered User Olsensan's Avatar
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    I've also cooked with the chem heaters for mre's. They cook flameless and given the problems with fires and a ban on open fires in the western states, these are the way to go. The mre's produced/distributed by reputable companies are actually pretty darn good. You can heat water in these pouches too so coffee and tea are still possible.

  8. #22
    Registered User KALTZG's Avatar
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    Trangia

    After trying an array of cooking arrangments, my final choice is the Trangia 27. Can brew a pot of coffee/tea or a three course meal for two.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp1Yw...&feature=g-upl
    Gail Kaltz
    1997 GS

  9. 07-18-2012, 12:42 PM

  10. #23
    Rally Rat empeg9000's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaltzg View Post
    After trying an array of cooking arrangments, my final choice is the Trangia 27. Can brew a pot of coffee/tea or a three course meal for two.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp1Yw...&feature=g-upl
    THis is an old thread but I've been wanting one of these for a while. I have a jet boil now and I like it but I mostly use it for coffee.

  11. 11-03-2012, 08:46 AM

  12. #24
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Whats the toes?

    Egg's, a tough product to carry, Ive found over the years. I raise chickens too, a family flock of only 15 or so birds, but have never been able to figure out how to carry eggs on a bike without breaking them. Tried too! Scrambled in a box(liquid) eggs are not my thing, so IF I could carry the real thing, I would. I guess one could BUY eggs from a fellow RVer in a campground, as needed. Otherwise, no fresh eggs. Fresh eggs will last days from the chicken, never fridge'd, but once fridgerated, too late to carry unless you keep them cold.
    Sometimes, older cooking stuff is the greatest and those toasters have been around forever, as well as many other items. Some of this NEW stuff coming about nowadays is amazingly neat too! I saw a new very basic pellet stove at Dick's Sporting Goods the other day and its really BASIC. Like the old stytle fold up Sterno Stoves, similar, but with better burning pellets now. Each one burning two hours and reusable, until burned out completely. Very tidy package and clean to use, like gas cannisters are, but even simpler yet. My Jet Boil is my latest stove, with a few years use now and its a blast furnace of heat. I keep stove shopping, however, as a camper stuff junkie. Randy

  13. #25
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    Egg's, a tough product to carry, Ive found over the years. I raise chickens too, a family flock of only 15 or so birds, but have never been able to figure out how to carry eggs on a bike without breaking them. Tried too! Scrambled in a box(liquid) eggs are not my thing, so IF I could carry the real thing, I would.
    I crack a couple three eggs open into a small lock-n-lock container and place the sealed container in the bottom of my ice chest. That's good for two or three days. I've not had the eggs self-scramble, even when on some very rough and rocky dirt roads. Not that self-scrambling would be all that much of an issue for me... I often use the eggs to make french toast.

  14. #26
    MearthA rdalland's Avatar
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    Here's my Jetboil in action



    I have a nice big cooler now too

    ride what you've got; enjoy the road you're on!

    Reid - Stone Ridge, NY - MOA #69187 - Turbo Fluffy Motoclub - IBA #50182

  15. #27
    Raspberry waffles Bob!!! kewlmoose's Avatar
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    I've got a coleman exponent, uses white gas or unleaded in a pinch. It's a one piece stove that's easy to transport & use.
    82 R65LS - gone but not forgotten
    02 R1150RT
    "Oh good, my dog found the chainsaw"
    "I finally got my head together, now my body is falling apart."

  16. #28
    Marine By Choice #188306
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    Old fashioned way

    Quote Originally Posted by kewlmoose View Post
    I've got a coleman exponent, uses white gas or unleaded in a pinch. It's a one piece stove that's easy to transport & use.
    I used these during three tours in Vietnam and they ALWAYS work. While not "modern" they take up little space, are cheap and do what is needed. Almost any military surplus store has them.

    U.S. G.I. Trioxane Fuel Tabs, 250 boxes of 3 (750 tabs)
    Just put a match to this compressed trioxane tab and youÔÇÖll have instant fire. Used by our troops to heat their rations. Each box contains 3 tabs in individual waterproof wrappers ...

    I take a small pot and a small skillet. Very basic, but functional.

  17. #29
    MOUNTAIN RIDER
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    I am a 21 LBS or less backpacker and I do like my Jetboil over my MSR Whisperlite as it is compact and cooks food real fast. Dehydrate some tomatoes blend them up with some herbs and salt in a coffee grinder pack in zip-lock bag, add water intent spag sauce.

  18. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaltzg View Post
    After trying an array of cooking arrangments, my final choice is the Trangia 27. Can brew a pot of coffee/tea or a three course meal for two.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp1Yw...&feature=g-upl
    I also found it difficult to get dimensions and weights for the Trangia products. I have had my Trangia 27 for a while now, took it camping plenty of times and used it hiking on the Appalachian trail. I did not get the tea pot but instead the 2.5 liter aluminum pot with bail. The pot was (relatively) expensive but is nice to have. The pot is 8" in diameter with an overall height of 5" (with lid) and the Trangia 27 kit in the orange bag fits inside with a total weight of 3.1 lbs. It is a well thought-out piece of kit and with some practice can be used to cook anything - but used most to boil water. It came in handy after hurricane Irene last year.
    Last edited by Stan_R80/7; 11-12-2012 at 02:01 AM. Reason: corrected pot size
    Stan

    AH# 13238

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