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Thread: insulate the kickstand

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  1. #1
    Registered User f14rio's Avatar
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    insulate the kickstand

    a nice harley fella i know says he puts a piece of rubber on his garage floor and sets his bike's kick stand on it. he says direct contact with the concrete isn't a good idea. (current flow/battery discharge).

    anybody here heard that?

    fwiw, i have heard that you shouldn't store car batteries on a concrete floor. they should be stored on pieces of 2x4's
    "Enemy fighters at 2 o'clock!...Roger, What should i do until then?"

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  2. #2
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
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    Some Harley riders will believe anything. Nothing to it.

    The car battery thing was true at one time. However, the battery cases are now made out of plastic so it is not longer an issue. I have the original battery I took out of my 2001 Escape sitting on the floor on a battery tender. It is still fine and I use it when I need to run a sprayer, jump start something and similar reasons. The only reason I changed it was to shut up the lady who drives it. She didn't want to be stuck somewhere when the battery died.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  3. #3
    Registered User xp8103's Avatar
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    Well... He WAS talking about someone who owns a HARLEY and I'm sure the fellow was looking for something to blame his current draw that was leaving his battery dead on.....
    Nik #140220 - '88 K75C | '96 R1100RS | '77 R100RS | '06 DL650
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  4. #4
    Lucky motorradmike's Avatar
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    HD has a habit of designing old technology into their bikes.
    I'd check the battery case to see if it's made of leather before storing it on a concrete floor.
    Side stand on a floor though???
    Mike Marr
    1978 Yamaha XS750 (Needs rings), 1996 BMW R1100RS, 2004 Honda CRF230F

  5. #5
    Mind is not for rent
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    Actually, depending on the concrete, it's not a bad idea to park on a rubber mat. Unless you've got a vapor barrier under your slab, moisture can come up through it and rust your bike. It can be a real problem if you ride during the winter and have road salt stuck to it.

    Throw a clear piece of plastic under your bike and leave it there for a day or two. If you end up with condensation under it, you might want to consider parking on something impermeable.



    Sorry to piss on the Harley bashing, carry on.......

  6. #6
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Wouldn't the battery already be in a tray with rubber mounts? Seems like the kickstand insulator is moot.
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  7. #7
    Nickname: Droid
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    Ha, that's a new one. I agree that 40 years ago it might have applied, but no more. If that were the case then I would have gone through over 10 batteries in my 18 years and 164k miles with the same bike. So far, I'm on battery number four, for an average of one battery per 41,000 miles. That number would be far better if that expensive Westco battery had not suddenly died after less than two seasons.

    Pure bunk. Ride the bike regularly, for at least 1/2 hour at highway speeds about three times a week is a more certain way to keep the battery up to snuff, and keep the bike exercised. A short five mile hoot across town to the local biker hangout is not the way to keep the battery up and active. Short in town rides actualy wear down battery life.

    Another more sure way is to use a Battery Tender or similar device. It'll do FAR more than any rubber pad, and insure the battery is ready to crank the bike over.

  8. #8
    BruceRT
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotorradMike View Post
    HD has a habit of designing old technology into their bikes.
    I'd check the battery case to see if it's made of leather before storing it on a concrete floor.
    Side stand on a floor though???
    A leather battery case? Oh my gosh, you just thought of the next accessory in Harley's catalog.
    Bruce
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  9. #9
    Registered User arthurdent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdimon View Post
    A leather battery case? Oh my gosh, you just thought of the next accessory in Harley's catalog.
    Don't forget the CHROME accents on the leather case!

  10. #10
    Curmudgeon At Large Bobmws's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by f14rio View Post
    a nice harley fella i know says he puts a piece of rubber on his garage floor and sets his bike's kick stand on it. he says direct contact with the concrete isn't a good idea. (current flow/battery discharge).

    anybody here heard that?

    fwiw, i have heard that you shouldn't store car batteries on a concrete floor. they should be stored on pieces of 2x4's

    I'll bet he has deer whistles on his bike too.....
    Bob Weis
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  11. #11
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    ...direct contact with the concrete isn't a good idea...f14rio
    Only if there's a lightning strike...
    Rinty

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  12. #12
    Registered User cehlbeck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobmws View Post
    I'll bet he has deer whistles on his bike too.....
    If he's on Harley wouldn't the "loud pipes save lives" mantra frighten off the deer?

    But seriously a stock HD sounds pretty nice.
    Chris Ehlbeck
    BMWMOA 168990
    Chris & Donna's Motorcycle Journeys

  13. #13
    Dale Rudolph
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    Somewhere in the forums in the last year or so, someone mentioned putting a piece
    of carpet under the centerstand .
    I think it was reduce the wear on the centerstand legs.

    I put a piece of indoor-outdoor carpet where the centerstand always goes down in
    the shop, It really does make getting it onto the stand easier. It tends to glide up
    without the thud that I get if doing it on bare concrete.

    Maybe if I could find an old Harley riders leather jacket to replace the carpet????

  14. #14
    Still plays with trains. tinytrains's Avatar
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    This is an old tale of no substance. As an electrical engineer I can tell you that you can park you bike on a earth-grounded steel plate and it will not drain the battery. The electric charge in a battery only flows from one terminal to the other. Connecting either side to the earth will not draw any current unless there is a path back to the other terminal.

    The earth works as a return for commercial AC power because the power company drives ground rods into it.

    This whole myth got started by English car guys who thought their positive ground cars would get dead batteries if the bumper touched a tree.

    Scott Schifer
    1988 K75 Low Seat
    2009 R1200R Roadster

  15. #15
    Lucky motorradmike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TinyTrains View Post
    This whole myth got started by English car guys who thought their positive ground cars would get dead batteries if the bumper touched a tree.

    Scott Schifer
    So as an Electrical Engineer, I'm sure you know that ground is supposed to be (-)ve, positive volts will not flow in black wires, and Lucas Industries ruined British Leyland.

    Edit: Holy crap, 1,000 posts and only 4 good ones, counting this one.
    Mike Marr
    1978 Yamaha XS750 (Needs rings), 1996 BMW R1100RS, 2004 Honda CRF230F

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