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Thread: Explain the nomenclature of BMW bikes.

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    It's a way of life! oldnslow's Avatar
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    Explain the nomenclature of BMW bikes.

    What does the 'slash-X' mean on air head bikes? ie; r75/? And what does RR stand for on the super bikes? I see it on alot of sport bikes. And what is a "toaster tank"?

    Thanks
    Mike Davis
    "Old n Slow" It's a way of life!
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    1998 R1100RT

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    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldnslow View Post
    What does the 'slash-X' mean on air head bikes? ie; r75/? And what does RR stand for on the super bikes? I see it on alot of sport bikes. And what is a "toaster tank"?

    Thanks
    Toaster tank: A fuel tank available in 1972/early 1973 for the /5's. It was the small of the two available tanks, fitted with chrome side panels -- looking very much like a 1950's toaster, ergo the name.

    Dealers couldn't get rid of them then; highly sought after now. My spouse's short-frame example (note /5's are divided into two groups -- SWB (short wheel base, 1970-early 1973), and LWB (long WB, early 1973-on -- 2" longer swingarm and rear subframe/seat):




    The slash-series refers to a BMW naming system which ended in 1980. After BMW was resurrected after WWII, when they introduced an updated boxer, they added a "/#" to distinguish the models (e.g., R51, R51/2).

    The system continued, with several inconsistencies, such as some /3's before other /2's, and no /'s (e/g., R69S)) up to 1969, when the first "modern" boxers (with the cam under the crank) were introduced. These were the R50/5, R60/5 and R75/5, model years 1970-73.

    1974 saw the updated R60/6, R75/6, R90/6 and R90S (1974-76).

    1977 saw the further updated R75/7 (one year, then R80/7), R100/7, R100S, R100RS, R100RT and R100T (1977-79).

    In 1980 BMW dropped the slashes, resulting in the R100, R100RS, etc. So, no slash designations since 1979.

    No idea on the RR designation -- it may not be anything but "RR sounds cool," from back in the day when "RR" on any vehicle usually referred to "road race."
    Mark Neblett
    Fairfax, VA
    #32806

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    Registered User David13's Avatar
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    Well, I never thought it should be slash two or slash five, I thought it should be slant sign two, or slant sign five. I think it just meant later production models.
    RR. Take your pick. Race Ready, Replica, etc, ad infinitum.
    Toaster tank is easy. Not a tank that also makes toast, but a tank that looks like a toaster.
    But, toast could come in handy in the a.m. But only if some coffee was available to wash it down with.
    dc

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    Lucky motorradmike's Avatar
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    "R" is bad in a motorcycle model when you try to get insurance.
    Good if you want to go really fast.

    Case in point. Honda RRCB600RRR.
    2 Rs seem to be OK if you have a reasonable insurance company.
    Mike Marr
    1978 Yamaha XS750 (Needs rings), 1996 BMW R1100RS, 2004 Honda CRF230F

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    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Duane offers similar info here:

    http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/slash.htm
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

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    One Man Wolfpack Kent Niederhofer's Avatar
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    BMW Nomenclature

    The "RR" in S1000RR stands for "Race Replica" as it does for all sport bikes that have a homologated racing version. The S1000RR is raced in WSBK (World Super Bike) and other series.

    Kent

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    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotorradMike View Post
    "R" is bad in a motorcycle model when you try to get insurance.
    Good if you want to go really fast.

    Case in point. Honda RRCB600RRR.
    2 Rs seem to be OK if you have a reasonable insurance company.
    "S" has the same effect
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

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    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    a good link for the / info

    http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/slash.htm

    and a Wiki model designation breakdown:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History...el_designation
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

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    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    Read them and now I have a headache.
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    Daily Rider jurgen's Avatar
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    R in BMW early single and all boxer models simply stands for "Rad" as in German for a two-wheeled vehicle, like Fahrrad (bicycle) or Motorrad (motorcycle).
    Not sure what K stands for, perhaps Konzept (concept)?
    J?rgen
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    rabid reader dbrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jurgen View Post
    Not sure what K stands for, perhaps Konzept (concept)?
    The first K-bikes (K100, 1983 and on up including the later 3-cylinder K75 machines) were "K" for "kompakt," referring to the engine/gearbox combination. It was marketing-speak, an attempt to distinguish BMW's horizontal-cylinder fore-and-aft crank motor from everyone else's machines. From a logical point of view, however, it was bunk: every manufacturer had an engine/gearbox combination, and most were much shorter than the pretty lengthy K100 assemblies.

    The new series Ks - K12s, K13s, and K16s - used this same nomenclature, and muddied the water.
    David Brick
    Santa Cruz CA
    2007 R1200R

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    Quote Originally Posted by jurgen View Post
    R in BMW early single and all boxer models simply stands for "Rad" as in German for a two-wheeled vehicle, like Fahrrad (bicycle) or Motorrad (motorcycle).
    Not sure what K stands for, perhaps Konzept (concept)?
    I called my friend at BMW Motorrad in Berlin and he confirmed that the "R" stood originally for "Rad" to identify and differentiate the product. Remember, BMW was an airplane engine manufacturer and also started to build cars in the late 20s.

    The "K" was originally a project abbreviation during the development of the new bikes. It was then used, again, to identify and differentiate while the "R" was relegated to the earlier singles and twins.

    The "F" was taken from the "Funduro" moniker for the early new singles.

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