Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 47

Thread: By accident I laid my 800GS down...couldn't pick it up!

  1. #16
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Braintree, MA
    Posts
    3,102
    Quote Originally Posted by Visian View Post
    hmmm... I wonder why this is called "how not to"...?

    this is how I pick up mine.
    I do it the same way, could never get far with that backwards way of doing it.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  2. #17
    Registered User teepke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Billerica, MA
    Posts
    361
    where there is a will there is a way!!!


    -tp
    '11 F800R

  3. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Northern Front Range, CO
    Posts
    6,440
    Quote Originally Posted by Teepke View Post
    where there is a will there is a way!!!


    -tp
    oh, not always. some situations are not easily recoverable.

    dropped my 8GS in some mud. picked it up. dropped it again in some mud. picked it up, but not quite as quickly. dropped it again in some mud (believe, me, i was trying to get out of there, but the terra was not so firma, and was fighting my best intentions and efforts)- and this time, i could not get any solid footing- tires and boots were in mud, with nothing solid nearby. Walked out about a mile, found some teens to lend a hand, walked back in, and with 3 bodies, it was pieca-cake easy.
    moral of the story- ride with company. and don't drop it in mud.
    Last edited by bikerfish1100; 03-10-2014 at 08:10 PM.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  4. #19
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    623
    A guy at a Finger Lakes Rally had his R1200GS parked flat on the ground. I wandered over and asked if that would bother the battery. He said no. I asked how he planned on picking it up. He showed me, using the back-into-the-bike method. Then he laid the bike down the ground and had me do it. Then I did it a second time.

    Okay, I'll admit it, I've picked my RT up off the ground twice now, but only the first month I've owned and not since then (bought new in '03).

    Harry

    PS: when putting the bike on the centerstand, follow Yoda's advice: "Not try, only do..."
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  5. #20
    Let's go scooterboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Nipomo, Ca
    Posts
    281
    While riding my '98 1100GS on a fireroad, I couldn't pick up the bike after dumping it. Having an 11 gal tank with about 8 gal in it I finally took the gas tank off and was able to get it up.
    Ride far enough today so you can't come home untill tomorrow. 1998 BMW 1100GS
    IBA# 47129

  6. #21
    RK Ryder
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    2,055
    Quote Originally Posted by tommcgee View Post
    Easiest way to pick up a bike is to ask for help.
    +1

    I can lift my bikes if need be (although haven't had the need for a few years) but whenever possible, follow Tom's advice.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  7. #22
    Registered User sit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    296
    Quote Originally Posted by rdalland View Post
    Hmmm, this is how I picked up my GS twice and is the way I was taught to pick up a bike in motor school.
    2005 K1200LT-Ocean Blue
    2013 Ural Patrol - White
    2007 R1200GS-Granite Gray-Sold
    2004 R1150R-Titan Silver-Sold

  8. #23
    Registered User 39520's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    isola di specchio
    Posts
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by DarrylRi View Post
    The way to pick up any bike is to put it in gear, get your butt under the bike as much as possible and then walk it backwards, pushing the bike with your butt. Be careful not to let it get over center.
    I stopped by a Honda shop one day that was owned by an 80 year old Gold Wing riding guy. I asked him about how hard it is to pick up a fallen GW. He took me outside, pushed his GW onto the grass, and laid it on its side.

    He picked it up no problem using the technique you describe. 80 years old, 800 lb bike.

  9. #24
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI
    Posts
    3,482

    Cool

    The 'problem' with 99% of the "How to Pick Up a Bike" videos and illustrations out there is that it always involves a motorcycle that has crash bars, engine guards or side cases that suspend the bike off the surface with enough clearance for you to get some leverage when walking it upright. As a Motor Officer, I used to do these demo's all the time as a public service.

    Not always the case, should your bike lack these attachments.

    Under those circumstances, best to follow two pieces of previous advice in this thread:

    Either carry rope to rig some sort of mechanical advantage from a fixed object (tree, pole, etc.), or simply ask for some assistance.
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

  10. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Kentucky
    Posts
    488
    I have never had to ask for assistance to pick up my RT. I'm usually in a situation with plenty of onlookers to witness my embarrassment and someone comes to my aid


    The couple of times I've dropped it with no one around I was able to get it up myself
    Anthony S.
    2012 R1200GS

  11. #26
    On the Road
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    76
    F8 is a pig... get a lighter bike

    here's the classic how to pick a bike up video (goldwing)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8Er4FFEQ8I


  12. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Durham,NC
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by _CY_ View Post
    F8 is a pig... get a lighter bike
    I thought I was doing that when I traded my FJR for the F800. I love the this bike! I really appreciate all the folks who have responded to this question. Great info.

  13. #28
    On the Road
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by Whosoever View Post
    I thought I was doing that when I traded my FJR for the F800. I love the this bike! I really appreciate all the folks who have responded to this question. Great info.
    if you love your bike .. you need to know this info:

    F8 has a 12:1 ratio engine which require premium fuel... no secret there. what's not commonly know is F8 motors don't have a knock sensor.

    what that means is ... if/when you get a bad load of fuel. there is nothing to protect your F8 engine from destroying itself, except what's between your ears.

    above scenario matters not if your F8 is remapped or not. if your bike starts to run funny with a loss of power. immediately after refueling.

    STOP ... don't try to ride it out... take off your helmet/ear plugs, then carefully listen ... bad fuel is not the only thing that can cause loss of power. but if it happens immediately after refueling. a bad load of fuel is suspect.

    easy to fix with no $$$... drain bad fuel, fill with fresh,.. then idle out remaining bad fuel in system. when engine no longer detonates with full throttle.... go on your way!

    a bad load of fuel say with diesel mixed in can cause F8 engine to detonate. resulting in a destroyed engine very quickly. NO knock sensor, combined with full helmet and/or ear plug, could be very bad news.

    lots of documented cases of folks destroying their almost new F800GS in remote locations with $2,500+ damages in short order.

    unless something has changed... don't think BMW is advertising this scenario.

    you might want to yank your almost new wheel bearings and repack with real grease. evidently lots of F800GS came with wheel bearing with very little to no grease inside sealed bearings. easy to fix with little to no $$$. pop off inside bearing seal, pack with grease... good to go.

  14. #29
    Norm Norms 427's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by _CY_ View Post
    if you love your bike .. you need to know this info:
    what that means is ... if/when you get a bad load of fuel. there is nothing to protect your F8 engine from destroying itself, except what's between your ears.
    Wow, then don't that bike up the Alaska Highway cause some of those lonely gas stations have only 87 octane for sale.
    Now: '12 R1200RT Midnight Blue Metallic / '11 Ural Patrol 2WD ridden to Alaska / '09 KLR 650 / '05 HD Heritage Softail / '08 Harley Sportster 1200C / '85 Yamaha VMax bought new. I wasn't ready to say goodbye: www.shaunlunt.typepad.com

  15. #30
    On the Road
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by Norms 427 View Post
    Wow, then don't that bike up the Alaska Highway cause some of those lonely gas stations have only 87 octane for sale.
    no telling... if you know it's coming, octane boosters will help marginal fuel. one can get a bad load of fuel anywhere.

    too many possible scenarios ... in known margin fuel areas like certain parts of SA. it's common for mama fuel vendors to operate out of 55 gal drums.

    it's not possible to drain every last bit of fuel out of 55 gal with a barrel pump. say one time tank held diesel, then filled with gasoline. a gallon or so of diesel mixed in with gas will cause major problems with a high compression engine.

    make sure you've got a big honking battery. Lots of cranking figuring out what's wrong and/or getting things going again.

    easy to fix ... drain fuel, then idle out remaining fuel... when engine no longer knocks under load ... good to go.

    can very difficult to hear engine detonation. especially with helmet and/or ear plug on. but the common giveaway is lost of power.

    bad fuel is not the only thing that causes loss of power. but if loss of power happens immediately after refueling. a load of bad fuel is suspect!

    STOP .. don't ride it out ... take your helmet off, then listen for engine knocks. once someone knows what to look for .. a major trip ending problem is avoided. broken rings, broken pistons, etc. $$$$ ... NO knock sensor to retard timing, so operator has to be the safety.

    sure hope this info gets passed on ...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •