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Thread: The short mileage gang

  1. #61
    sMiling Voni's Avatar
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    I don't know about you but I'm all about celebrating the sMiles however we find them!



    Voni
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  2. #62
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Every year we get this thread, it seems. And it often wanders off into a "who's better" type of discourse. Which totally misses the point that some of the posters have inquired about. That is the "how" do some riders ride that far in those time periods. I mentioned Voni rode 84,000 miles in one year (1999). Mike did some math and questioned how that could be. Well, I even understated the situation because in 1999 she rode 73,660 miles in the 6 months MOA contest. If the math for 84K in 12 months is hard try the math for 73K in 6 months. Then Ardys Kellerman at age 75 rode 82K in the contest and over 100K in the year.

    It simply comes down to the question of, from all of the things you do, how important is motorcycling compared to those other things. In our case, Voni's and Ardys' in particular, motorcycles are the primary modes of transportation. If they go anywhere it is by motorcycle most of the year. That was even true when we lived in Kansas where Voni commuted about 40 miles one way every day the weather permitted. Now we live in Texas, in the desert, 53 miles from town. When we shop we ride the bikes. We have been known not to move a car for 3 months.

    As for times and distances, Mike did assert one notion I am compelled to reply to. That is his statement regarding traffic engineers, speed limits and curves. In most states (not all) speed limits are set by the legislature, and they apply to most rural two-lane roads regardless of road geometrics. Then curve signs with a speed warning in a yellow diamond are posted in accordance with the Manual for Uniform Traffic Control Devices by traffic engineers. Riders/drivers are expected to adjust their speeds to road conditions, not just to the speed limit. So just because the speed limit is 65 or 70 or 75 does not mean straight roads necessarily.

    As an example, look at AR23 north and south of Cass, Arkansas using Google Earth or maps. The curve warning signs range from 10 to 45 mph, but the speed limit on the whole stretch is the statewide standard of 55. We rode this one yesterday.

    It is purely a simple fact that riding long distances on back roads in the spacious west is a lot easier than doing so in the congested urban/suburban east. Comparing one to the other is really hard to wrap your mind around until you do a bit of both. When I am in most places east of the Mississippi River 300 miles is a long day. In many places in the west 600 miles is not a long day.

    But you all ought to get out and ride as much as you want to, wherever and however you choose to do that. Or not if you have other things more important to you. Your choice.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  3. #63
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    Before retiring I also used to put about 15K/yr on the bike just going to work plus any fun and travel.
    Now, I get to do more, long runs not having to wait for a weekend to go somewhere but my total mileage is actually down without the commute base.
    Never had any interest in mileage contests and track it mostly so I know when to do maintenance....

  4. #64
    Registered User rxcrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    AR23 north and south of Cass, Arkansas.
    completely off topic, but the pig trail is a sweet road. You know these switchbacks just south of the mulberry mountain lodge. And there are a bunch more heading south to the Mexican place and walmart


    A little south of the switchbacks at our morning gas stop in Turner Bend


    Beautiful area


    And so many great forest roads and trails that I'd have a hard time heading there without a knobbies


    The traction is good and most of the trails are open, so bigger bikes are happy there too. There was a guy riding an HP2 with us and his son was on a F650 Dakar. Of course, I can't find those pictures.


    If you are still in the area, head over to Oark and find the little restaurant next to the pool hall for some frog legs and peach cobbler


    hijack off - back to the mileage thread

  5. #65
    sMiling Voni's Avatar
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    LOVE that road! I'd ride big sMiles to get there!

    Voni
    doing that
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  6. #66
    Registered User rhyeks's Avatar
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    I have entered the mileage contest each year since becoming a member. Some years I finish above the average and some I don't. I just enjoy participating, seeing my name listed among the other finishers and getting my pin in the mail!
    Ken
    2004 R1150RT
    2013 F800R

  7. #67
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rxcrider View Post
    completely off topic, but the pig trail is a sweet road.
    Those orange KTM's are not the usual parking lot sights! H-D Orange and a lot of black usually

    Will be passing by that Friday!

    Back to the mileage thing as well...
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  8. #68
    It's a way of life! oldnslow's Avatar
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    Holy Cow! You're not gonna put 500 miles a day riding a KTM. That factory used to use 2X4's for seat cushions, then they switched to something a little firmer! Rode one of those for a season, turned 'monkey butt' into "gorrila a**"!!
    Mike Davis
    "Old n Slow" It's a way of life!
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    1998 R1100RT

  9. #69
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldnslow View Post
    Holy Cow! You're not gonna put 500 miles a day riding a KTM. That factory used to use 2X4's for seat cushions, then they switched to something a little firmer! Rode one of those for a season, turned 'monkey butt' into "gorrila a**"!!
    and your being generous........KTM is trying to mimic my TW
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200
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  10. #70
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    I've thought about swapping my RT in for an F800GS to deal with the high price of gasoline. I would guess swapping out the seat would be one of the first things I would do if I get an F800GS.

    I don't resent people getting big miles. I kind of envy them. I also get some inspiration from them, too. I can retire anytime I want now, and riding may be my strongest motivation to pull the trigger and actually retire.

    Harry
    Last edited by AKsuited; 04-19-2012 at 03:21 AM.
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  11. #71
    Rpbump USN RET CPO Rpbump's Avatar
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    In August 2010 I rode from Jax FL to Shady Cove OR and back. Interstate miles accounted for 50% of the 6,450 mile trip. On the return leg I spent 1 rest day in Copperas Cove TX with a good friend and fellow rider. The trip took 13 days including the rest day. On reflection I now am happy to average 450 miles per day ( 3 tanks of fuel) as this allows for more scenic stops and "time to smell the flowers". Between the CLC and the HD I average about 12k miles total per year. The CLC getting trip/distance miles and the HD to/from work miles and occasional 200>300 mile day trips. High mileage just requires that you ride often. When I retired from the NAVY in 1987 I worked for 1 1/2 years at Andrews AFB just outside of DC and put 150K miles on my car commuting on weekends from work to home and back to work. Approximately 11.5 hrs each way. CB and radar detector really help to avoid speeding tickets.
    Cave Contents: 1980 R100RT/Ural Sidecar, 2004 R1200CLC, 2006 HD FSXTI
    Ride Safe

  12. #72
    Registered User rxcrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldnslow View Post
    Holy Cow! You're not gonna put 500 miles a day riding a KTM. That factory used to use 2X4's for seat cushions, then they switched to something a little firmer! Rode one of those for a season, turned 'monkey butt' into "gorrila a**"!!
    The Austrians are just helping you ride better - you aren't supposed to be sitting down.

  13. #73
    Jack Herbst
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by rxcrider View Post
    The Austrians are just helping you ride better - you aren't supposed to be sitting down.
    Just thinkin---when are we going to start the least mileage contest.

    Jack
    "All my life I wanted to be somebody. Now I realize I should have been more specific."

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaherbst View Post
    Just thinkin---when are we going to start the least mileage contest.

    Jack
    we already do. it's called "The Good Sport Award", and is part of the annual mileage contest.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by EMSimon View Post
    I still have a hard time believing that anybody can put 84,000 miles on a bike AND have a full time job, which usually keeps one busy for 225 days in the year. Sorry if I crossed the line and challenged what an MOA saint said. I will refrain from posting about issues like this hereafter.
    Then, the discussion turned to average speeds for daily trips. Has really nothing to do with Voni.
    You and Paul were characterizing the roads you travelled by stating the speed limits and average speeds you were able to achieve. Knowing our traffic engineers in the U.S., anything with a 70mph limit is straight! No turns! Most states in the Union do not have non-Interstate roads with a 70 mph speed limit.
    1)- Voni, as a HS teacher, only worked about 190 days/year. That would give her some of June, all of July, and much of August off (or, some of May, all of July, and much of August, depending upon how Kansas strutured their school year), leaving her free to go wherever/whenever. And she did.

    2)- we have plenty of roads out here that are not nearly straight, limits are 65 on 2 lanes, and towns are 30 or 50 or 75 miles apart, meaning that there is no need to slow down every 27 ft like you find "back east".

    3)- You really should not take your experiences and factor them across everyone else's. if what you do works for you- keep on doing it. If it does not, change it. And I and others will do the same as well.

    4)- Ride what you can, when you can, because you can. Really, it's not much more complicated nor much more simple than that.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

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