Results 1 to 15 of 41

Thread: Its all YOUR fault,.........first.

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Nickname: Droid
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    2,352

    Its all YOUR fault,.........first.

    Got your attention perhaps?

    That title is one of my beliefs about riding, "its all MY fault, first." Why? Because really I am the only one capable and responsible for making any changes in my riding attitude, riding habits, riding skills, riding choices, I am the FIRST one to make any headway towards improving my riding situation.

    NOT other road users. NOT car drivers. NOT legislators. NOT laws. NOT ABATE or the AMA. ME FIRST. NOT law firms certainly. All they do is clean up the results and claim big cash prizes (for their clients?). US first as riders must do the most we can to always ride our best ride, first, before we can expect anyone else to really respect us and look out for us.

    Here in Wisconsin, May is Motorcycle Awareness Month. Wisconsin is fairly aggressive and progressive when it comes to motorcycling. Perhaps because of Harley, Polaris, S&S and numerous other motorcycle companies here in the Badger state. Yet, every May I kinda cringe inside when I see the typical media public awareness "Watch for Motorcycles" announcements. Its become as regular and routine as the trees budding out new leaves in spring. Sure its a nice campaign, no one is offended, no one looks anyone in the eye saying, "yeah but, what are YOU personally doing about it?"

    So I wonder. What's the attitude amongst us largely "sport touring" riders? Do we have a different attitude about riding and rider responsibility than the rest of our riding breathern? Personally, I'd like to see a focus on us the riding public, to challenge ourselves to take on the responsibility of reduced risks of riding FIRST on our selves. I have always felt, the crash itself (there are no "accidents") is WAY too late to do anything about the results. But, its all about what was done, what wasn't done, what could/should have been done, BEFORE the crash that makes all the difference. Avoidance is the goal, NOT expecting someone else to do it for us.

  2. #2
    Lost again Texpaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, Tx
    Posts
    447
    Very good point. I agree, in the end we're the only one's who can change anything about our own surviveability while riding. A riding philosophy that expects others to watch out for us makes about as much sense as expecting a deer to look both ways before they cross the road.
    Paul Mulhern
    MOA# 56330
    '05 1200GS Big Blue

  3. #3
    Nickname: Droid
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    2,352
    HA! I like that analogy! Being in a state FULL of deer, and a good many brain dead car drivers, how can any motorcycle rider expect the self serving public attitude to do anything to improve their riding environment?

    I'm not saying we should ever forgive car drivers for their transgressions, unintentional though they may be, against us riders. I know for myself, I have made mistakes in traffic when in my car more so than on my bike. Quite often, when driving my car or pickup, I use it as a training opportunity to "see" myself on my bike out in traffic from the viewpoint of looking through a windshield, around a door post, in the rear view mirrors, over my blind spots, to give myslef the car driver perspective of me on my bike around them.

    No, don't forgive the car drivers. But we need to be realistic about ourselves first. Are we REALLY good at traffic strategies, are we REALLY good in our riding skills, are we REALLY not at fault for putting ourselves in a position of fault, either unintentionally by simple complacence, or by ignorance of the situation. I simply do not accept for myself, the aspect of "suddenly the car turned left, " or "suddenly the car took my lane," or "suddenly the car pulled out." And for myself, I certainly do not accept "there was nothing I could do."

    Oh yes, there are multitudes of things you can do, should have done, before you got to "suddenly."

  4. #4
    Registered User widebmw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    1,124
    Quote Originally Posted by Texpaul View Post
    Very good point. I agree, in the end we're the only one's who can change anything about our own surviveability while riding. A riding philosophy that expects others to watch out for us makes about as much sense as expecting a deer to look both ways before they cross the road.
    I found this online.
    You can do someting.

    "From Kearneysville:

    I live near a deer crossing and they keep getting hit. The county should move the deer crossing sign somewhere else. It is too dangerous for the deer to cross where it is now."

  5. #5
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    between SanAntone & the Weird Place, TX
    Posts
    6,010
    Quote Originally Posted by Texpaul View Post
    Very good point. A riding philosophy that expects others to watch out for us makes about as much sense as expecting a deer to look both ways before they cross the road.
    Like that one didn't do last Saturday? Got my attention for sure
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  6. #6
    RK Ryder
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    2,046
    I believe that those of us (on any brand) that do a considerable amount of riding, are constantly looking out for ourselves, because we have the most to lose when we don't. We are survivors.

    My neighbour, who sometimes rides one or two thousand kilometres a year, has told me that he had to put a loud muffler on his bike because cars were constantly cutting him off. He considers that he has done something proactive to protect himself. I would not be surprised if many riders like him think similarly. Riding courses might help him and others much more than a noisy machine.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Northern Front Range, CO
    Posts
    6,438
    last year's training shirts.....

    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  8. #8
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI
    Posts
    3,476

    Thumbs up

    Andy is spot on with where the emphasis must be if we are to reverse the ever-increasing number of motorcycle deaths in this nation.

    While making yourself as personally protected as possible (ATGATT) is essential, and making your motorcycle as conspicous as technology and budgets permit, it's really your attitude that will impact the most.

    Ride aware of your surroundings, get properly trained and keep getting re-trained, and take complete responsibility for your safety when riding.

    Granted, we 'share' the road with other motor vehicles, but we also share the road with potholes, gravel, rain, animals, debris, etc. The fact that out of all of these examples, vehicles are operated by fellow humans perhaps makes them the most dangerous of the bunch.

    Car drivers will make mistakes, do stupid things, and mother nature will always throw in the occasional curve ball, but the task of staying safe and getting home at night without damage or injury belongs to me and me alone.
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •