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Thread: Blind spot mirrors

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    George K1200RS GeorgeK1200RS's Avatar
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    Thanks for that posting. I have been using a variety of similar blind spot mirrors, but none have the degree of adjustabilty I desire.

    I have already contacted the company to see if they have vendors here in central Ohio...and asked about direct orders if there are no vendors.
    George
    R1200RT, K1200RS. Previous K1200LT, R80RT, R100R, R75/5

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    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Moving this post to GEAR since it's not hexhead specific.. hang on...
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
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    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

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    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    This topic received considerable discussion some time ago. Some experienced riders feel even the best blind spot mirrors (and I think Maxieview probably is the best) are not an acceptable alternative to a "shoulder check."

    Frankly, I REALLY like them on the bike. Be sure to 1. first adjust your main mirrors for the best view to the rear, 2. install the blind spot mirrors on the part of the main mirrors which gives you the most useless information - like body parts, 3. adjust the blind spot mirrors so that the front of a vehicle in the lane on either side is visible in your peripheral vision before it leaves the blind spot mirror. Using and trusting them DOES take practice, but I believe they can give you that 360 degree awareness of what is happening in your blind spots faster than shoulder checks, hence less time not looking ahead where most of the action is.

    One caveat: If there are TWO lanes, either to your left or right, you MUST shoulder check before changing lanes. Blind spot mirrors will not reveal the vehicle two lanes over moving into the space you covet. Something to remember if you ever ride freeways.

    Second caveat for cars: they are great on some, not needed on some (my Subaru Legacy wagon has a great enough field of view from the inside mirror that I can use the outside mirrors to cover the blind spots,) and just plain don't work on some (the surrounds on our Mazda Miata mirrors bumped the blind spot mirrors when my much shorter wife adjusted the mirrors for her seated position.)

    Finally, most of us (and me for sure) should resolve to have a quick glance in our mirrors much more often. How embarassing to have someone pass you that you didn't even know was behind you!
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

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    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    This topic received considerable discussion some time ago. Some experienced riders feel even the best blind spot mirrors (and I think Maxieview probably is the best) are not an acceptable alternative to a "shoulder check."

    Frankly, I REALLY like them on the bike. Be sure to 1. first adjust your main mirrors for the best view to the rear, 2. install the blind spot mirrors on the part of the main mirrors which gives you the most useless information - like body parts, 3. adjust the blind spot mirrors so that the front of a vehicle in the lane on either side is visible in your peripheral vision before it leaves the blind spot mirror. Using and trusting them DOES take practice, but I believe they can give you that 360 degree awareness of what is happening in your blind spots faster than shoulder checks, hence less time not looking ahead where most of the action is.

    One caveat: If there are TWO lanes, either to your left or right, you MUST shoulder check before changing lanes. Blind spot mirrors will not reveal the vehicle two lanes over moving into the space you covet. Something to remember if you ever ride freeways.


    Second caveat for cars: they are great on some, not needed on some (my Subaru Legacy wagon has a great enough field of view from the inside mirror that I can use the outside mirrors to cover the blind spots,) and just plain don't work on some (the surrounds on our Mazda Miata mirrors bumped the blind spot mirrors when my much shorter wife adjusted the mirrors for her seated position.)

    Finally, most of us (and me for sure) should resolve to have a quick glance in our mirrors much more often. How embarassing to have someone pass you that you didn't even know was behind you!
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  6. #6
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    I use a shoulder check. I also find if I lean forward a bit the view in the rear mirror shifts so I can see into the blind spot. I have a wide angle mirror mounted on left side mirror, but never seem to use it. Shoulder check is better.
    Walter

    All government, of course, is against liberty.
    H. L. Mencken

  7. #7
    Prefers to play martinph's Avatar
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    Installing blind spot mirrors, does not mean one stops shoulder checking. imho you can never shoulder check too much.
    I have some home made blind spot mirrors on my bike, you can see them in the Feb. issue of BMWON, page 12. They work well. Adjust very well, just bend them.
    Martin. BMW MOA Ambassador.17748
    BMW MOA Charter, Life member.
    Valley BMW Riders. British Columbia.

  8. 03-16-2012, 01:52 PM

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    All-round Motorcyclist MarkM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brewmeister View Post
    I always shoulder check,
    Why don't they show a price without going through the hoops on there website? Hiding something?
    +1 on shoulder check.

    Click "Buy Now" button and it show all the prices.
    Mark M, St. Louis, '13 R1200GS, '01 Super Sherpa
    There are two roads in life; the twisty one is vastly more fun.

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    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    First, my apolgies for somehow posting the same thing twice. (Posts 4 and 5.)

    My question for all of you who DO have "blind spot" mirrors but STILL shoulder check is WHY? (Two lanes on either side the noted exception.) Seems to me, if you don't trust the blind spot mirrors, why have them?

    Do any of you regular "shoulder checkers" disagree with my premise that a shoulder check takes at least a half second longer than a glance in the mirror with a good blind spot mirror? That's 44 feet of travel at 60 mph - which can be important in heavy traffic.

    So, you shoulder checkers - state your case, and please, not "it is what we teach (or were taught) at the MSF class. I and others are very open to well-reasoned argument. After all, what is at stake is our personal safety and we all need to make "best practices" automatic.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

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    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    My question for all of you who DO have "blind spot" mirrors but STILL shoulder check is WHY? (Two lanes on either side the noted exception.) Seems to me, if you don't trust the blind spot mirrors, why have them?
    I don't have them now, but I have had them in the past. The answer to your question is that if I see something in the blind spot mirrors I don't need the head check because I know something is there and I'm not going to change lanes into it.

    On the other hand if I don't see anything and I want to change lanes I still need the head check. Why? Because the blind spot mirrors don't tell me what may be in that blind spot a second from now. Turning my head gives me a better view what's coming. You've got to worry about more than the cars going your speed. The ones going faster are the ones that can surprise you.

  12. #11
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    Use SAENG mirrors on my GS, they advertise in ON
    Mount to the mirror stem
    Quality product

  13. #12
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    My question for all of you who DO have "blind spot" mirrors but STILL shoulder check is WHY?
    I would suggest that a shoulder check gives a better idea of exactly where the vehicle is, it's velocity and whether it is changing lanes than just using a mirror, especially a mirror that distorts distance, which these wide view mirrors do.
    Walter

    All government, of course, is against liberty.
    H. L. Mencken

  14. #13
    OldBMWMaster JDOCKERY132445's Avatar
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    Mirrors work

    Perhaps it is all the time I have spent towing, but I trust my mirrors. For me, shoulder checking is unnecessary; slower riders might not feel the same.
    Jerry Dockery
    309 N. 3rd. Ave.
    Kure Beach, NC 28449
    1996 R1100RT main bike & 1985 K100RS...too fast to believe.

  15. #14
    George K1200RS GeorgeK1200RS's Avatar
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    Why have both

    Quote: My question for all of you who DO have "blind spot" mirrors but STILL shoulder check is WHY?

    I am completely blind in my right eye...have been since I was a boy. Doing a shoulder check on the right means turning my head so I have virtually no view of the road ahead. A blind spot mirror helps me know if ANYTHING is on my right. I don't care what it is. I don't fully rely on the mirror if I am actually seeking to change my lane. The mirror helps eliminate surprises and gives me an additional margin of safety.
    George
    R1200RT, K1200RS. Previous K1200LT, R80RT, R100R, R75/5

  16. #15
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    First, my apolgies for somehow posting the same thing twice. (Posts 4 and 5.)
    I just thought you were stuttering.
    My question for all of you who DO have "blind spot" mirrors but STILL shoulder check is WHY? (Two lanes on either side the noted exception.) Seems to me, if you don't trust the blind spot mirrors, why have them?
    I don't have them. I have both the fairing mounted mirrors and a set of GS mirrors on my bars of my RT. The fairing mirrors are set as wide as they go to keep an eye on what's out there wider/closer [aka, blind spots] than the handlebar mirrors can cover. I may buy a set of these to put on the fairing mounted mirrors.

    I always head check and that won't ever change. However, I ride about 40 percent of my ride in the mirrors, quick glancing all the time. I think anything you can do to increase information about what's in your safety envelope on the road is a good thing.

    Again though, there is no equal to head checking to change lanes and make turns on a bike and I'm well trained to do so in my car as well. Mirrors are great to see what's out there - direct line of sight has no equal.
    Nom de Plume:
    Steve Aikens, Clovis, NM
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