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Thread: Another one of those rebuild stories R50/5

  1. #46
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    Cleaned up the flywheel housing. Now for that rear main seal.
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  2. #47
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    Just grip it and rip it. After trying to pull from the top of the seal with a pair of pliers I was able to get it out by pulling near the bottom of the seal. Check out the washer behind the seal. There's another one of these metal rings just on the other side, inside the casing. It's held there just by resting on two little pins that you can see here in this picture. If the crank slides forward enough (4mm) and the inside washer falls off those pins you're looking and gutting the casing to put it back in place. I not expecting to do that.
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  3. #48
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    Washer and old seal. Now to get those pesky phillips screws out out the oil pump cover and replace the seal there before backing out.
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  4. #49
    Registered User 163750's Avatar
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    Just checking in on your thread, I have an R60/6 with 32K un-documented miles, I can probably times that by the power of three for a more accurate assessment of the bikes use. I am in the middle of a complete refurb. I am glad to see that I am not the only person that ever bought a set of hammer head shocks. The previous owner at least attempted to update the suspension. These were actually pretty decent components in their day. They always sparked an interesting conversation when some one noticed them. I think they are still available as NOS from some one on Fleece Bay, or at least a decent reproduction. I am still trying to unwrap the mystery of the piston code to determine what I need to order to redo the top end. Good luck.
    AirMonger

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by 163750 View Post
    Just checking in on your thread, I have an R60/6 with 32K un-documented miles, I can probably times that by the power of three for a more accurate assessment of the bikes use. I am in the middle of a complete refurb. I am glad to see that I am not the only person that ever bought a set of hammer head shocks. The previous owner at least attempted to update the suspension. These were actually pretty decent components in their day. They always sparked an interesting conversation when some one noticed them. I think they are still available as NOS from some one on Fleece Bay, or at least a decent reproduction. I am still trying to unwrap the mystery of the piston code to determine what I need to order to redo the top end. Good luck.
    I shipped my cylinder/pistons/heads to Dan at CycleWorks in KS. He said the cylinders and pistons meet spec however the exhaust valves and seats need replacement.
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  6. #51
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    Check out that notch caused by chain slack! I never noticed any metal bits in the oil during oil changing but that might be because I've had this bike long enough to necessitate only one oil change.
    Time for a new timing chain!!
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  7. #52
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    Until my buddy with the impact driver shows up to help me back out those stubborn phillips screws that hold on the oil pump cover, I think I'll work on the chain.

    These engines come from the factory with an endless chain. I'm thinking that this is the original chain because of this. Clymer suggests factory chain remove by some elaborate steps that include $$$$ of special tools in order to pull the cam shaft. Snowbum suggest to cut the damn thing off. Mmmm let me think about this for a minute.....
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  8. #53
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    It was pretty tight in there but I got it cut. By the way, that flywheel removal tool paid for it's weight in gold and helped out as a guard to keep me from cutting into the casing.
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    Last edited by barrettnjones; 03-18-2012 at 12:12 PM.

  9. #54
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    So the new chain has a master link for installation with ease. Yeah right. Ease? Suppose it was easier than having to remove the cam shaft. The amount of drama created by trying to get the chain on required the use of expletives I didn't know I knew. Here's the little circlip that the new chain came with. You need two. They only sent two. Hold your breath. I got the first one on but the second clip flew off into oblivion. So for another $5 I purchased the 'easier' to install fish clip on the left.
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  10. #55
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    Here's the amount of space one has available when installing the final link and clip. :bang head
    Just a word on the cam and crank gears. The amount of wear on them didn't look excessive enough to replace them. So I'm just doing a new chain here on the front side.
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  11. #56
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    Got my frame back from the sandblaster, seen on lift here.
    This is Ray Atwood of Atwood cycles right down the road in Bolton, VT. He's a painter. He's going to make my frame and some additional parts look like new.
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  12. #57
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    After a week Ray shared a teaser of the results. Remember those old rusty turn indicator stalks? BAM! This is going to be gooood! Can't wait to see the rest of his work!
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  13. #58
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    barrett, that's paint?! What paint? Name, names!

    An old trick I've shared in the past; anytime you're assembling/disassembling anything that has parts that are prone to flying off into the dark regions, use a dry cleaner bag to cover the work area (if possible). They're thin enough to see through easily and will stop that little widget from leaving the immediate area.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  14. #59
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    Well, the tool for installation of the rear main seal purchased from Cycle Works did it's job and installation went well. My buddy brought over an impact driver to get those oil pump cover screws out and I was able to replace the old cover with a new one that facilitates hex head. All this happened in a late night flurry of work so I was unable to take any pics of this. So here's one with the flywheel back on.
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  15. #60
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    I cut the heads off to of the old flywheel bolts off and made notches in order to use them as guide dowels to get the flywheel back on without and aligned easily.
    I read on Snowbum's site that these older engine's flywheel bolts get torqued to a mere 45-50 ft/lbs. doesn't seem like a lot but who am I to ague.
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