Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Civilian Police Motorcycle Course

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Orono, MN
    Posts
    24

    Civilian Police Motorcycle Course

    Has anyone had the opportunity to take this course? It is beng offered by an area technical college through their customized training.

    Class Description
    The Civilian Police Motorcycle Course (CPMC) is an advanced, 8-hour course for experienced riders. The course uses the same techniques designed to train and keep police motor officers safe, day after day, in any weather and traffic situation. The course will develop coordinated fine-muscle control, balance, skill, and confidence, particularly in the areas of low-speed clutch, throttle and brake control with proper head, eye, and body position. Students learn to master tight and locked turns in confined spaces, as well as slow and 30 mph offset weaves, the intersection (iron cross), 40 mph brake-and-escape, J-turn, and formation riding. Riders must have at least 3 years or 12,000 miles of riding experience to take this course. 0.8 CEU

    As always, your feedback is appreciated. Thanks

    Tim Bro
    '85 K100RT; '90 K75RT; '91 K75RT; '05 R1200GS

  2. #2
    Registered User kurt1305's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    255
    The police motors course I attended was 80 hours. The patterns listed are certainly a very good start.
    2014 R1200GS Adventure

  3. #3
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI
    Posts
    3,466

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by kurt1305 View Post
    The police motors course I attended was 80 hours. The patterns listed are certainly a very good start.
    80+ for me (maybe a slow learner, huh?!)

    But like you said - a nice 'sample' of the Police Course.

    FYI, in Wisconsin, we teach the UBBC - the "Ultimate Bike Bonding Course."

    It's an MSF course - fun way to experience similar LEO techniques on your bike.
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

  4. #4
    Registered User MOTOR31's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Full timr RV'er, where we park is home. No fixed address or location.
    Posts
    2,223
    My agency had a slightly different approach. My LEO course was 160 hours. That was because the agency did their own course first to insure the graduation rate was good enough in the actual state certification course to justify the expense. In plain language they taught us most of the course and rode our butts hard to make sure we passed the more detailed state course.

    The 8 hour class sounds nice and more training is always good. If it deals with slow speed precision riding it will be very very hard on a BMW dry clutch. That kind of riding calls for feathering the clutch and rear brake, also something more difficult to do with an interlinked brake system. If you have the option to use their wet clutch bike or have one of your own I recommend you use that bike for the class.
    DEFINITION OF A VETERAN A Veteran - whether active duty, retired, national guard or reserve - is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a check made payable to "The United States of America", for an amount of "up to and including my life."
    Author Unknown

  5. #5
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI
    Posts
    3,466

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Motor31 View Post
    My agency had a slightly different approach. My LEO course was 160 hours. That was because the agency did their own course first to insure the graduation rate was good enough in the actual state certification course to justify the expense. In plain language they taught us most of the course and rode our butts hard to make sure we passed the more detailed state course.

    The 8 hour class sounds nice and more training is always good. If it deals with slow speed precision riding it will be very very hard on a BMW dry clutch. That kind of riding calls for feathering the clutch and rear brake, also something more difficult to do with an interlinked brake system. If you have the option to use their wet clutch bike or have one of your own I recommend you use that bike for the class.
    +1 on that advice!

    I won't take the UBBC (MSF Ultimate Bike Bonding Course) on my R1200RT because of what it will do to that dry clutch.

    Police techniques are neat, but they're hard on the clutches (wet or dry) - thing is, as Motor Officers, we never worried about that when it wasn't our bike and clutch plates would be routinely replaced as needed.
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Maryland.
    Posts
    149
    Where can I sign up for this course ?

  7. #7
    Registered User MOTOR31's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Full timr RV'er, where we park is home. No fixed address or location.
    Posts
    2,223
    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post
    +1 on that advice!

    I won't take the UBBC (MSF Ultimate Bike Bonding Course) on my R1200RT because of what it will do to that dry clutch.

    Police techniques are neat, but they're hard on the clutches (wet or dry) - thing is, as Motor Officers, we never worried about that when it wasn't our bike and clutch plates would be routinely replaced as needed.
    Well to be fair. In an in-service training day the training bike I was riding had a clutch failure just before lunch. The other guys went and got lunch and brought me a bag o' burgers when they got back. While they were gone I swapped out the clutch plates using hand tools on the kawa I was riding. The spare bike wouldn't start and we suspected the gas in the tank had water in it. It wasn't a good job swapping the clutch plates because the oil should have been changed as well but it got me through the day.

    I would have had to repeat the day if we had been using the BMW's that the dept got to replace the no longer produced kawa's. On the other hand there are still a few of the kawas being riden today by the few Motors left in my Department. Those old bikes still work better than the BMW's and later, Harleys they got to replace the beemers for enforcement duty.
    DEFINITION OF A VETERAN A Veteran - whether active duty, retired, national guard or reserve - is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a check made payable to "The United States of America", for an amount of "up to and including my life."
    Author Unknown

  8. #8
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI
    Posts
    3,466

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Motor31 View Post
    Well to be fair. In an in-service training day the training bike I was riding had a clutch failure just before lunch. The other guys went and got lunch and brought me a bag o' burgers when they got back. While they were gone I swapped out the clutch plates using hand tools on the kawa I was riding. The spare bike wouldn't start and we suspected the gas in the tank had water in it. It wasn't a good job swapping the clutch plates because the oil should have been changed as well but it got me through the day.

    I would have had to repeat the day if we had been using the BMW's that the dept got to replace the no longer produced kawa's. On the other hand there are still a few of the kawas being riden today by the few Motors left in my Department. Those old bikes still work better than the BMW's and later, Harleys they got to replace the beemers for enforcement duty.
    Kawasaki made a good police motor - no arguement there. Interesting to hear there are still some in service!

    Or, .......... you could skip years of trial and error by dozens of professional instructors that has resulted in an 80+ hour course of mind-numbing intensity and purchase the overly-marketed DVD that has everything funneled down to just a day on your bike and you've learned it all!

    Yeah .... right. What was that famous quote by P.T. Barnum?!
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Orono, MN
    Posts
    24

    Thumbs up Great Advice

    I will park the beemers for the day and use the wife's Kawa KLR650 that thankfully, has a wet clutch for the class.

    The class prep. includes taping all mirrors, etc. I believe they are anticipating numerous "tip-overs".

    Tim Bro

    '85 K100RT; '90 K75RT; 91 K75RT; '05 R1200GS

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •