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Thread: Best book I've read in a while

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  1. #1
    Vox Ox hallzee's Avatar
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    Best book I've read in a while

    I've read many IBA, and other touring books over the years, but this one is one of the best ever. Lots of great, well thought out advice for cruising/touring bike prep, maintenance, etc.

    Also talks about the mental state and psyche that seperates those that like to ride, and those that LOVE to ride.

    http://www.amazon.com/Cruiser-Motorc...7071230&sr=8-3
    Brian Hall
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    '13 GTL - "Eva"
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  2. #2
    Ed Kilner #176066
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    The Amazon preview did not entice me to buy. Can you say a bit more about it?
    Ed
    2011 R1200RT Thunder Gray Metallic; 2000 Triumph 900(sold)
    http://triumphantsblog.blogspot.ca/

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    Curmudgeon in training alzyck's Avatar
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    I might have misread the prologue on amazon, but the premise seemed to be that motorcyclists choose to ignore the potential danger of riding a bike. It will never happen to me (the lazarus effect).

    It seems to me it's exactly the opposite. Most of the riders I know are fully aware of the potential danger. That's why when we talk about safety, we say things like "I ride like the other person is out to kill me" or "dress for the fall, not for the ride." I think we totally get the risk. We try to minimize it with our behavior to a level that's acceptable to ourselves, but I don't think we blissfully ignore it.
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  4. #4
    I Like My Bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by alzyck View Post
    I might have misread the prologue on amazon, but the premise seemed to be that motorcyclists choose to ignore the potential danger of riding a bike. It will never happen to me (the Lazarus effect).
    I think it's accurate for many cruiser riders. When I see someone grossly under-dressed, it's either a 19 year old squid on a Japanese supersport or someone riding a big cruiser... Usually a HD. I also see it a lot on Goldwings too.
    I almost always see people in full armor on BMW, Triumph (non-cruisers), even Ducati!

    Oh well. If one reads 'Zen and Motorcycle Maintenance', on would be appalled by how much drinking, they do on the ride. There's no gear to speak of. Perhaps because it is a product of the 70's. Still an interesting book.

    My favorite book lately comes from Melissa Holbrook Pierson... She wrote "The Perfect Vehicle: What It Is About Motorcycles".


    The Man Who Would Stop At Nothing

    It covers John Ryan's record breaking journey from Prudohe Bay Alaska to Key West Florida in just over 86 hours.
    More interestingly, perhaps, it catalogs Pierson's own journey back into motorcycling following a divorce, children, etc.

    Excellent read!

    Jimmy

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    Vox Ox hallzee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCJIMMY View Post

    The Man Who Would Stop At Nothing

    It covers John Ryan's record breaking journey from Prudohe Bay Alaska to Key West Florida in just over 86 hours.
    More interestingly, perhaps, it catalogs Pierson's own journey back into motorcycling following a divorce, children, etc.

    Excellent read!

    Jimmy
    +1, I love that book too!
    Brian Hall
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    '13 GTL - "Eva"
    IBA #31242 (SSx2, BB, BBG)

  6. #6
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    Little off topic... but the best book I've read about motorcycles/moto culture is Hunter S. Thompson's Hell's Angels.

    I always tell people to read it before buying their first motorcycle... Great book!

  7. #7
    Out There Somewhere bmwrider88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCJIMMY View Post
    Oh well. If one reads 'Zen and Motorcycle Maintenance', on would be appalled by how much drinking, they do on the ride. There's no gear to speak of. Perhaps because it is a product of the 70's. Still an interesting book.
    Jimmy
    hmmm. i'd be interested to read this, (NOT Zen & The Art of...) for various reasons. this book the thread is about APPEARS to take an in depth look at being safety minded RE: motorcycling- tho it was hard to tell exactly from the brief Amazon description most of what i got came from the reviews.

    i had to chuckle at the comment above... "product of the 70s". it may be more accurate to say that the "Zen" mind-set reflects more of the entire history of the recreational motorcyclist's mentality... seems (to me) that initially, motorcycles came about as a serious means of motorised transportation and morphed into more a recreational game later on. look at any old pix of motorcyclists from the 1940s, 50s, 60s or 70s. nobody was wearing any amount of protective gear at all, off the race track. back in the 60s and 70s, full leather, boots, gloves, and any old helmet was as much protective gear as anyone would be likely to see- on or off the track. in those days, that WAS ATGATT. many times, it was serious HD riders who were sporting the gear. if someone today, produced a brand new line of protective gear based 100% on, say- 1958 standards, folks would laugh at the level of exposure such gear would provide, instead of marveling at its protective qualities. like everything else, things have evolved dramatically, along with awareness, and technology.

    i happen to dislike the scaredy-pants mentality of
    "that's gonna kill ya, boy", or "you'll shoot an eye out with that thing". i'll give a rock solid nod to realistic dangers of various sporting or recreational activities but refuse to be sold anything based on somebody else fear driven notions of what's best for me... reality is enough, combined with my own (thankfully limited) first hand knowledge of what a crash feels like, to compel me to take motorcycling seriously and dress up accordingly.

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    "Blissfully ignorant", "choose to ignore dangers"; not me. I wear my gear, helmet, gloves, etc everytime I ride, no matter where or how far. I am amazed at people who are ignorant like the folks I see boarding airplanes wearing heels or flipflops. If an evacuation is needed (Yes, its extremely rare), how fast do you think you can run in lousy footwear ? You need all the edge you can get, no matter the endeavor. Now, back to the book.
    '03 R1150R, '03 F650GS, '97DR200SE,'78 Honda CT-90, '77Honda CT-90

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    Registered User PeoriaMac's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by OCJIMMY View Post
    IMy favorite book lately comes from Melissa Holbrook Pierson... She wrote "The Perfect Vehicle: What It Is About Motorcycles".

    [Jimmy


    I loved the book and passed it along to some of my riding friends. It's a bit of a cautionary tale as to how far someone can get into any activity for good or bad...
    Mac
    Mac
    1986 R80RT, 2005 R1200GS
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  10. #10
    just hangin' out 2bikemike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alzyck View Post
    I might have misread the prologue on amazon, but the premise seemed to be that motorcyclists choose to ignore the potential danger of riding a bike. It will never happen to me (the lazarus effect).

    It seems to me it's exactly the opposite. Most of the riders I know are fully aware of the potential danger. That's why when we talk about safety, we say things like "I ride like the other person is out to kill me" or "dress for the fall, not for the ride." I think we totally get the risk. We try to minimize it with our behavior to a level that's acceptable to ourselves, but I don't think we blissfully ignore it.
    Fully aware, yet you ride anyway. I think that was the point the author was making. Regardless of the gear, if hit head on by an automobile going fast enough,(think drunk or texting driver) I don't think it's gonna matter what you wear.
    keep it light enough to travel.....
    '04 R1150RT
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  11. #11
    Ambassador at Large JIMSHAW's Avatar
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    The Man Who Would Stop At Nothing

    Another vote for Melissa Pierson's book about John Ryan as an accomplished icon and herself as a riding aficionado incidentally comparing their motives and character. I am on my third reading, and I keep finding more depth to the characters of John and Melissa.

    The book is not about the nuts and bolts of riding. It's about the perceptions, incentives and mandates real riders might feel.

    John currently rides a Yamaha and a BMW. Melissa rides a Moto Guzzi and a BMW.

  12. #12
    Registered User Dakar001's Avatar
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    Running with the Moon

    Best I've read in a while is Running with the Moon by Jonny Bealby. No agenda, no preaching this or that, just a great African adventure ride, solo.
    1983 R80ST
    2010 R1200GS

  13. #13
    GIZMO
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMW Triumphant View Post
    The Amazon preview did not entice me to buy. Can you say a bit more about it?

    Me neither, but someone on another forum also posted a positive comment on the book, so I too would be interested to hear more.

  14. #14
    Vox Ox hallzee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMW Triumphant View Post
    The Amazon preview did not entice me to buy. Can you say a bit more about it?
    It's a "little of something for everybody"; talks about pre-ride prep, riding comfort, tires, shocks, brakes, group etc., etc.

    A great deal of the book speaks to things that I am already aware of (I've been riding for 37 years), but helpful tidbits in many areas.
    Brian Hall
    Remember, the early worm gets eaten...
    '13 GTL - "Eva"
    IBA #31242 (SSx2, BB, BBG)

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