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Thread: got the R90 out in the sun

  1. #46
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    Decided to slightly raise the tank rear about 2 to 3 mm with faucet washers.
    Now you've done it...you've raised the bike's CG! How with the plastic work against the paint? Do you see any problems there?? Or are the washers rubber as well...
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  2. #47
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Or are the washers rubber as well...
    Faucet washers ARE rubber.
    Justin in Somerville, MA
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    76 R75/6, 78 P200E, 63 VBB
    Lots of bicycles

  3. #48
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    Note the increased clearance for the amplifier and other various parts. Should help keep the amp in the airflow.
    I wouldn't think that will help a great deal, but what the heck, it's easy enough to try. It might be more helpful if it was on the front side, but you've just skooched up the rear a bit. Get back to us in another 20 years...let us know the result of the experiement.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  4. #49
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    This is the first I've seen of this thread and your bike, and I have to say it's a beauty.

    I do have a question about the Dell-ortos. If you ridden other airheads, is it a big performance bump between those and the Bings?

  5. #50
    Monza Blue 1974 R90/6
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    Outstanding! I really like those aluminum tanks and after your comment about it being a good shop project, I've been turning it over in my mind. It would be so much more satisfying to build it yourself. I couldn't figure out how to mold the inside though. Really interesting in watching your project.

    Regards,

    Barron

  6. #51
    RPG
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    I marked off the steel brace and almost started drilling, but it looks so cool I figgered I keep it and get a 90/90 front tire next time. Here's another pic, note my new lawn and garden battery with 365 cranking amps at 32 F. Still have to assemble some of the last items including a ninety degree petcock from Huckys so I can git that darn dipstick out a little easier.
    On a good note, the color looks like the old BMW folding lock and might deter some thieves.

    RPG

  7. #52
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    ummm ... just wonderin' ... 8n8, when you get done dinkin' around with your gas tank could you know out one of the these for me?







    nice project!
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  8. #53
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    I couldn't figure out how to mold the inside though. Really interesting in watching your project.
    One approach would be to pull a tooling plaster cast (reinforced with hemp bats) off of the interior of a donor tank; you would have to remove the front and rear cross bars. UltraCal B30 is a suitable low-shrink tooling grade gypsum.

    From that you would have a "positive" form to measure from to build a wooden buck, if in fact it might just survive as a one-off forming tool.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  9. #54
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    There's gonna be more than three pieces to this tank.
    Who cares?! It's looking pretty damned good to me so far!!

    Just remember, you don't have to weld the thing up solid; tack it together as you go. That way you can always break a panel loose if you want to change something. One other piece of equipment to consider is a big enough bucket, or trough, or (?) that you can quench your panels in after to anneal them. Most metals "work harden" as they are formed. To keep forming it deeper, it's necessary to anneal the metal with a torch and quench it.

    i.e. (not my work)

    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  10. #55
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Are you going beef it up and to try and use it as a tool, or are you going to take measurements off of it and build a wooden buck?

    If you need plaster in a 50# quantity (for example) you can usually get what you need from a local "pottery supply" guy (check yellow pages). A fifty pound bag is probably around $20-25 range. Cheaper than buying it by the pound.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  11. #56
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Maybe the whole attempt is a bust, but what the hay
    Well, if you're going to bite off a chunk, it might as well be a big one. There's no honor in crashin' with the brakes on.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  12. #57
    John. jstrube's Avatar
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    The alternative to buying a TIG rig is going to a local community college. Take a class... If you can gas weld, you can learn to TIG. The skills are similar. Or, pay a real pro, there are some guys who are just artistic with that stuff. Me, I have a nice setup & can weld steel just fine, but aluminum is still a bit of trouble. It pays to get a bunch of coupons cut & practice. Can't wait to see how this turns out!
    John.

  13. #58
    advrider.com
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    Well, this is awesome!

  14. #59
    Registered User toooldtocare's Avatar
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    Boy, that looks nice.

  15. #60
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    Wood and Iron

    Amazing job, 898, no matter what happens next!

    Congratulations for sticking with this project - you do beautiful work. Saaaay - maybe you could just use a Dremel tool, hollow out the internal wood, coat insides with POR 15, paint outside to match the rest of the tin. . .gas her up, and GO! No need to find a competent welder or spend money on expensive aluminum.

    Just a thought.

    Walking Eagle

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