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Thread: Crash Chronicles (Crashes and Near Misses)

  1. #31
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    Once again I have one on video

    Another near miss. A mini van pulled out from behind a shrub at a gas station. Then they stopped in my lane. In hindsight, I was going too fast.

    http://youtu.be/gs0HVfrrc8w
    Last edited by LuckyGrownup; 06-07-2012 at 11:53 AM. Reason: grammer check

  2. #32
    Registered User alphashifter's Avatar
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    Riding to work Tuesday morning on Interstate 25, in the far left lane at about 75-80 mph with other traffic - vehicles on 3 sides and a concrete barrier on my left.
    Tire fragments from a semi got my attention, but I wasn't ready for the whole tire that shot into my lane like a Peterbuilt hockey puck...It probably had been struck repeatedly by other traffic. I had nowhere to go and no time to brake. I might have moved a foot or two to the left before impact.
    I nailed the tire and to my surprise, the bike glanced off of it - (I don't know which glanced off of which, but I didn't stop dead in my tracks or get flipped into oncoming traffic).
    The bike started to do the freeway-speed wobble but quickly recovered, and I got over to the right shoulder as fast as I could.
    Expecting bent forks, trashed tire & rim, torn-off brake lines, exhaust leaks and other damage, I found a cracked horn, some smouldering rubber on the pipe and a little paint missing from the right valve cover. And a new button hole sewn into the seat.
    I rode it another 20 hiccup-free miles to work and looked for more damage. Found none. Rode the 50 miles home this morning and the bike seems to be as happy to be alive as I am.
    Those discarded tire fragments mean something totally new to me now.
    '78 R100RS/S
    '70 R75/5
    '01 Royal Enfield Bullet 500

  3. #33
    aka Johnny Hammerlane bullet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphashifter View Post
    Riding to work Tuesday morning on Interstate 25, in the far left lane at about 75-80 mph with other traffic - vehicles on 3 sides and a concrete barrier on my left.
    Tire fragments from a semi got my attention, but I wasn't ready for the whole tire that shot into my lane like a Peterbuilt hockey puck...It probably had been struck repeatedly by other traffic. I had nowhere to go and no time to brake. I might have moved a foot or two to the left before impact.
    I nailed the tire and to my surprise, the bike glanced off of it - (I don't know which glanced off of which, but I didn't stop dead in my tracks or get flipped into oncoming traffic).
    The bike started to do the freeway-speed wobble but quickly recovered, and I got over to the right shoulder as fast as I could.
    Expecting bent forks, trashed tire & rim, torn-off brake lines, exhaust leaks and other damage, I found a cracked horn, some smouldering rubber on the pipe and a little paint missing from the right valve cover. And a new button hole sewn into the seat.
    I rode it another 20 hiccup-free miles to work and looked for more damage. Found none. Rode the 50 miles home this morning and the bike seems to be as happy to be alive as I am.
    Those discarded tire fragments mean something totally new to me now.
    That's why, when I'm on the slab, (or on any road for that matter) I NEVER EVER ride so close to the vehicle in front of me that I can't see the road in front of it. I've read too many horror stories about people getting struck by flying road debris.
    I do what I can to avoid being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Once, while on the multi-laned 401, my Toyota truck was struck with a piece of re-tread that was hurled up at me by a truck that I was following too closely behind. The steel bumper was bent. If I had have been on my bike at the time the damages both to the bike and to my body would have been significantly worse.
    It's a tough job but somebody's gotta do it.

  4. #34
    lloving
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    Alls Well BUT...

    Riding to town on my R12RT approaching a bling S curve. Car approaching in the on coming lane with a large pickup following very closely behind. The pickup was towing an empty race car trailer with the obligatory tire rack just be hind the hitch. No racer on trailer but a full set of slicks were on the rack. Since they were NOT tied down one escaped in to my lane. Damn those things can bounce. Since there was no way to know where the thing was going next I stayed in my line to round the curve combination safely. Good choice given the the escaped tire made it to the shoulder just before I got to it.

    Lessons: Some things just happen. Appropriate speed and a clear head help. Also, as it relates to the truck driver aka race crew, you just can't fix stupid. I verified that when I did a U turn at the next intersection and went back to express my concern for his errant tire and see if he had any idea the impact that fugitive would have had on me or any other oncoming vehicle. His response (F... Y..), can only be abbreviated according to forum rules.

    Most important lesson learned by me? Should never made that U turn. Nothing to be gained from it.

    LL

  5. #35
    Registered User Mymidlife's Avatar
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    Routine 4AM commute, only wet roads this morning with showers around. Normal null traffic. Approaching an intersection where I change directions with a left turn, 2 through lanes, 2 left turn lanes, no medians. Turn light is red but can see from other lights it will go green momentarily. Two work trucks are in the right (outside) turn lane, light is just about to change to left arrow when I'm rolling up. *Routinely I get to the inside turn lane to be more visible to all and to increase my own visibility by not hiding behind vehicles. This time I hung back, didn't want to surprise the trucks at the moment the light changes. Hanging back a few feet off the 2nd truck, I drifted left into the inside turn lane, but still behind the last truck. Ahead of me, a vehicle is approaching, he still has the through light or it's yellow. SL is 40, car is doing at least that, maybe trying to beat the light? With the wet road and streetlights I can't see the centerline ahead, only the shadow/reflection, but something tells me this vehicle is over that line. As I tap the rear brake, I'm at wobble speed now, I realize the car is indeed going to blow through the inside turn lane, so just a second or two to duck back right, but close to the truck's rear and no speed anyway. My profile is halfway behind the stopped trucks rear and the car blasts through, apparently no slowing, it was close, but strangely not a panic, I think I was occupied trying to size things up. I always felt a bit vulnerable at that intersection, in that turn lane, even in daylight, but man this makes me think twice about it. See how I feel about it tomorrow. Lesson: 1) Alertness to changing conditions (car approaching, light changing), 2) leave wiggle room, escape route. Glad I was awake and looking ahead. That one was no joke, without my slight course correction he would have had me.
    Charles Ratliff
    North Phoenix, AZ
    G650 GS

    AZ Beemers

  6. #36
    Registered User arthurdent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lloving View Post

    Lessons: Some things just happen. Appropriate speed and a clear head help. Also, as it relates to the truck driver aka race crew, you just can't fix stupid. I verified that when I did a U turn at the next intersection and went back to express my concern for his errant tire and see if he had any idea the impact that fugitive would have had on me or any other oncoming vehicle. His response (F... Y..), can only be abbreviated according to forum rules.

    Most important lesson learned by me? Should never made that U turn. Nothing to be gained from it.

    LL
    Another option would have been to stop at the tire and inspect it with a 6" serrated blade. You do always carry a knife?

  7. #37
    OldBMWMaster JDOCKERY132445's Avatar
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    A lesson i never learned

    Quote Originally Posted by lloving View Post

    Lessons: His response (F... Y..), can only be abbreviated according to forum rules.

    Most important lesson learned by me? Should never made that U turn. Nothing to be gained from it.

    LL
    And those two words would have been the last he said with a fulls set of teeth. And yes, I have pulled more than one moron out of his vehicle and adjusted his attitude.
    Jerry Dockery
    309 N. 3rd. Ave.
    Kure Beach, NC 28449
    1996 R1100RT main bike & 1985 K100RS...too fast to believe.

  8. #38
    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
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    Tore hamstring early summer on wet concrete- jabbed a leg out trying to stop it. Man that sucked. Never took a day off. Took 2 months off from running, couldn't walk at normal speed for the first month. Was prescribed vicodin and a couch. Instead, I rode the bike home same-day. And was back riding in a week, but it was excruciating. I would have to take 2 or 3 tries to get on the bike, commute to work, then stop a block short and get off gingerly to limber up then get back on for the final block so I wouldn't fall over in the parking lot at work. Genius, I tell you.
    Quote Originally Posted by liftdump View Post
    What Happened......

    I stopped over at a buddies house who lives in a residential neighborhood. I decided to practice a low speed (I was around 5mph or less) counterweighted turn in order to park my bike the direction it needed to be. While I was dragging my rear brake in the turn, I applied a little to much pressure, the bike stopped and over I went. I put my foot out to try and hold bike up. Not able too, laid bike on side. Luckily I remembered and read in the motorcycle excellence manual about how to properly lift a bike up using your backside. Worked like a charm. My buddy was not home. I got back on my bike and rode home in some pain. At home I parked my bike, took off my riding gear, and then put my helmet away. I then called my buddy who's house I had stopped by to tell him my leg was sore and that I had dropped my bike in front of his house. He did not answer, I left a message. NEXT -I woke up in the Emergency Room.

    What really Happened.....
    When I put my foot out I tore my hamstring. After I got home, I took my helmet off and was standing in my garage, I fainted (body telling me to lay down after injuring hamstring), fell and hit my head on the garage floor. My buddy who I called got my message and came over. He saw me on the garage floor and called 911. I came home from the hospital the next day with a good bump on the head and a very sore hamstring. I was lucky, no permanent damage on my head or leg. A bonus was no damage to my bike other than a scratch on my valve cover -which I am leaving there for a while as a reminder. The road I had been riding on was just paved smooth blacktop.

    Dumb decisions to never make again.....
    -
    -Never put my foot out to try and stop a bike from tipping over. Bike is gonna win!
    -Never ride home if your hurt. Could have been a lot worse.


    What I learned.....

    - Practice, Practice, and more Practice
    - Integrated brakes handle differently than conventional. Know your braking system and how it effects low speed counter weight turning. (I was aware that I have integrated brakes, I did not think I had to use a different technique with them. They are touchy. I wish there was more written technique published on this. The "Motorcycle Excellence" manual does not go into integrated brake riding techniques besides mentioning that these type of brakes exist.) - I have been waiting to take the experienced riders course, so far the two I have been registered for got cancelled due to lack of students... I believe one of the instructors rides an RT. But I will get there one way or another.
    - Sit or Lay down after injuring yourself or your body might just do it for you.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

  9. #39
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Today's near miss



    Had one of those moments today...a deer encounter.
    It ended way better than the one a few years back that put me in a ditch.

    12:30 PM on a two lane state road with paved shoulders leaving a small town near Canyon Lake,TX...traveling at posted 65MPH. Weather was low clouds and rain in area ( I had just gone thru a shower a few minutes before, but roads were dry at this spot)
    Anyways, I was scanning as usual and as I move to my 11 o'clock I see something coming quickly at an angle right at me. I rolled off the throttle,squeezed the front lever and had just enough time to veer to the left as we intersected...It was one of the largest Hill country white tail bucks I have seen lately. I put him near 170 lbs...sorry, didn't count the points! He couldn't have gotten any closer to my windscreen...pretty surreal to say the least!


    I clipped his right rear hoove with the front wheel...felt the bump! I was maybe at 40MPH as this happened.
    I maintained lane position and rolled back on the throttle...looked in mirror to see him still running in stride and off the road towards the tree line.To say the least, my heart rate was jacked up!
    Of course he had two does trailing him that went right behind me and almost got tagged by the truck behind me.
    Had several folks come by me later when road widened to 4 lanes and gave me a big thumbs up and a head shake. I continued with the ride...my senses definitely on a high level buzz.

    It's that time of year...be careful out there!

    I wonder if the deer had a similar discussion afterwards?
    Last edited by henzilla; 09-29-2012 at 03:35 PM. Reason: added stuff
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  10. #40
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    This happened two years ago and I haven't ridden since for reasons completely unrelated to riding itself...thinking about getting back on in the not-too-distant future...anyway...

    It was a VERY hot and humid Sunday afternoon in August and I was riding home to Atlanta from South Carolina. I knew I needed to get some water in me soon, but I had two problems:

    1. I was in a small southern town where hardly any business was open on Sunday, and

    2. I missed a turn. I was riding through places I'd never been to before and was getting home by reversing the directions on a route-sheet I'd been given the previous morning before heading up to SC.

    Missing the turn distracted me from remembering water. After a little bit of back-and-forth I found the right road and made the turn- and a few moments later woke up on my bike, which was still upright and pointed the right direction, but a pickup truck in front of me had slowed to make a turn.

    I got most of my speed scrubbed off, but my front wheel still contacted the truck's bumper. Not by much, as revealed by the lack of a mark on the plastic bumper afterward, but enough to de-stabilise things. The front end rose, the bars went into a hard wobble, and the next thing I knew I was sliding along on my left side watching the bike bounce along on its left side and cursing mightily inside my helmet.

    Short version of the aftermath: My right radius was broken, probably due to the handlebar smacking my hand during the wobble, and the insurance company totaled the bike. I had to call a friend to drop everything and drive a 180-mile round trip getting home after midnight to get me home from the hospital. I required surgery to implant a titanium plate (still in there), and I missed five weeks of work because I was was a field-service guy and there was no way I could work with one hand. No medical leave either, because there was no paid leave of any kind at my company. Thank goodness the insurance company paid me $3K more than I owed on the bike; I lived on that for a few weeks.

    The morals of the story:

    1. STAY HYDRATED!
    2. Don't get hooked into 'get-there-itis.' When you know you need water, or rest, or food, or whatever...don't put it off because you want to make 'just one more' point along the way first.
    3. Make sure your insurance is up to task. My health insurance was an 80/20 policy, basically a 'catastrophic' plan. To this day I don't want to add up all the stuff I wound up having to self-pay, and pay I did.
    4. Did I mention to STAY HYDRATED? If you live in a hot and/or dry climate, it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to keep an emergency bottle of water stashed on the bike in case you're far from civilisation.
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  11. #41
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Hi Ben...
    Been a while ...good to see you back and hope you find the right bike
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Veg View Post
    The morals of the story:

    1. STAY HYDRATED!
    2. Don't get hooked into 'get-there-itis.' When you know you need water, or rest, or food, or whatever...don't put it off because you want to make 'just one more' point along the way first.
    3. Make sure your insurance is up to task. My health insurance was an 80/20 policy, basically a 'catastrophic' plan. To this day I don't want to add up all the stuff I wound up having to self-pay, and pay I did.
    4. Did I mention to STAY HYDRATED? If you live in a hot and/or dry climate, it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to keep an emergency bottle of water stashed on the bike in case you're far from civilisation.
    as a follow-up on the importace of "stay hydrated" - by the time you feel like you are thirsty, you are already in the beginning stages of dehydration. i've gone to riding with a fully loaded/iced Camelbak for anything over 2 hours or so, and it really makes a big difference. no need to stop to get water in... and it will force you to stop to get it out soon enough, so you will be taking your breaks, regardless.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  13. #43
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    Hi Steve,
    Good seeing you too and nice to know that there are still a few familiar faces around this corner of the web.
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  14. #44
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    Steve, glad you didn't come off the bike in your last close deer encounter. A friend of mine lived for about 15 years in southeast British Columbia where there are numerous vehicle/deer or elk collisions. Guess we all know that dusk and dawn are the worst times, night pretty bad, and NO time totally safe.

    What I DIDN'T KNOW was that the rut occurs in November there and there are something like THREE TO FOUR times as many vehicle/animal collisions during that period as any other month of the year. I guess many of us can remember how sex drove us nuts. Apparently true of deer and elk too; not the brightest animals on the planet.

    You might want to check what the rutting season is in your area and, if it is infested with deer, possibly think of parking the bike during that period.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  15. #45
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    You might want to check what the rutting season is in your area and, if it is infested with deer, possibly think of parking the bike during that period.
    It's a wide range here and the drought has impacted movement as well. We do try to avoid certain hours and areas...but it's not really totally possible,short of not riding .We see them all year long.
    this from the Parks & Wildlife site:

    Conception dates for this region ranged from as early as October 9 to a late date of January 30. The Edwards Plateau, Texas' highest deer production region, was divided into three areas for the study

    Have deer all on our property...a type A doe with two fawns ruled the area around our house a few months ago...even chasing our Blue Heeler! I have been almost run over taking the trash out in the dark

    It was unusual that the does were chasing the buck in my encounter ...instead of the other way around...modern times
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

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